60 pippa.io <![CDATA[Here's an Idea]]> https://feed.pippa.io/public/shows/heres-an-idea en Tech Briefs Media Tech Briefs no Kendra Smith info+5a986f9235616709672cf661@mg.pippa.io episodic https://assets.pippa.io/shows/5a986f9235616709672cf661/1520630317436-26cf9e163491987a617e5e11a852d856.jpeg https://feed.pippa.io/public/shows/heres-an-idea <![CDATA[Here's an Idea]]> <![CDATA[Alcohol]]> Mon, 13 Aug 2018 19:00:31 GMT 23:58 5b71b313eadf1269788e8177 no full 1 6 The process for making wine, beer, and spirits has remained relatively the same for centuries.


In this episode of Here’s an Idea™, we look at the efforts of vineyard owners, distillers, and brewers who are discovering small ways to innovate and adjust their own crafting processes.


We speak with former scientists and engineers who are putting their own spin on traditional ideas, using knowledge gained from their previous experience in the lab.

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The process for making wine, beer, and spirits has remained relatively the same for centuries.


In this episode of Here’s an Idea™, we look at the efforts of vineyard owners, distillers, and brewers who are discovering small ways to innovate and adjust their own crafting processes.


We speak with former scientists and engineers who are putting their own spin on traditional ideas, using knowledge gained from their previous experience in the lab.

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<![CDATA[Superpowers]]> Tue, 17 Jul 2018 14:08:57 GMT 30:24 5b4df6a2dbb1b14828574363 no full 1 5 Engineers today are using their creativity to build a variety of superhero-like technologies that enhance our human capabilities, including exosuits, invisibility cloaks, and wall-scaling gloves.


What drives these researchers? Were they all comic-book reading dreamers? Or is a need to imagine bigger and better human capabilities just a natural part of who we are?


In this episode of Here's an Idea, we talk with researchers whose technologies are giving people the capabilities of their favorite superheroes, from Spider-Man to Iron-Man. With some help from comic book writer Vita Ayala, we examine the motivations behind their projects, and what these impulses might say about our own desire to be super.

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Engineers today are using their creativity to build a variety of superhero-like technologies that enhance our human capabilities, including exosuits, invisibility cloaks, and wall-scaling gloves.


What drives these researchers? Were they all comic-book reading dreamers? Or is a need to imagine bigger and better human capabilities just a natural part of who we are?


In this episode of Here's an Idea, we talk with researchers whose technologies are giving people the capabilities of their favorite superheroes, from Spider-Man to Iron-Man. With some help from comic book writer Vita Ayala, we examine the motivations behind their projects, and what these impulses might say about our own desire to be super.

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<![CDATA[Sponges]]> Tue, 12 Jun 2018 07:00:17 GMT 24:32 5b1ebb0ccf1ded3845f4d4df no full 1 4 After a disaster like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf coast, what if a giant sponge could clean up the area and the wildlife around it? What if a bunch of tiny sponges could quickly save gunshot victims? In this episode of Here's an Idea, we look at how researchers are doing just that, and expanding the sponge concept to entire cities.


Access full-length interviews with the episode's featured researchers here:


Reusable ‘Oleo’ Sponge Soaks Up Oil Spills

https://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/tb/stories/blog/28837


Sponge-Inspired XSTAT Device Quickly Seals Gunshot Wounds

https://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/tb/stories/blog/28810

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After a disaster like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf coast, what if a giant sponge could clean up the area and the wildlife around it? What if a bunch of tiny sponges could quickly save gunshot victims? In this episode of Here's an Idea, we look at how researchers are doing just that, and expanding the sponge concept to entire cities.


Access full-length interviews with the episode's featured researchers here:


Reusable ‘Oleo’ Sponge Soaks Up Oil Spills

https://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/tb/stories/blog/28837


Sponge-Inspired XSTAT Device Quickly Seals Gunshot Wounds

https://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/tb/stories/blog/28810

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<![CDATA[Humanoid Robots]]> Mon, 14 May 2018 22:10:40 GMT 18:10 5afa080f802ac1c025073f62 no full 1 3 Some conditions are too dangerous, or just too mundane, for people.

For decades, humanoid robots have been stepping in to take tasks off our hands. One named Manny spent a lot of the 80s being shot with a flamethrower. Another, R2, is currently doing chores in space.

In this episode, we look at how humanoid robots have evolved, and why we have the need for robots that look, act, and even think like humans.

Episode highlights include:

  • In 1988, a team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) created a mannequin robot named, well, "Manny." Manny’s job was test the shielding clothing used in hazardous environments. Gordon Anderson, one of the original engineers, talks about his time making Manny.
  • NASA's Dr. Julia Badger is one of the original developers of the Robonaut 2 – the first humanoid robot in space. She talks about expectation versus reality when dealing with a 330-lb robotic assistant.
  • Dr. Scholtz, a computer scientist at PNNL, evaluates how humans interact with computers. Dr. Leslie Blaha, a PNNL mathematical psychologist, leverages cognitive human-behavior models to add a more “life-like” intelligence to robots. The two share their insights in robot-human interaction.

Read the full-length interviews and related stories below.

A Look Back at the Trailblazing "Manny" Robot – A Firefighter's Friend

A Role for Boston Dynamics’ Back-Flipping Robots: Is Space the Place?

How to Understand Humanity Through Humanoids

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Some conditions are too dangerous, or just too mundane, for people.

For decades, humanoid robots have been stepping in to take tasks off our hands. One named Manny spent a lot of the 80s being shot with a flamethrower. Another, R2, is currently doing chores in space.

In this episode, we look at how humanoid robots have evolved, and why we have the need for robots that look, act, and even think like humans.

Episode highlights include:

  • In 1988, a team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) created a mannequin robot named, well, "Manny." Manny’s job was test the shielding clothing used in hazardous environments. Gordon Anderson, one of the original engineers, talks about his time making Manny.
  • NASA's Dr. Julia Badger is one of the original developers of the Robonaut 2 – the first humanoid robot in space. She talks about expectation versus reality when dealing with a 330-lb robotic assistant.
  • Dr. Scholtz, a computer scientist at PNNL, evaluates how humans interact with computers. Dr. Leslie Blaha, a PNNL mathematical psychologist, leverages cognitive human-behavior models to add a more “life-like” intelligence to robots. The two share their insights in robot-human interaction.

Read the full-length interviews and related stories below.

A Look Back at the Trailblazing "Manny" Robot – A Firefighter's Friend

A Role for Boston Dynamics’ Back-Flipping Robots: Is Space the Place?

How to Understand Humanity Through Humanoids

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<![CDATA[Rockets]]> Mon, 09 Apr 2018 14:30:36 GMT 15:22 5ac7ddcbef7a4c2376786e5b no full 1 2 On a snowy day in 1926, a physicist named Robert Goddard set out to his Aunt Effie's ranch. What happened next was not your typical day on the farm – Goddard launched the first liquid-propellant rocket.

In this episode of Here's an Idea™, we explore how Dr. Goddard's efforts, almost 100 years ago, have inspired generations of rocketeers and spaceflight launches.

We speak with engineering student Josh Allen; Orbital ATK’s Mark Ogren; NASA’s Rob Garner; and Estes model-rocket director Michael Fritz.

Access full-length interviews below.

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On a snowy day in 1926, a physicist named Robert Goddard set out to his Aunt Effie's ranch. What happened next was not your typical day on the farm – Goddard launched the first liquid-propellant rocket.

In this episode of Here's an Idea™, we explore how Dr. Goddard's efforts, almost 100 years ago, have inspired generations of rocketeers and spaceflight launches.

We speak with engineering student Josh Allen; Orbital ATK’s Mark Ogren; NASA’s Rob Garner; and Estes model-rocket director Michael Fritz.

Access full-length interviews below.

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<![CDATA[3D Printing]]> Mon, 12 Mar 2018 17:54:08 GMT 15:08 5aa1a65fdad5033c469450f6 no full 1 1 Chances are you’ve heard of 3D printing - the modern fabrication process being used today to make everything from football cleats to dental implants.

In this episode of Here's an Idea™ we look at how 3D printing began. We speak with the creator of the 3D printer himself, Chuck Hull, who admits he could never have guessed that his "stereolithography apparatus" would be capable of so much more than prototyping plastic parts.

In the making of this episode, we also spoke to industry insider Terry Wohlers and engineer Ramille Shah. Access the full-length interviews below.


How 3D Printing Began, Layer by Layer: An Interview with Chuck Hull

Terry Wohlers' Insight on the 3D Printing Landscape - Then and Now

Ramille Shah Talks About Bringing 3D-Bioprinting to Life

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Chances are you’ve heard of 3D printing - the modern fabrication process being used today to make everything from football cleats to dental implants.

In this episode of Here's an Idea™ we look at how 3D printing began. We speak with the creator of the 3D printer himself, Chuck Hull, who admits he could never have guessed that his "stereolithography apparatus" would be capable of so much more than prototyping plastic parts.

In the making of this episode, we also spoke to industry insider Terry Wohlers and engineer Ramille Shah. Access the full-length interviews below.


How 3D Printing Began, Layer by Layer: An Interview with Chuck Hull

Terry Wohlers' Insight on the 3D Printing Landscape - Then and Now

Ramille Shah Talks About Bringing 3D-Bioprinting to Life

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