60 pippa.io Work and Life with Stew Friedman http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/ en All rights reserved Wharton, WorkLife, Leadership Work and Life with Stew Friedman no Work and Life with Stew Friedman info+5bedbd27430c181902d0eb2b@mg.pippa.io episodic https://assets.pippa.io/shows/5bedbd27430c181902d0eb2b/show-cover.jpg http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/ Work and Life with Stew Friedman https://feed.pippa.io/public/shows/workandlifepodcast Ep 101. James Pawelski and Suzann Pileggi Pawelski: Happy Together Ep 101. James Pawelski and Suzann Pileggi Pawelski: Happy Together Wed, 05 Dec 2018 13:17:02 GMT 47:53 5c07cfcfdcf26a0456a66bab no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-101-james-pawelski-and-suzann-pileggi-pawelski-happy-toge full Professor James Pawelski and his wife Suzann Pileggi Pawelski are co-authors of Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love That Lasts. James is Professor of Practice and Director of Education in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, where he co-founded the world's first Master of Applied Positive Psychology Program with Martin Seligman in 2005. In collaboration with Penn’s Campaign for Wellness, he is launching a new interdisciplinary undergraduate course called “The Pursuit of Happiness” to help students learn how to increase their well-being. Suzie is a freelance writer and well-being consultant specializing in the science of happiness and its effects on health and relationships. Her 2010 Scientific American Mind cover story, "The Happy Couple," was selected for inclusion in three special issues of the magazine and became the catalyst their book! Together, Suzie and James give Romance and Research™ workshops around the world. She pens a popular blog for Psychology Today and writes the “Science of Well-being” column for Live Happy, where she is also a contributing editor.


James and Suzie sit down with Stew in the studio and talk about how to make relationships last by focusing on one’s own strengths and one’s partners’ strengths. They use the free online VIA survey of character strengths which enables you to recognize your five signature strengths -- attributes such as leadership, love of learning, curiosity, zestfulness, and kindness. James and Suzie explore the importance of focusing on the good in ourselves and others to cultivate relationships that are more than merely utilitarian or pleasurable. And they emphasize the necessity of continual conversations and the importance of remaining curious so we can complement and not complete each other, so we remain individuals who want to be together. Their website --

buildhappytogether.com offers lots of resources to explore further.

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Professor James Pawelski and his wife Suzann Pileggi Pawelski are co-authors of Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love That Lasts. James is Professor of Practice and Director of Education in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, where he co-founded the world's first Master of Applied Positive Psychology Program with Martin Seligman in 2005. In collaboration with Penn’s Campaign for Wellness, he is launching a new interdisciplinary undergraduate course called “The Pursuit of Happiness” to help students learn how to increase their well-being. Suzie is a freelance writer and well-being consultant specializing in the science of happiness and its effects on health and relationships. Her 2010 Scientific American Mind cover story, "The Happy Couple," was selected for inclusion in three special issues of the magazine and became the catalyst their book! Together, Suzie and James give Romance and Research™ workshops around the world. She pens a popular blog for Psychology Today and writes the “Science of Well-being” column for Live Happy, where she is also a contributing editor.


James and Suzie sit down with Stew in the studio and talk about how to make relationships last by focusing on one’s own strengths and one’s partners’ strengths. They use the free online VIA survey of character strengths which enables you to recognize your five signature strengths -- attributes such as leadership, love of learning, curiosity, zestfulness, and kindness. James and Suzie explore the importance of focusing on the good in ourselves and others to cultivate relationships that are more than merely utilitarian or pleasurable. And they emphasize the necessity of continual conversations and the importance of remaining curious so we can complement and not complete each other, so we remain individuals who want to be together. Their website --

buildhappytogether.com offers lots of resources to explore further.

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Ep 100. Dan Schawbel: Back to Human Ep 100. Dan Schawbel: Back to Human Wed, 28 Nov 2018 11:05:45 GMT 48:58 5bfdbc746a8b906d73ffaf74 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-100-dan-schawbel-back-to-human Dan Schawbel on technology is isolating or connecting full Dan Schawbel is a partner and research director at Future Workplace, an HR advisory and research firm, and the Founder of both Millennial Branding and WorkplaceTrends.com.  His third business book is Back to Human: How Great Leaders Create Connection in the Age of Isolation. Dan is bestselling author of two previous books: Promote Yourself and Me 2.0.    He’s conducted dozens of research studies and interviewed over 2,000 of the world’s most successful people, including Warren Buffett, Anthony Bourdain, Jessica Alba, will.i.am, and Michael Bloomberg. He has been recognized on lists of fascinating, high-impact thought leaders, like Inc.’s and Forbes’ “30 Under 30” and many others .


Dan and Stew talk about the use and abuse of technology. They explore how technology’s promise as a vehicle for connectivity hasn’t been fully realized because it paradoxically produces loneliness.  For instance, remote workers are harder to retain; they tend to be less committed to their organizations because they lack sufficient in-person human contact. They also discuss technology’s upside; how it can be used to increase efficiency and to help people build communities online so they don’t feel so isolated. This has been an especially effective tool for people who reach out for help by making themselves vulnerable and sharing their struggles, including with mental health problems.  Dan describes some of the practical ideas and tools from his research, including The Work Connectivity Index, a diagnostic companies use to assess whether and how people do indeed feel isolated and alone.

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Dan Schawbel is a partner and research director at Future Workplace, an HR advisory and research firm, and the Founder of both Millennial Branding and WorkplaceTrends.com.  His third business book is Back to Human: How Great Leaders Create Connection in the Age of Isolation. Dan is bestselling author of two previous books: Promote Yourself and Me 2.0.    He’s conducted dozens of research studies and interviewed over 2,000 of the world’s most successful people, including Warren Buffett, Anthony Bourdain, Jessica Alba, will.i.am, and Michael Bloomberg. He has been recognized on lists of fascinating, high-impact thought leaders, like Inc.’s and Forbes’ “30 Under 30” and many others .


Dan and Stew talk about the use and abuse of technology. They explore how technology’s promise as a vehicle for connectivity hasn’t been fully realized because it paradoxically produces loneliness.  For instance, remote workers are harder to retain; they tend to be less committed to their organizations because they lack sufficient in-person human contact. They also discuss technology’s upside; how it can be used to increase efficiency and to help people build communities online so they don’t feel so isolated. This has been an especially effective tool for people who reach out for help by making themselves vulnerable and sharing their struggles, including with mental health problems.  Dan describes some of the practical ideas and tools from his research, including The Work Connectivity Index, a diagnostic companies use to assess whether and how people do indeed feel isolated and alone.

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Ep 99. Tom Gardner: For the Long Run Ep 99. Tom Gardner: For the Long Run Wed, 21 Nov 2018 11:15:00 GMT 47:21 5bf4b396ac5f7c5c0255f316 no http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/tomgardner CEO of the Motley Fool full Tom Gardner is CEO of The Motley Fool, a company he co-founded with his brother, David, in 1993.  In 2014 and 2015, Glassdoor ranked The Motley Fool the #1 place to work in the U.S. for companies with between 250-1000 employees. Gardner strives to create an environment at work where their employees have autonomy and where there are as few as possible mandates from the top; an environment where everyone can thrive.  The Motley Fool allows employees to select some of their personal benefits (like haircuts) in addition to the standard healthcare and 401K package. They offer employees $200 as an incentive to ask for a raise. Tom is lead advisor on Motley Fool One -- the company's all-access service. He manages The Everlasting Portfolio, which committed to holding every investment for more than five years, and to date has beaten the market soundly since its inception. Tom is a graduate of Brown University.


In this episode, Stew and Tom talk about why most of us are not taught about the basics of financial literacy and The Motley Fool’s commitment to helping people understand money, investing, planning for their future, and becoming financially secure in order to have more choices in life. Tom discusses the keys to success in investing as well as how The Motley Fool strives to help all its stakeholders -- starting with its employees -- feel cared for, in the long run, and achieve real autonomy so they can thrive in all aspects of life.


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Tom Gardner is CEO of The Motley Fool, a company he co-founded with his brother, David, in 1993.  In 2014 and 2015, Glassdoor ranked The Motley Fool the #1 place to work in the U.S. for companies with between 250-1000 employees. Gardner strives to create an environment at work where their employees have autonomy and where there are as few as possible mandates from the top; an environment where everyone can thrive.  The Motley Fool allows employees to select some of their personal benefits (like haircuts) in addition to the standard healthcare and 401K package. They offer employees $200 as an incentive to ask for a raise. Tom is lead advisor on Motley Fool One -- the company's all-access service. He manages The Everlasting Portfolio, which committed to holding every investment for more than five years, and to date has beaten the market soundly since its inception. Tom is a graduate of Brown University.


In this episode, Stew and Tom talk about why most of us are not taught about the basics of financial literacy and The Motley Fool’s commitment to helping people understand money, investing, planning for their future, and becoming financially secure in order to have more choices in life. Tom discusses the keys to success in investing as well as how The Motley Fool strives to help all its stakeholders -- starting with its employees -- feel cared for, in the long run, and achieve real autonomy so they can thrive in all aspects of life.


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<![CDATA[Ep 98. Jason Fried: It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work]]> Wed, 14 Nov 2018 14:54:50 GMT 50:52 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/529802280 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-98-jason-fried-it-doesnt-have-to-be-crazy-at-work Jason is Co-Founder and CEO of Basecamp, a Chicag… full Ep 97. Erin Owen: Eastern Wisdom for Western Leadership Ep 97. Erin Owen: Eastern Wisdom for Western Leadership Wed, 31 Oct 2018 16:14:20 GMT 35:18 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/522735420 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-97-erin-owen-eastern-wisdom-for-western-leadership Erin Owen, author of Refuel Recharge and Re-energ… full Erin Owen, author of Refuel Recharge and Re-energize: Your Guide to Taking Back Control of Your Time and Energy, joined Total Leadership’s client services team in 2005. She earned her MBA from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and her graduate certificate in International Studies from the Hopkins-Nanjing Center in Nanjing, China. She holds a B.A. in Chinese Studies from Grinnell and certification in Health Coaching from the internationally recognized Institute for Integrative Nutrition in Manhattan, where Drs. Deepak Chopra, Andrew Weil, and Neil Barnard are faculty members. Drawing on over two decades of experience ranging from organizational change management consulting to leadership coaching, Erin has consulted with and coached hundreds of entrepreneurs, business leaders, C-suite teams, and private individuals from more than 15 countries in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. She takes a unique East-meets-West approach to helping clients more effectively manage their professional lives, grow their leadership capacity and resilience, and lead healthier, happier, more productive lives. Erin is working mother and avid traveler who regularly leads learning groups to Asia. She is passionate about teaching a more sustainable way of living and working—a simpler, more harmonious way that allows us to thrive while preserving what is most precious and important. Erin and Stew discuss how she helps people grow as leaders. She describes her easily accessible method for identifying what a person needs to change and how they can change it while cultivating healthy relationships. To illustrate, Stew and Erin talk to someone who called the radio show about how he can improve the management of his priorities in his professional life and his family life. Erin Owen, author of Refuel Recharge and Re-energize: Your Guide to Taking Back Control of Your Time and Energy, joined Total Leadership’s client services team in 2005. She earned her MBA from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and her graduate certificate in International Studies from the Hopkins-Nanjing Center in Nanjing, China. She holds a B.A. in Chinese Studies from Grinnell and certification in Health Coaching from the internationally recognized Institute for Integrative Nutrition in Manhattan, where Drs. Deepak Chopra, Andrew Weil, and Neil Barnard are faculty members. Drawing on over two decades of experience ranging from organizational change management consulting to leadership coaching, Erin has consulted with and coached hundreds of entrepreneurs, business leaders, C-suite teams, and private individuals from more than 15 countries in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. She takes a unique East-meets-West approach to helping clients more effectively manage their professional lives, grow their leadership capacity and resilience, and lead healthier, happier, more productive lives. Erin is working mother and avid traveler who regularly leads learning groups to Asia. She is passionate about teaching a more sustainable way of living and working—a simpler, more harmonious way that allows us to thrive while preserving what is most precious and important. Erin and Stew discuss how she helps people grow as leaders. She describes her easily accessible method for identifying what a person needs to change and how they can change it while cultivating healthy relationships. To illustrate, Stew and Erin talk to someone who called the radio show about how he can improve the management of his priorities in his professional life and his family life. Ep 96. Shaun Francis: Eat, Move, Think Ep 96. Shaun Francis: Eat, Move, Think Wed, 24 Oct 2018 12:13:47 GMT 49:47 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/519134568 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-96-shaun-francis-eat-move-think Shaun Francis is Chair and CEO of Medcan and he’s… full Shaun Francis is Chair and CEO of Medcan and he’s author of a recently released book entitled Eat, Move, Think: The Path to a Healthier, Stronger, Happier You. He was a student in Stew’s very first Total Leadership class for Executive MBAs at Wharton. Medcan is a global leader in assessing their clients’ overall well-being and inspiring them to live well for life. It’s routinely recognized for as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies. Shaun graduated from the United States Naval Academy after he was nominated by President Reagan to attend as a Canadian. He received the military’s highest recognition for a civilian, The Canadian Forces medallion for Distinguished Service, for his work on behalf of veterans. He’s received an honorary doctorate and countless other awards. Shaun co-led an expedition to the summit of Island Peak, adjacent to Mount Everest, with 12 injured Canadian, soldiers raising funds the True Patriot Love Foundation, which Shaun chairs. Stew and Shaun talk about the importance of our physical health for longevity, quality of life, and work performance. They drill down on the best diet (the Mediterranean ) and how it’s a sustainable one, not a fad. They talk about cardio as a way to prolong life and muscle strengthening as a way to improve the quality of one’s life over time. They discuss how the mind, and the way we exercise our choices, is central to prolonged health. They delve into the pernicious impact of the stigma of mental health care. Shaun uses the example of wounded warriors, the most fit among us, succumbing to mental health problems as an illustration how we are all of vulnerable to mental strain. They also talk about the importance of being role models for our children. Shaun Francis is Chair and CEO of Medcan and he’s author of a recently released book entitled Eat, Move, Think: The Path to a Healthier, Stronger, Happier You. He was a student in Stew’s very first Total Leadership class for Executive MBAs at Wharton. Medcan is a global leader in assessing their clients’ overall well-being and inspiring them to live well for life. It’s routinely recognized for as one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies. Shaun graduated from the United States Naval Academy after he was nominated by President Reagan to attend as a Canadian. He received the military’s highest recognition for a civilian, The Canadian Forces medallion for Distinguished Service, for his work on behalf of veterans. He’s received an honorary doctorate and countless other awards. Shaun co-led an expedition to the summit of Island Peak, adjacent to Mount Everest, with 12 injured Canadian, soldiers raising funds the True Patriot Love Foundation, which Shaun chairs. Stew and Shaun talk about the importance of our physical health for longevity, quality of life, and work performance. They drill down on the best diet (the Mediterranean ) and how it’s a sustainable one, not a fad. They talk about cardio as a way to prolong life and muscle strengthening as a way to improve the quality of one’s life over time. They discuss how the mind, and the way we exercise our choices, is central to prolonged health. They delve into the pernicious impact of the stigma of mental health care. Shaun uses the example of wounded warriors, the most fit among us, succumbing to mental health problems as an illustration how we are all of vulnerable to mental strain. They also talk about the importance of being role models for our children. Ep 95. Ben Feder: Working to Live or Living to Work? Ep 95. Ben Feder: Working to Live or Living to Work? Wed, 17 Oct 2018 12:28:49 GMT 51:11 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/515624094 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-95-ben-feder-working-to-live-or-living-to-work Ben Feder is President of International Partnersh… full Ben Feder is President of International Partnerships for the U. S. for Tencent, the Chinese internet titan that owns WeChat. Previously, Ben was CEO of Take Two Interactive, publisher of Red Dead Redemption and Grand Theft Auto. He’s the author of Take Off Your Shoes: One Man’s Journey from the Boardroom to Bali and Back, a tale of his journey of self-discovery when he left corporate America, unplugged, and took his family to live in Bali for a year. Stew and Ben talk about priorities in our lives and how to keep them foremost in our minds. They talk about legacy and what that might mean for how we live our lives every day. They discuss the importance of realizing, hard as it may be to see, that we all have choices -- even if we don’t have the option to chuck it all and move to a Pacific island for a long stretch -- and that it’s essential to make conscious, deliberate decisions about what we do with our precious time on earth. Ben describes the benefits of mindfulness, yoga, and a practice of inquiry, or challenging assumptions, especially about ourselves, for freeing ourselves to live in a way that’s more closely aligned with our values. Ben Feder is President of International Partnerships for the U. S. for Tencent, the Chinese internet titan that owns WeChat. Previously, Ben was CEO of Take Two Interactive, publisher of Red Dead Redemption and Grand Theft Auto. He’s the author of Take Off Your Shoes: One Man’s Journey from the Boardroom to Bali and Back, a tale of his journey of self-discovery when he left corporate America, unplugged, and took his family to live in Bali for a year. Stew and Ben talk about priorities in our lives and how to keep them foremost in our minds. They talk about legacy and what that might mean for how we live our lives every day. They discuss the importance of realizing, hard as it may be to see, that we all have choices -- even if we don’t have the option to chuck it all and move to a Pacific island for a long stretch -- and that it’s essential to make conscious, deliberate decisions about what we do with our precious time on earth. Ben describes the benefits of mindfulness, yoga, and a practice of inquiry, or challenging assumptions, especially about ourselves, for freeing ourselves to live in a way that’s more closely aligned with our values. Ep 94. Sally Thornton: The Future of Work is Fluid Ep 94. Sally Thornton: The Future of Work is Fluid Wed, 10 Oct 2018 13:25:42 GMT 49:40 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/512265987 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-94-sally-thornton-the-future-of-work-is-fluid Sally Thornton is founder and CEO of Forshay, a c… full Ep 93. Johann Berlin: Do Less To Do More Ep 93. Johann Berlin: Do Less To Do More Wed, 03 Oct 2018 14:17:11 GMT 44:52 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/508930443 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-93-johann-berlin-do-less-to-do-more Johann Berlin, CEO of TLEX Institute (which stand… full Johann Berlin, CEO of TLEX Institute (which stands for Transformational Leadership for Excellence) specializes in working with CEOs, companies and corporate teams to improve their connections to each other through techniques that promote mental clarity — some that you’ll recognize if you practice yoga. He says better mental clarity — it’s often called mindfulness — is needed to process the constant flow of information we receive, to navigate challenges, and to handle stress. Johann focuses on adaptive leadership and stress management. He works with organizations to transform their cultures, starting with the individual. Stew and Johann talk about proven methods for managing the stress of our 24/7 technologically-connected world and how his organization brings these ideas and tools to companies around the world. Johann talks about how he learned these methods in his childhood and he describes research on the many psychological and physiological benefits of conscious breathing, mindfulness, connecting with nature, and meaningful open relations with other people. Johann Berlin, CEO of TLEX Institute (which stands for Transformational Leadership for Excellence) specializes in working with CEOs, companies and corporate teams to improve their connections to each other through techniques that promote mental clarity — some that you’ll recognize if you practice yoga. He says better mental clarity — it’s often called mindfulness — is needed to process the constant flow of information we receive, to navigate challenges, and to handle stress. Johann focuses on adaptive leadership and stress management. He works with organizations to transform their cultures, starting with the individual. Stew and Johann talk about proven methods for managing the stress of our 24/7 technologically-connected world and how his organization brings these ideas and tools to companies around the world. Johann talks about how he learned these methods in his childhood and he describes research on the many psychological and physiological benefits of conscious breathing, mindfulness, connecting with nature, and meaningful open relations with other people. Ep 92. Erica Dhawan: Get Big Things Done Ep 92. Erica Dhawan: Get Big Things Done Wed, 26 Sep 2018 13:42:56 GMT 39:16 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/505451967 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-92-erica-dhawan-get-big-things-done Erica Dhawan is Founder and CEO of Cotential, an … full Erica Dhawan is Founder and CEO of Cotential, an organization that works to maximize the power of connection in the workplace and beyond. Their services include training programs, speakers, and tools for businesses to leverage their potential connections. Erica attended the Wharton School as well as MIT and Harvard University. She was named by Thinkers50 as “The Oprah of Management Ideas” and co-authored the bestseller Get Big Things Done: The Power of Connectional Intelligence. Erica thinks workplaces should be more connected. In this conversation with Stew she provides examples of millennials who have used social media to connect and improve productivity. Millennials have shown great leadership in creating informal networks online. Erica describes how this new way of working has disrupted some traditional industries. She discusses the rise of informal networks and social movements as a result of our growing connectivity and how these interactions spur innovative thinking and inspire courageous change Erica Dhawan is Founder and CEO of Cotential, an organization that works to maximize the power of connection in the workplace and beyond. Their services include training programs, speakers, and tools for businesses to leverage their potential connections. Erica attended the Wharton School as well as MIT and Harvard University. She was named by Thinkers50 as “The Oprah of Management Ideas” and co-authored the bestseller Get Big Things Done: The Power of Connectional Intelligence. Erica thinks workplaces should be more connected. In this conversation with Stew she provides examples of millennials who have used social media to connect and improve productivity. Millennials have shown great leadership in creating informal networks online. Erica describes how this new way of working has disrupted some traditional industries. She discusses the rise of informal networks and social movements as a result of our growing connectivity and how these interactions spur innovative thinking and inspire courageous change Ep 91. Francesca Gino: Rebel Talent Ep 91. Francesca Gino: Rebel Talent Thu, 20 Sep 2018 00:04:34 GMT 50:06 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/502357035 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-91-francesca-gino-rebel-talent Francesca Gino is a behavioral scientist and the … full Ep 90. Nigel Travis: The Challenge Culture Ep 90. Nigel Travis: The Challenge Culture Wed, 12 Sep 2018 13:35:52 GMT 50:09 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/498861186 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-90-nigel-travis-the-challenge-culture full Ep 89. Amy Edmondson: Creating the Fearless Organization Ep 89. Amy Edmondson: Creating the Fearless Organization Wed, 05 Sep 2018 13:12:43 GMT 39:49 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/495518238 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-89-amy-edmondson-creating-the-fearless-organization Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leader… full Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School. Her work on teaming, psychological safety, and leadership influences corporate and academic audiences around the world. In November Wiley will publish her latest book, which is called The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace For Learning, Innovation and Growth. Her other books include Extreme Teaming: Lessons in Complex, Cross-Sector Leadership, which provides new insight into the effective management of global enterprises and teaming across boundaries. She is also the author of Building the Future: Big Teaming for Audacious Innovation, Teaming to Innovate. Amy has published numerous articles in the Harvard Business Review and in leading academic journals . She has been recognized by the biannual Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers since 2011 and was honored with the Talent Award in 2017. Stew and Amy talk about the importance of psychological safety at work in today’s knowledge-driven economy. Fresh, bold, and perhaps outrageous ideas need to be able to bubble up for organizations to be learning and innovating successfully. Amy describes the recipe for how managers can create a psychologically safe environment: set the stage by reminding people of the mission and their place in achieving it; invite people to contribute their thoughts, suggestions and questions; and respond productively and with curiosity about even the wackiest ideas. She provides tips for producing change in workplace culture, to make it less fearful, from the bottom up. Stew and Amy also talk about the impact of fear at work on life at home. Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at Harvard Business School. Her work on teaming, psychological safety, and leadership influences corporate and academic audiences around the world. In November Wiley will publish her latest book, which is called The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace For Learning, Innovation and Growth. Her other books include Extreme Teaming: Lessons in Complex, Cross-Sector Leadership, which provides new insight into the effective management of global enterprises and teaming across boundaries. She is also the author of Building the Future: Big Teaming for Audacious Innovation, Teaming to Innovate. Amy has published numerous articles in the Harvard Business Review and in leading academic journals . She has been recognized by the biannual Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers since 2011 and was honored with the Talent Award in 2017. Stew and Amy talk about the importance of psychological safety at work in today’s knowledge-driven economy. Fresh, bold, and perhaps outrageous ideas need to be able to bubble up for organizations to be learning and innovating successfully. Amy describes the recipe for how managers can create a psychologically safe environment: set the stage by reminding people of the mission and their place in achieving it; invite people to contribute their thoughts, suggestions and questions; and respond productively and with curiosity about even the wackiest ideas. She provides tips for producing change in workplace culture, to make it less fearful, from the bottom up. Stew and Amy also talk about the impact of fear at work on life at home. Ep 88. Laura Vanderkam: Off the Clock Ep 88. Laura Vanderkam: Off the Clock Wed, 29 Aug 2018 12:03:34 GMT 48:47 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/492246084 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-88-laura-vanderkam-off-the-clock Laura Vanderkam is the author of Off The Clock: F… full Laura Vanderkam is the author of Off The Clock: Feel Less Busy While Getting More Done as well as several other time management and productivity books, including such as I Know How She Does It: How Successful Women Make the Most of Their Time and What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast. She co-hosts, with Sarah Hart-Unger, the podcast Best of Both Worlds. Her TED talk, How to Gain Control of Your Free Time, has been viewed more than six million times. She lives outside Philadelphia with her husband and four children. Stew and Laura talk about how we perceive the amount of time we have, how spending time with friends and family affects our perception of time, the importance of scheduling in daily “vacations,” and ways to savor the good moments in order to expand time. Laura describes what she’s observed from her research on people who keep time logs and she provides practical tips for how we can use time not only to be more productive, but also to help us enjoy life more. Laura Vanderkam is the author of Off The Clock: Feel Less Busy While Getting More Done as well as several other time management and productivity books, including such as I Know How She Does It: How Successful Women Make the Most of Their Time and What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast. She co-hosts, with Sarah Hart-Unger, the podcast Best of Both Worlds. Her TED talk, How to Gain Control of Your Free Time, has been viewed more than six million times. She lives outside Philadelphia with her husband and four children. Stew and Laura talk about how we perceive the amount of time we have, how spending time with friends and family affects our perception of time, the importance of scheduling in daily “vacations,” and ways to savor the good moments in order to expand time. Laura describes what she’s observed from her research on people who keep time logs and she provides practical tips for how we can use time not only to be more productive, but also to help us enjoy life more. Ep 87. Nancy Rothstein: The Sleep Ambassador Ep 87. Nancy Rothstein: The Sleep Ambassador Wed, 22 Aug 2018 10:49:38 GMT 44:37 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/488992056 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-87-nancy-rothstein-the-sleep-ambassador Nancy Rothstein, a proud Penn alum, is known as … full Nancy Rothstein, a proud Penn alum, is known as The Sleep Ambassador. She is also Director of Corporate Sleep Programs at CIRCADIAN, a global company that provides 24/7 workforce performance and safety solutions for businesses that operate around the clock. Nancy, who earned her MBA from from the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, helps people make lasting shifts to optimize their sleep quality and quantity. As Director of CIRCADIAN® Corporate Sleep Programs, she consults to Fortune 500 corporations awakening leadership to the value of a good night’s sleep for their workforce and providing sleep education for employees at all levels. She also lectures on sleep to the medical and dental communities to encourage integrating relevant sleep information into their practice. Nancy is the author of My Daddy Snores. Stew and Nancy talk about the well-documented sequelae of sleep deprivation, which is now rampant in our society -- individual problems such as depression, weight gain, and heart disease; the ripple effects on our family members; and, for businesses, reduced productivity and workplace accidents -- to name a few. Nancy provides evidence-based tips for how to get better sleep in our lives and, in the second part of this episode, she talks to listeners of the radio show about their sleep. And Stew gets some advice about his napping strategy. More resources from The Sleep Ambassador. Nancy Rothstein, a proud Penn alum, is known as The Sleep Ambassador. She is also Director of Corporate Sleep Programs at CIRCADIAN, a global company that provides 24/7 workforce performance and safety solutions for businesses that operate around the clock. Nancy, who earned her MBA from from the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business, helps people make lasting shifts to optimize their sleep quality and quantity. As Director of CIRCADIAN® Corporate Sleep Programs, she consults to Fortune 500 corporations awakening leadership to the value of a good night’s sleep for their workforce and providing sleep education for employees at all levels. She also lectures on sleep to the medical and dental communities to encourage integrating relevant sleep information into their practice. Nancy is the author of My Daddy Snores. Stew and Nancy talk about the well-documented sequelae of sleep deprivation, which is now rampant in our society -- individual problems such as depression, weight gain, and heart disease; the ripple effects on our family members; and, for businesses, reduced productivity and workplace accidents -- to name a few. Nancy provides evidence-based tips for how to get better sleep in our lives and, in the second part of this episode, she talks to listeners of the radio show about their sleep. And Stew gets some advice about his napping strategy. More resources from The Sleep Ambassador. Ep 86. Guy Spier: A Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment Ep 86. Guy Spier: A Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment Wed, 15 Aug 2018 19:56:03 GMT 30:16 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/486023202 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-86-guy-spier-a-quest-for-wealth-wisdom-and-enlightenment Guy Spier is an investor based in Zurich. In June… full Ep 85. Morra Aarons Mele: The Hermit Entrepreneur Ep 85. Morra Aarons Mele: The Hermit Entrepreneur Wed, 08 Aug 2018 14:40:48 GMT 45:20 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/482795172 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-85-morra-aarons-mele-the-hermit-entrepreneur Morra Aarons-Mele is founder of the award-winning… full Ep 84. Herminia Ibarra: Act Like a Leader Ep 84. Herminia Ibarra: Act Like a Leader Wed, 01 Aug 2018 13:07:54 GMT 22:14 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/479665578 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-84-herminia-ibarra-act-like-a-leader Herminia Ibarra is the Charles Handy Professor of… full Herminia Ibarra is the Charles Handy Professor of Organizational Behavior at London Business School. Before that she was on the faculty at INSEAD and the Harvard Business School. She is a judge for the Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, and recognized by Thinkers 50 among the most influential management thinkers in the world. Her book Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader explains how to step up to a bigger leadership role. Her best-selling Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career describes how people reinvent their careers. Ibarra, who received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University, where she was a National Science Fellow, is a master educator and world-renowned scholar whose advice is sought by many organizations. Stew and Herminia, who go way back to grad school days, discuss the essentials in Act Like a Leader and the many ways one can cultivate and use a broad and diverse network to enhance one’s career. Ibarra contrasts this with what she calls the tendency many of us have to be narcissistic and lazy when it comes to growing the ongoing social support everyone needs to succeed as a leader. They talk about practical matters, like how to make bite- sized requests commensurate with the status of the relationship and how to expand your network outside of your immediate circle -- even if it’s uncomfortable to do so. Herminia Ibarra is the Charles Handy Professor of Organizational Behavior at London Business School. Before that she was on the faculty at INSEAD and the Harvard Business School. She is a judge for the Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, and recognized by Thinkers 50 among the most influential management thinkers in the world. Her book Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader explains how to step up to a bigger leadership role. Her best-selling Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career describes how people reinvent their careers. Ibarra, who received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University, where she was a National Science Fellow, is a master educator and world-renowned scholar whose advice is sought by many organizations. Stew and Herminia, who go way back to grad school days, discuss the essentials in Act Like a Leader and the many ways one can cultivate and use a broad and diverse network to enhance one’s career. Ibarra contrasts this with what she calls the tendency many of us have to be narcissistic and lazy when it comes to growing the ongoing social support everyone needs to succeed as a leader. They talk about practical matters, like how to make bite- sized requests commensurate with the status of the relationship and how to expand your network outside of your immediate circle -- even if it’s uncomfortable to do so. Ep 83. Neil Blumenthal: Sacred Time Ep 83. Neil Blumenthal: Sacred Time Wed, 25 Jul 2018 13:41:35 GMT 45:23 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/476517489 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-83-neil-blumenthal-sacred-time Neil Blumenthal is co-founder and co-CEO of Warby… full Neil Blumenthal is co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker, a lifestyle brand that offers designer eyewear at a low price with a focus on being socially conscious. Prior to launching Warby Parker in 2010, Neil served as director of VisionSpring, a nonprofit social enterprise that trains low-income women to start their own businesses selling affordable eyeglasses to individuals living on less than $4 per day in developing countries. In 2015, Fast Company named Warby Parker the most innovative company in the world. He was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company. Neil received his BA from Tufts University and his MBA here at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Stew and Neil have a wide-ranging talk about his time at Wharton, the importance of honest conversations to build trust, why continual learning by employees is essential to a thriving company, and the ways in which parenthood changes our relationship to time and work. Neil Blumenthal is co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker, a lifestyle brand that offers designer eyewear at a low price with a focus on being socially conscious. Prior to launching Warby Parker in 2010, Neil served as director of VisionSpring, a nonprofit social enterprise that trains low-income women to start their own businesses selling affordable eyeglasses to individuals living on less than $4 per day in developing countries. In 2015, Fast Company named Warby Parker the most innovative company in the world. He was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business by Fast Company. Neil received his BA from Tufts University and his MBA here at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Stew and Neil have a wide-ranging talk about his time at Wharton, the importance of honest conversations to build trust, why continual learning by employees is essential to a thriving company, and the ways in which parenthood changes our relationship to time and work. Ep 82. Susan Ashford: Thriving in Gig World Ep 82. Susan Ashford: Thriving in Gig World Wed, 18 Jul 2018 11:46:48 GMT 53:23 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/473317752 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-82-susan-ashford-thriving-in-gig-world Susan Ashford is Chair of the Management and Orga… full Susan Ashford is Chair of the Management and Organizations Group at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, where she holds the Michael and Susan Jandernoa Professorship in Management and Organization. Her passion is using her teaching and research to help people be maximally effective in their work settings. Her research has been published in a variety of top academic outlets as well as in the business media. In 2002, Sue was named a Fellow of the Academy of Management, recognizing the top 1% of scholars in a world-wide professional association of nearly 20,000 professors and practitioners interested in improving management scholarship, education, and practice. That association also awarded her the prestigious Career Achievement Award for Distinguished Scholarly Contributions to Management in 2017. Sue and Stew discuss how to make the gig economy work for you by cultivating connections to people as well as to place, establishing routines, and focusing on purpose. They talk about the pros and cons of working independently. In the second half of the conversation they delve into Sue’s highly practical research on feedback-seeking, seeing yourself as a leader no matter what your role, and engaging mindfully in the lifelong challenge of learning to lead. Susan Ashford is Chair of the Management and Organizations Group at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, where she holds the Michael and Susan Jandernoa Professorship in Management and Organization. Her passion is using her teaching and research to help people be maximally effective in their work settings. Her research has been published in a variety of top academic outlets as well as in the business media. In 2002, Sue was named a Fellow of the Academy of Management, recognizing the top 1% of scholars in a world-wide professional association of nearly 20,000 professors and practitioners interested in improving management scholarship, education, and practice. That association also awarded her the prestigious Career Achievement Award for Distinguished Scholarly Contributions to Management in 2017. Sue and Stew discuss how to make the gig economy work for you by cultivating connections to people as well as to place, establishing routines, and focusing on purpose. They talk about the pros and cons of working independently. In the second half of the conversation they delve into Sue’s highly practical research on feedback-seeking, seeing yourself as a leader no matter what your role, and engaging mindfully in the lifelong challenge of learning to lead. Ep 81. Keith Ferrazzi: Serve and Grow Ep 81. Keith Ferrazzi: Serve and Grow Wed, 11 Jul 2018 11:36:04 GMT 31:02 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/470198370 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-81-keith-ferrazzi-serve-and-grow Keith Ferrazzi is a New York Times best-selling a… full Keith Ferrazzi is a New York Times best-selling author, entrepreneur, and master networker. His research and consulting firm, Ferrazzi Greenlight, helps companies manage networks and relationships in order to reach strategic goals. He is the author of several books including Never Eat Alone which discusses the power of interpersonal relationships to stimulate personal growth and Who’s Got Your Back. Greenlight Giving, his foundation, does similar work through community service, building relationships by teaching those in need. Keith and Stew talk about the importance of relationships in all parts of life. Keith describes how stronger relationships can help an individual grow at home and at work. He also describes how these relationships can help a company internally as well as ultimately increasing its economic value. He details the ways in which service to those around you and to strangers in need can improve relationships in all parts of your life. Keith Ferrazzi is a New York Times best-selling author, entrepreneur, and master networker. His research and consulting firm, Ferrazzi Greenlight, helps companies manage networks and relationships in order to reach strategic goals. He is the author of several books including Never Eat Alone which discusses the power of interpersonal relationships to stimulate personal growth and Who’s Got Your Back. Greenlight Giving, his foundation, does similar work through community service, building relationships by teaching those in need. Keith and Stew talk about the importance of relationships in all parts of life. Keith describes how stronger relationships can help an individual grow at home and at work. He also describes how these relationships can help a company internally as well as ultimately increasing its economic value. He details the ways in which service to those around you and to strangers in need can improve relationships in all parts of your life. Ep 80. Yuri Kruman: What Millennials Want Ep 80. Yuri Kruman: What Millennials Want Wed, 04 Jul 2018 14:11:58 GMT 41:00 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/467208720 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-80-yuri-kruman-what-millennials-want Yuri Kruman is an experienced executive and manag… full Ep 79. Advocates For Paid Leave: Ellen Bravo, Sen. Joe Fain, Rep. Kaniela Ing Ep 79. Advocates For Paid Leave: Ellen Bravo, Sen. Joe Fain, Rep. Kaniela Ing Wed, 27 Jun 2018 10:43:32 GMT 50:36 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/464096697 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-79-ellen-bravo-paid-leave This week Stew speaks with three guests who are a… full This week Stew speaks with three guests who are all advocates of paid family leave: Ellen Bravo, Washington State Republican Senator Joe Fain, and Hawaii Democratic State Representative Kaniela Ing. Ellen Bravo is a founding director of Family Values @ Work, a network of coalitions in 27 states working for policies such as paid sick days and family and medical leave insurance. Before that, Ellen was director of 9to5, an organization improving working conditions and ensuring the rights of women. She has written several non-fiction books, including Taking on the Big Boys, or Why Feminism is Good for Families, Business and the Nation. Ellen served on the bipartisan Commission on Leave appointed by Congress to study the impact of the Family and Medical Leave Act. Among her commendations are a Ford Foundation Visionary award and, like Stew, she’s been honored with the Families and Work Institute Work-Life Legacy Award. Republican Senator Joe Fain of Washington State has an MBA and an undergraduate degree in Political Science. He’s been in the Senate since 2010 and has been both the Minority and Majority floor leader. Joe was the prime sponsor of the landmark legislation to create a statewide paid family and medical leave program by convening a bipartisan group of lawmakers and business and labor leaders. Representative Kaniela Ing, Democratic Representative from Hawaii has been fighting for working families he was a child in one. He’s been serving in the state legislature since he was 23 and he’s now running for Congress. The birth of his first child has brought the particular issue of paid family leave to the fore for him. Stew and Ellen discuss the accelerating pace of states enacting paid family leave laws and other legislative victories as well as Ky Dickens’ great new film, Zero Weeks, which is winning all sorts of awards. The film features six subjects with zero weeks of paid leave who need that support to care for themselves or loved ones with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses, to care for their parents, as well as to care for their new children. It is a powerful warning about the cost of doing nothing to help us become a nation that truly cares for working families. Ellen encourages everyone to visit the Family Values @ Work site to learn about what is going on in their state and local area and find ways to get involved and make their voices heard. They discuss how this is no longer a “women’s issue” as millennial dad’s are demanding to be involved at home. And it’s not simply a parental leave issue, as single people also need leave for themselves and to care for loved ones and as empty nesters, a growing portion of the population, are caring for aging parents and others. Paid family leave affects everyone. Stew and Ellen also talk about how this policy helps small business owners compete with larger corporations and how it is affordably funded. Senator Fain and Representative Ing share their compelling stories of becoming dads for the first time and the ways in which they’ve worked across the political aisle to build coalitions of support for a policy that affects everyone, benefits everyone, is good for business, and is not costly. This week Stew speaks with three guests who are all advocates of paid family leave: Ellen Bravo, Washington State Republican Senator Joe Fain, and Hawaii Democratic State Representative Kaniela Ing. Ellen Bravo is a founding director of Family Values @ Work, a network of coalitions in 27 states working for policies such as paid sick days and family and medical leave insurance. Before that, Ellen was director of 9to5, an organization improving working conditions and ensuring the rights of women. She has written several non-fiction books, including Taking on the Big Boys, or Why Feminism is Good for Families, Business and the Nation. Ellen served on the bipartisan Commission on Leave appointed by Congress to study the impact of the Family and Medical Leave Act. Among her commendations are a Ford Foundation Visionary award and, like Stew, she’s been honored with the Families and Work Institute Work-Life Legacy Award. Republican Senator Joe Fain of Washington State has an MBA and an undergraduate degree in Political Science. He’s been in the Senate since 2010 and has been both the Minority and Majority floor leader. Joe was the prime sponsor of the landmark legislation to create a statewide paid family and medical leave program by convening a bipartisan group of lawmakers and business and labor leaders. Representative Kaniela Ing, Democratic Representative from Hawaii has been fighting for working families he was a child in one. He’s been serving in the state legislature since he was 23 and he’s now running for Congress. The birth of his first child has brought the particular issue of paid family leave to the fore for him. Stew and Ellen discuss the accelerating pace of states enacting paid family leave laws and other legislative victories as well as Ky Dickens’ great new film, Zero Weeks, which is winning all sorts of awards. The film features six subjects with zero weeks of paid leave who need that support to care for themselves or loved ones with cancer and other life-threatening illnesses, to care for their parents, as well as to care for their new children. It is a powerful warning about the cost of doing nothing to help us become a nation that truly cares for working families. Ellen encourages everyone to visit the Family Values @ Work site to learn about what is going on in their state and local area and find ways to get involved and make their voices heard. They discuss how this is no longer a “women’s issue” as millennial dad’s are demanding to be involved at home. And it’s not simply a parental leave issue, as single people also need leave for themselves and to care for loved ones and as empty nesters, a growing portion of the population, are caring for aging parents and others. Paid family leave affects everyone. Stew and Ellen also talk about how this policy helps small business owners compete with larger corporations and how it is affordably funded. Senator Fain and Representative Ing share their compelling stories of becoming dads for the first time and the ways in which they’ve worked across the political aisle to build coalitions of support for a policy that affects everyone, benefits everyone, is good for business, and is not costly. Ep 78. Leah Weiss: How We Work Ep 78. Leah Weiss: How We Work Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:25:21 GMT 48:37 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/460895814 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-78-leah-weiss-how-we-work Dr. Leah Weiss is author of How We Work: Live You… full <![CDATA[Ep 77. Dan Calista: Vynamic's Health Culture]]> Wed, 13 Jun 2018 14:08:00 GMT 21:48 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/457793832 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-77-dan-calista-vynamics-health-culture Dan Calista is founder and CEO of Vynamic, named … full Dan Calista is founder and CEO of Vynamic, named #1 boutique consulting firm, as well as Best Small Firm and Best Places to Work. Vynamic is the Philadelphia area’s largest management consulting firm focused exclusively on the healthcare industry. Dan has created a work culture that emphasizes the happiness and health of his team members as well as his clients. He walks the talk and the result is that all stakeholders win. Stew and Dan talk about the various ways Vynamic invests in the whole lives of people in the organization, including a policy that enables members to set real boundaries between work and the rest of life. Vynamic has a “Z-Mail” policy; the Z stands for catching some Z’s, sleep. Z-mail hours are 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. and it’s the norm not to send emails during those hours. At Vynamic, values drive decision-making and it’s been a good investment, one that’s paid off in their ability to perform well as a business. Dan’s puts his philosophy this way: We’re “growing for our people and not at the expense of our people.” Dan Calista is founder and CEO of Vynamic, named #1 boutique consulting firm, as well as Best Small Firm and Best Places to Work. Vynamic is the Philadelphia area’s largest management consulting firm focused exclusively on the healthcare industry. Dan has created a work culture that emphasizes the happiness and health of his team members as well as his clients. He walks the talk and the result is that all stakeholders win. Stew and Dan talk about the various ways Vynamic invests in the whole lives of people in the organization, including a policy that enables members to set real boundaries between work and the rest of life. Vynamic has a “Z-Mail” policy; the Z stands for catching some Z’s, sleep. Z-mail hours are 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. and it’s the norm not to send emails during those hours. At Vynamic, values drive decision-making and it’s been a good investment, one that’s paid off in their ability to perform well as a business. Dan’s puts his philosophy this way: We’re “growing for our people and not at the expense of our people.” Ep 76. Maggie Jackson: The Erosion of Attention Ep 76. Maggie Jackson: The Erosion of Attention Wed, 06 Jun 2018 12:57:37 GMT 38:31 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/454590414 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-76-maggie-jackson-the-erosion-of-attention Maggie Jackson is an award-winning author and for… full Maggie Jackson is an award-winning author and former Boston Globe columnist known for her penetrating coverage of social issues, especially technology’s impact on humanity. Her essays and articles have appeared in publications worldwide, including the The New York Times, Business Week, Utne, and on National Public Radio. One of her most popular books is Distracted: The Erosion of Attention and the Coming Dark Age which jumpstarted our global conversation on the steep costs of fragmenting our attention. Stew and Maggie discuss these costs and their consequences. Maggie believes this fragmentation is such a destructive force that there is a coming dark age, an age where the quality of communication drops dramatically. One of the best ways to curb the negative effects of technology is to simply talk about it with family members and coworkers, then takes steps to create workable boundaries, to allow for undistracted time. Maggie explores other solutions too in this engaging conversation. You can find a transcript here. Maggie Jackson is an award-winning author and former Boston Globe columnist known for her penetrating coverage of social issues, especially technology’s impact on humanity. Her essays and articles have appeared in publications worldwide, including the The New York Times, Business Week, Utne, and on National Public Radio. One of her most popular books is Distracted: The Erosion of Attention and the Coming Dark Age which jumpstarted our global conversation on the steep costs of fragmenting our attention. Stew and Maggie discuss these costs and their consequences. Maggie believes this fragmentation is such a destructive force that there is a coming dark age, an age where the quality of communication drops dramatically. One of the best ways to curb the negative effects of technology is to simply talk about it with family members and coworkers, then takes steps to create workable boundaries, to allow for undistracted time. Maggie explores other solutions too in this engaging conversation. You can find a transcript here. Ep 75. Maurice Schweitzer: When to Compete, When to Cooperate Ep 75. Maurice Schweitzer: When to Compete, When to Cooperate Tue, 29 May 2018 23:33:04 GMT 25:33 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/450982662 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-75-maurice-schweitzer-when-to-compete-when-to-cooperate Maurice Schweitzer is the Cecilia Yen Koo Profess… full Ep 74. Susan David: Becoming Emotionally Agile Ep 74. Susan David: Becoming Emotionally Agile Wed, 23 May 2018 22:40:15 GMT 43:37 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/448267551 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-74-susan-david-becoming-emotionally-agile Susan David is the author of the bestselling book… full Susan David is the author of the bestselling book Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life. She is one of the world’s leading management thinkers and an award winning Harvard Medical School psychologist. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and guest on national radio and television. She was named on the Thinkers50 Radar list of people shaping the future of organizations and management. Susan is CEO of Evidence Based Psychology and Cofounder of the Institute of Coaching (a Harvard Medical School/McLean affiliate). She serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of Thrive Global and Virgin Pulse. Susan and Stew talk about embracing emotions rather than pushing them away or putting on a happy face. Susan describes and illustrates her four key concepts of emotional agility that help us deal effectively and constructively with life’s daily travails as well as its greater challenges. They discuss the importance of simply facing the issues, not ignoring them; of taking an objective, detached, analytic view of your own situation; of understanding what’s truly important to you personally; and of adjusting your perspective and making conscious deliberate choices. You can take her quiz to help you discern your values and get started on aligning them with your everyday actions. Susan David is the author of the bestselling book Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life. She is one of the world’s leading management thinkers and an award winning Harvard Medical School psychologist. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and guest on national radio and television. She was named on the Thinkers50 Radar list of people shaping the future of organizations and management. Susan is CEO of Evidence Based Psychology and Cofounder of the Institute of Coaching (a Harvard Medical School/McLean affiliate). She serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards of Thrive Global and Virgin Pulse. Susan and Stew talk about embracing emotions rather than pushing them away or putting on a happy face. Susan describes and illustrates her four key concepts of emotional agility that help us deal effectively and constructively with life’s daily travails as well as its greater challenges. They discuss the importance of simply facing the issues, not ignoring them; of taking an objective, detached, analytic view of your own situation; of understanding what’s truly important to you personally; and of adjusting your perspective and making conscious deliberate choices. You can take her quiz to help you discern your values and get started on aligning them with your everyday actions. Ep 73. Laine Joelson Cohen: The Coaching Advantage Ep 73. Laine Joelson Cohen: The Coaching Advantage Wed, 16 May 2018 12:30:02 GMT 44:03 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/444558759 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-73-laine-joelson-cohen-the-coaching-advantage Laine Joelson Cohen is Director of Leadership and… full Laine Joelson Cohen is Director of Leadership and Executive Development at Citigroup. Leading teams has been the cornerstone of her career. After 20 years working in diverse HR roles, Laine decided to follow her passion for coaching and developing people and became Citi’s North America Director of Leadership, Executive and Professional Development. Laine was recently named to Marshall Goldsmith “100 Coaches” group. She believes leadership happens in small, everyday moments and that each of us has the potential to exhibit leadership by being mindful of these opportunities and making deliberate choices. She holds an M.B.A. in Human Resources Management from the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Connecticut. Stew and Laine talk about how to effectively coach others, how to be coached well, how to provide useful feedback, and the importance of networking in a way that doesn’t feel icky. They discuss the difficulties people have in developing these skills and Laine offers practical tips for overcoming these challenges to improve performance in all parts of your life. Laine Joelson Cohen is Director of Leadership and Executive Development at Citigroup. Leading teams has been the cornerstone of her career. After 20 years working in diverse HR roles, Laine decided to follow her passion for coaching and developing people and became Citi’s North America Director of Leadership, Executive and Professional Development. Laine was recently named to Marshall Goldsmith “100 Coaches” group. She believes leadership happens in small, everyday moments and that each of us has the potential to exhibit leadership by being mindful of these opportunities and making deliberate choices. She holds an M.B.A. in Human Resources Management from the Zicklin School of Business at Baruch College and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Connecticut. Stew and Laine talk about how to effectively coach others, how to be coached well, how to provide useful feedback, and the importance of networking in a way that doesn’t feel icky. They discuss the difficulties people have in developing these skills and Laine offers practical tips for overcoming these challenges to improve performance in all parts of your life. Ep 72. Due Quach: Supporting First-Generation Collegians with Calm Clarity Ep 72. Due Quach: Supporting First-Generation Collegians with Calm Clarity Wed, 09 May 2018 12:49:17 GMT 46:58 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/441570825 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-72-due-quach-supporting-first-generation-collegians Due Quach is the founder and CEO of Calm Clarity … full Due Quach is the founder and CEO of Calm Clarity and author of Calm Clarity: How to Use Science to Rewire Your Brain for Greater Wisdom, Fulfillment and Joy. Due was a refugee from Vietnam, a graduate of Harvard College and also of the Wharton MBA program (Class of 2006). She overcame the long-term effects of poverty and trauma by turning to neuroscience and meditation. After building a successful international business career in management consulting and private equity investments, she studied various contemplative traditions in India and other parts of Asia to create the Calm Clarity Program, which makes mindful leadership accessible to people of all backgrounds. She now leads Calm Clarity workshops in inner-city high schools, university lecture halls, and corporate executive board rooms alike. Due is also the founding chair and executive director of the Collective Success Network, a nonprofit that supports low-income, first-generation college students in achieving their academic, personal, and professional aspirations by connecting them with mentor role-models. Stew and Due discuss the burgeoning research on meditation, calming the mind, and the brain. And they explore how calming techniques affect us at work and in the rest of our lives. Due shares her riveting, harrowing story of climbing out of poverty and deprivation, feeling out of place at Harvard, not knowing how to manage success, learning how the brain reacts to trauma and privation, and discovering how to calm her own brain and find clarity. They talk about her mission to help others find a path from deprivation to success through a mentoring network she’s building and her teaching a practical method for how to gain calm clarity and the strength to persevere. Due Quach is the founder and CEO of Calm Clarity and author of Calm Clarity: How to Use Science to Rewire Your Brain for Greater Wisdom, Fulfillment and Joy. Due was a refugee from Vietnam, a graduate of Harvard College and also of the Wharton MBA program (Class of 2006). She overcame the long-term effects of poverty and trauma by turning to neuroscience and meditation. After building a successful international business career in management consulting and private equity investments, she studied various contemplative traditions in India and other parts of Asia to create the Calm Clarity Program, which makes mindful leadership accessible to people of all backgrounds. She now leads Calm Clarity workshops in inner-city high schools, university lecture halls, and corporate executive board rooms alike. Due is also the founding chair and executive director of the Collective Success Network, a nonprofit that supports low-income, first-generation college students in achieving their academic, personal, and professional aspirations by connecting them with mentor role-models. Stew and Due discuss the burgeoning research on meditation, calming the mind, and the brain. And they explore how calming techniques affect us at work and in the rest of our lives. Due shares her riveting, harrowing story of climbing out of poverty and deprivation, feeling out of place at Harvard, not knowing how to manage success, learning how the brain reacts to trauma and privation, and discovering how to calm her own brain and find clarity. They talk about her mission to help others find a path from deprivation to success through a mentoring network she’s building and her teaching a practical method for how to gain calm clarity and the strength to persevere. Ep 71. David Burkus: Friend of a Friend Ep 71. David Burkus: Friend of a Friend Wed, 02 May 2018 13:23:33 GMT 30:11 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/438271287 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-71-david-burkus-friend-of-a-friend David Burkus is a best-selling author and associa… full David Burkus is a best-selling author and associate professor of leadership and innovation at Oral Roberts University. His latest book, Friend of a Friend: Understanding the Hidden Networks That Can Transform Your Life and Your Career, offers a new perspective on how to grow networks and build key connections—one based on the science of human behavior, not rote networking advice. His TED talk has been viewed over 1.8 million times and he is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review. Stew and David talk about how most people find networking and mixers uncomfortable at best; networking can make people feel actually dirty. David has reviewed and distilled the research literature on social capital and he offers something other than the cookie-cutter advice that can feel inauthentic. He recommends exploring the edges of one’s hidden or neglected network -- one’s weak and dormant ties -- and getting to know people in multifaceted ways by being genuinely curious about their lives rather than by pursuing purely instrumental, career-related questions. They discuss methods and tools for cultivating networks of support, including Contactually, which David uses to let him know when he has not contacted someone. Check out Stew’s earlier conversation with David about his previous book, Under New Management. David Burkus is a best-selling author and associate professor of leadership and innovation at Oral Roberts University. His latest book, Friend of a Friend: Understanding the Hidden Networks That Can Transform Your Life and Your Career, offers a new perspective on how to grow networks and build key connections—one based on the science of human behavior, not rote networking advice. His TED talk has been viewed over 1.8 million times and he is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review. Stew and David talk about how most people find networking and mixers uncomfortable at best; networking can make people feel actually dirty. David has reviewed and distilled the research literature on social capital and he offers something other than the cookie-cutter advice that can feel inauthentic. He recommends exploring the edges of one’s hidden or neglected network -- one’s weak and dormant ties -- and getting to know people in multifaceted ways by being genuinely curious about their lives rather than by pursuing purely instrumental, career-related questions. They discuss methods and tools for cultivating networks of support, including Contactually, which David uses to let him know when he has not contacted someone. Check out Stew’s earlier conversation with David about his previous book, Under New Management. Ep 70. Whitney Johnson: Keep Everyone Learning Ep 70. Whitney Johnson: Keep Everyone Learning Wed, 25 Apr 2018 12:18:38 GMT 32:56 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/434922414 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-70-whitney-johnson-keep-everyone-learning Whitney Johnson’s research and work in disruptive… full Ep 69. Stephen Klasko: The Emotional Intelligence of Doctors Ep 69. Stephen Klasko: The Emotional Intelligence of Doctors Wed, 18 Apr 2018 13:14:50 GMT 27:23 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/431551671 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-69-stephen-klasko-the-emotional-intelligence-of-doctors Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA is President and CEO o… full Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA is President and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health. Prior to joining Jefferson, Dr. Klasko was CEO of USF Health and Dean of the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida. He also served as Dean of the College of Medicine at Drexel University and CEO of Drexel University Physicians. He is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Healthcare Transformation, author of The Phantom Stethoscope: A Field Manual for an Optimistic Future in Medicine, and a sought-after speaker on the transformation of clinical practice, healthcare information technology and physician leadership. In this conversation, Stew and Stephen talk about innovation in healthcare. Stephen is convinced that doctors need to transform the way they interact with patients in order to transform medicine. Currently, the medical profession is competitive, hierarchical, and non-creative. Doctors lack the empathy, teamwork skills, and creativity needed to address issues many patients face. Stephen is working to change this culture at Jefferson Medical School by admitting medical students for not only GPA and MCAT scores but Emotional Intelligence scores. This effort will result in better outcomes for patients and harmony between work and the rest of life for doctors. Listen and learn about these and other innovative approaches to preparing the next generation of doctors and what these changes might mean for your life. Stephen K. Klasko, MD, MBA is President and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health. Prior to joining Jefferson, Dr. Klasko was CEO of USF Health and Dean of the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida. He also served as Dean of the College of Medicine at Drexel University and CEO of Drexel University Physicians. He is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Healthcare Transformation, author of The Phantom Stethoscope: A Field Manual for an Optimistic Future in Medicine, and a sought-after speaker on the transformation of clinical practice, healthcare information technology and physician leadership. In this conversation, Stew and Stephen talk about innovation in healthcare. Stephen is convinced that doctors need to transform the way they interact with patients in order to transform medicine. Currently, the medical profession is competitive, hierarchical, and non-creative. Doctors lack the empathy, teamwork skills, and creativity needed to address issues many patients face. Stephen is working to change this culture at Jefferson Medical School by admitting medical students for not only GPA and MCAT scores but Emotional Intelligence scores. This effort will result in better outcomes for patients and harmony between work and the rest of life for doctors. Listen and learn about these and other innovative approaches to preparing the next generation of doctors and what these changes might mean for your life. Ep 68. Sarah Green Carmichael: Women at Work Ep 68. Sarah Green Carmichael: Women at Work Wed, 11 Apr 2018 13:50:45 GMT 31:08 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/428156139 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-68-sarah-green-carmichael-women-at-work Sarah Green Carmichael is an Executive Editor at … full Sarah Green Carmichael is an Executive Editor at Harvard Business Review (she’s been Stew’s editor for a decade). She hosts the long-running HBR IdeaCast and co-hosts its new podcast, Women at Work. Stew and Sarah discuss some hot topics that concern women at work, including how men and women communicate differently and why women are heard less than men; #MeToo and its backlash; and best practices for managing the complex dynamics of working couples (find out why you want a ”loving kick” from your significant other). Sarah Green Carmichael is an Executive Editor at Harvard Business Review (she’s been Stew’s editor for a decade). She hosts the long-running HBR IdeaCast and co-hosts its new podcast, Women at Work. Stew and Sarah discuss some hot topics that concern women at work, including how men and women communicate differently and why women are heard less than men; #MeToo and its backlash; and best practices for managing the complex dynamics of working couples (find out why you want a ”loving kick” from your significant other). Ep 67. Morten Hansen: Do Less, Achieve More Ep 67. Morten Hansen: Do Less, Achieve More Wed, 04 Apr 2018 13:33:43 GMT 32:47 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/424671129 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-67-morten-hansen-do-less-achieve-more Morten Hansen is a management professor at the Un… full Morten Hansen is a management professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a faculty member at Apple University. Professor Hansen holds a PhD from Stanford Business School, where he was a Fulbright scholar. His academic research has won several prestigious awards and (like Stew) he is ranked as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers by Thinkers50. He was also a manager at the Boston Consulting Group, where he advised corporate clients worldwide. His other books are Great by Choice and Collaboration. Stew and Morten discuss his book Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More, which reports results and practical implications for action of a large-scale study. They talk about how time spent on work is not the best indicator of productivity or satisfaction. They explore the importance of being selective and finding creative ways to say “no”; of honing in obsessively to produce excellence in what you do choose to do; and of pursuing not just your passion, but work that has purpose and enables you to contribute value. Morten Hansen is a management professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a faculty member at Apple University. Professor Hansen holds a PhD from Stanford Business School, where he was a Fulbright scholar. His academic research has won several prestigious awards and (like Stew) he is ranked as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers by Thinkers50. He was also a manager at the Boston Consulting Group, where he advised corporate clients worldwide. His other books are Great by Choice and Collaboration. Stew and Morten discuss his book Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More, which reports results and practical implications for action of a large-scale study. They talk about how time spent on work is not the best indicator of productivity or satisfaction. They explore the importance of being selective and finding creative ways to say “no”; of honing in obsessively to produce excellence in what you do choose to do; and of pursuing not just your passion, but work that has purpose and enables you to contribute value. Ep 66. Jordan Bookey: Chief Mom at Zoobean Ep 66. Jordan Bookey: Chief Mom at Zoobean Wed, 28 Mar 2018 12:40:13 GMT 31:39 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/421297449 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-66-jordan-bookey-chief-mom-at-zoobean Jordan Lloyd Bookey is an alum of the Wharton MBA… full Jordan Lloyd Bookey is an alum of the Wharton MBA program, a former student of Stew’s, and Chief Mom and Co-Founder of Zoobean, a service that helps families discover children’s books and apps at home or their local library. Before she decided to make the leap into entrepreneurship, Jordan led teams at Google that focused on education and childhood development. As a speaker, educator, and mom, she is passionate about innovations in education, technology, and startups. She was featured on ABC’s Shark Tank and won $250,000 from Mark Cuban, and she was named one of Wharton’s 40 Under 40. Stew and Jordan talk about the challenges and insights she gleaned from starting a social enterprise with her husband, Felix Lloyd. Jordan describes how partners who work together must carve out special time to focus on themselves and their individual needs. Working with one’s wife, husband, or partner can be especially difficult because you share every aspect of life; family, work, and community. There are many ways to integrate this special combination of work and life by setting aside time for date nights, spending time with friends, and prioritizing your own health and wellness by means of exercise and self-care. Bonus for this episode: Read the transcript here. Jordan Lloyd Bookey is an alum of the Wharton MBA program, a former student of Stew’s, and Chief Mom and Co-Founder of Zoobean, a service that helps families discover children’s books and apps at home or their local library. Before she decided to make the leap into entrepreneurship, Jordan led teams at Google that focused on education and childhood development. As a speaker, educator, and mom, she is passionate about innovations in education, technology, and startups. She was featured on ABC’s Shark Tank and won $250,000 from Mark Cuban, and she was named one of Wharton’s 40 Under 40. Stew and Jordan talk about the challenges and insights she gleaned from starting a social enterprise with her husband, Felix Lloyd. Jordan describes how partners who work together must carve out special time to focus on themselves and their individual needs. Working with one’s wife, husband, or partner can be especially difficult because you share every aspect of life; family, work, and community. There are many ways to integrate this special combination of work and life by setting aside time for date nights, spending time with friends, and prioritizing your own health and wellness by means of exercise and self-care. Bonus for this episode: Read the transcript here. Ep 65. Jeffrey Pfeffer: Is Your Work Killing You? Ep 65. Jeffrey Pfeffer: Is Your Work Killing You? Wed, 21 Mar 2018 13:11:11 GMT 34:00 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/417031545 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-65-jeffrey-pfeffer-is-your-work-killing-you Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor… full Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University where he has taught since 1979. He is the author or co-author of 15 books, including Leadership B.S, which he talked about on this program. He serves on the board of directors of Berlin Packaging, on the advisory board for Collective Health, and on the board of the nonprofit Quantum Leap Healthcare. Jeff has won the Richard D. Irwin Award from the Academy of Management for scholarly contributions to management, and numerous awards for his articles and books. Stew and Jeff talk about his bold and critically important 2018 book, Dying for a Paycheck: How Modern Management Harms Employee Health and Company Performance -- And What We Can Do About It. They discuss the stress and strain experienced by employees and their families as a result of overwork and other sources of toxicity in today’s workplaces, and their effects: weight gain, alcohol and drug abuse, excessive smoking, cardiovascular disease, anxiety, depression, and death. They explore how to make today’s workplace environments more sustainable, providing examples of humane organizations, descriptions of needed social policy changes, and calls to action to which any one of us can respond. Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University where he has taught since 1979. He is the author or co-author of 15 books, including Leadership B.S, which he talked about on this program. He serves on the board of directors of Berlin Packaging, on the advisory board for Collective Health, and on the board of the nonprofit Quantum Leap Healthcare. Jeff has won the Richard D. Irwin Award from the Academy of Management for scholarly contributions to management, and numerous awards for his articles and books. Stew and Jeff talk about his bold and critically important 2018 book, Dying for a Paycheck: How Modern Management Harms Employee Health and Company Performance -- And What We Can Do About It. They discuss the stress and strain experienced by employees and their families as a result of overwork and other sources of toxicity in today’s workplaces, and their effects: weight gain, alcohol and drug abuse, excessive smoking, cardiovascular disease, anxiety, depression, and death. They explore how to make today’s workplace environments more sustainable, providing examples of humane organizations, descriptions of needed social policy changes, and calls to action to which any one of us can respond. Ep 64. Jessica Bennett: Feminist Fight Club Ep 64. Jessica Bennett: Feminist Fight Club Wed, 14 Mar 2018 14:37:35 GMT 31:01 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/413555781 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-64-jessica-bennett-feminist-fight-club Jessica Bennett is gender editor at The New York … full Jessica Bennett is gender editor at The New York Times, where she works to expand global coverage of women and gender across platforms. She is author of Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace. The book was inspired by sexism she experienced as a junior writer early in her career. She had to learn how to work with men who were often given an unfair advantage, like getting credit for her ideas. Stew and Jessica discuss how Jessica formed the original feminist fight club, which was kept a secret at the start. The support and strength she found in this group led her to write her engaging and very practical book. Jessica uses humor, especially word play, to indicate to men when they have acted inappropriately. For example, “manteruption” occurs when a man speaks over a woman and “bropropriated” is when a man takes credit for a woman’s idea. The intent is to create real conversation infused with humanity about the many subtle, sexist actions that impede social progress toward an egalitarian world. Jessica Bennett is gender editor at The New York Times, where she works to expand global coverage of women and gender across platforms. She is author of Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace. The book was inspired by sexism she experienced as a junior writer early in her career. She had to learn how to work with men who were often given an unfair advantage, like getting credit for her ideas. Stew and Jessica discuss how Jessica formed the original feminist fight club, which was kept a secret at the start. The support and strength she found in this group led her to write her engaging and very practical book. Jessica uses humor, especially word play, to indicate to men when they have acted inappropriately. For example, “manteruption” occurs when a man speaks over a woman and “bropropriated” is when a man takes credit for a woman’s idea. The intent is to create real conversation infused with humanity about the many subtle, sexist actions that impede social progress toward an egalitarian world. Ep 63. Ellen Galinsky: Making Life Better for Parents and Children Ep 63. Ellen Galinsky: Making Life Better for Parents and Children Wed, 07 Mar 2018 14:28:38 GMT 50:49 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/410028072 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-63-ellen-galinsky-making-life-better-for-parents-children Ellen Galinsky is the Chief Science Officer at th… full Ellen Galinsky is the Chief Science Officer at the Bezos Family Foundation where she also serves as executive director of a program called Mind in the Making. In addition, she’s Senior Research Advisor for the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Ellen has decades of experience identifying important societal questions as they emerge, conducting research to seek answers, and turning the findings into action. For example, in Six Stages of Parenthood she chronicled her study of how parents grow and change as adults. She helped to establish the field of work-life in the 1980s and co-founded Families and Work Institute (FWI) in 1989, and has been its President since 1996. She wrote the best-selling book, Mind in the Making; her research on young people dropping out of the learning process. Mind in the Making is a national initiative to share research on the development of young children. Stew and Ellen talk about the current state of working families in America, childcare, parental leave, and what children and parents need from employers and society. Ellen offers tips for how to help children, which can be found at VROOM, an app that has activities to do with kids during bedtime, bath time, and other times. She also describes the tools and research available at WhenWorkWorks, a greater resource for working parents. Ellen Galinsky is the Chief Science Officer at the Bezos Family Foundation where she also serves as executive director of a program called Mind in the Making. In addition, she’s Senior Research Advisor for the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Ellen has decades of experience identifying important societal questions as they emerge, conducting research to seek answers, and turning the findings into action. For example, in Six Stages of Parenthood she chronicled her study of how parents grow and change as adults. She helped to establish the field of work-life in the 1980s and co-founded Families and Work Institute (FWI) in 1989, and has been its President since 1996. She wrote the best-selling book, Mind in the Making; her research on young people dropping out of the learning process. Mind in the Making is a national initiative to share research on the development of young children. Stew and Ellen talk about the current state of working families in America, childcare, parental leave, and what children and parents need from employers and society. Ellen offers tips for how to help children, which can be found at VROOM, an app that has activities to do with kids during bedtime, bath time, and other times. She also describes the tools and research available at WhenWorkWorks, a greater resource for working parents. Ep 62. Jenna Fisher: The Life of a Leader in Executive Search Ep 62. Jenna Fisher: The Life of a Leader in Executive Search Wed, 28 Feb 2018 13:35:47 GMT 46:46 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/406469406 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-62-jenna-fisher-life-of-a-leader-in-executive-search Jenna Fisher is Global Corporate Officers Sector … full Jenna Fisher is Global Corporate Officers Sector Leader for the executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates and she was a student in Stew’s Total Leadership class at Wharton about 15 years ago. Jenna specializes in leading senior financial officer assignments, serving clients across various sectors, including the technology, consumer, healthcare and retail industries. Her clients include Fortune 1000 corporations, middle-market private equity portfolio companies, as well as highly visible, pre-public venture capital-backed enterprises. The majority of her work over the past ten years has been recruiting CFOs, although she has conducted numerous assignments for treasurers, controllers, internal audit executives and division chief financial officers. Jenna is also involved at the board level, recruiting financial experts to serve on Audit Committees. She is based in San Francisco. Stew and Jenna talk about what an executive search consultant does and about how to conduct a successful job search by leveraging your network, knowing what you are truly looking for in your career, finding your distinctive gift and being excellent at it, and bringing your family into your career decision-making. Jenna Fisher is Global Corporate Officers Sector Leader for the executive search firm Russell Reynolds Associates and she was a student in Stew’s Total Leadership class at Wharton about 15 years ago. Jenna specializes in leading senior financial officer assignments, serving clients across various sectors, including the technology, consumer, healthcare and retail industries. Her clients include Fortune 1000 corporations, middle-market private equity portfolio companies, as well as highly visible, pre-public venture capital-backed enterprises. The majority of her work over the past ten years has been recruiting CFOs, although she has conducted numerous assignments for treasurers, controllers, internal audit executives and division chief financial officers. Jenna is also involved at the board level, recruiting financial experts to serve on Audit Committees. She is based in San Francisco. Stew and Jenna talk about what an executive search consultant does and about how to conduct a successful job search by leveraging your network, knowing what you are truly looking for in your career, finding your distinctive gift and being excellent at it, and bringing your family into your career decision-making. Ep 61. Christine Porath: Workplace Civility Ep 61. Christine Porath: Workplace Civility Wed, 21 Feb 2018 14:09:11 GMT 48:58 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/402977955 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-61-christine-porath-workplace-civility Christine Porath is an Associate Professor at the… full Christine Porath is an Associate Professor at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University and author of Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace. Christine also consults with organizations to help them create a thriving workplace. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Psychology Today, and has written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post. Her research has appeared in many journals and books. She is co-author of another book, The Cost of Bad Behavior, and a former two-sport Division I athlete. Christine and Stew talk about the rise in incivility at work and in our society -- a serious problem, about which we can all do something. They enumerate the emotional and financial costs of rude behavior at work and how it spills over into other parts of our lives. They explore practical, evidence-based strategies you can use for dealing with slights, discourteousness, and worse at work, whether you are boss or subordinate. Christine Porath is an Associate Professor at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University and author of Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace. Christine also consults with organizations to help them create a thriving workplace. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Psychology Today, and has written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post. Her research has appeared in many journals and books. She is co-author of another book, The Cost of Bad Behavior, and a former two-sport Division I athlete. Christine and Stew talk about the rise in incivility at work and in our society -- a serious problem, about which we can all do something. They enumerate the emotional and financial costs of rude behavior at work and how it spills over into other parts of our lives. They explore practical, evidence-based strategies you can use for dealing with slights, discourteousness, and worse at work, whether you are boss or subordinate. Ep. 60. Barry Schwartz: Making Work Meaningful Ep. 60. Barry Schwartz: Making Work Meaningful Wed, 14 Feb 2018 12:52:29 GMT 25:37 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/399471108 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-60-barry-schwartz-making-work-meaningful Barry Schwartz, the Dorwin Cartwright Professor … full Barry Schwartz, the Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Social Action (Emeritus), has been at Swarthmore College since receiving his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. He’s author of 10 books and 100s of articles and is well known for both his scholarship and his ability to bring complex sociological and psychological research to bear on the practical matters we all face in our daily lives at work and at home. Schwartz has written The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, named one of the top business books of the year by both Business Week and Forbes, and, with Ken Sharpe, Practical Wisdom, about which he gave a TED talk viewed by more than 2MM people. In this episode, Stew and Barry discuss Barry’s most recent book, Why We Work, including a brief review of the history of work. Many companies adhere to the ideology that employees only care about compensation and so that is all that matters; in this view, quality and meaningfulness of work are irrelevant. Barry’s optimism about this changing springs from his observations of the Millennials and women who are convincing companies that factors like social interactions and variety of work are just as important as compensation. Listen and learn from one of the world’s leading experts about how more enlightened philosophies of work are emerging and what this means for our future. Click here for the transcript. Barry Schwartz, the Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Social Action (Emeritus), has been at Swarthmore College since receiving his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. He’s author of 10 books and 100s of articles and is well known for both his scholarship and his ability to bring complex sociological and psychological research to bear on the practical matters we all face in our daily lives at work and at home. Schwartz has written The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, named one of the top business books of the year by both Business Week and Forbes, and, with Ken Sharpe, Practical Wisdom, about which he gave a TED talk viewed by more than 2MM people. In this episode, Stew and Barry discuss Barry’s most recent book, Why We Work, including a brief review of the history of work. Many companies adhere to the ideology that employees only care about compensation and so that is all that matters; in this view, quality and meaningfulness of work are irrelevant. Barry’s optimism about this changing springs from his observations of the Millennials and women who are convincing companies that factors like social interactions and variety of work are just as important as compensation. Listen and learn from one of the world’s leading experts about how more enlightened philosophies of work are emerging and what this means for our future. Click here for the transcript. <![CDATA[Ep 59. Lisa Buckingham: It's Your Career, Dammit!]]> Wed, 07 Feb 2018 11:53:35 GMT 46:57 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/395784192 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-59-lisa-buckingham-its-your-career-dammit Lisa Buckingham is Executive Vice President and C… full Lisa Buckingham is Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer at Lincoln Financial Group with more than 30 years of experience in all aspects of human resources management. In addition to all HR practices and policies for Lincoln Financial Group Lisa is also responsible for overseeing the corporation’s brand and enterprise communications, consumer insights and corporate social responsibility activities. In October 2017, she was named HR Executive of the Year by HR Executive Magazine. She serves on a number of boards including the Eagles Charitable Foundation and she Chairs the Lincoln Foundation. Stew and Lisa talk about the changes and challenges facing today’s Human Resources leaders, the importance of active listening, counseling people out of the wrong job, and taking responsibility for your career and ensuring it fits with the rest of your life. They discuss real life examples. Find out more about innovations in HR and Lincoln Financial at www.lfg.com. Lisa Buckingham is Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer at Lincoln Financial Group with more than 30 years of experience in all aspects of human resources management. In addition to all HR practices and policies for Lincoln Financial Group Lisa is also responsible for overseeing the corporation’s brand and enterprise communications, consumer insights and corporate social responsibility activities. In October 2017, she was named HR Executive of the Year by HR Executive Magazine. She serves on a number of boards including the Eagles Charitable Foundation and she Chairs the Lincoln Foundation. Stew and Lisa talk about the changes and challenges facing today’s Human Resources leaders, the importance of active listening, counseling people out of the wrong job, and taking responsibility for your career and ensuring it fits with the rest of your life. They discuss real life examples. Find out more about innovations in HR and Lincoln Financial at www.lfg.com. Ep 58. Kim Malone Scott: Radical Candor Ep 58. Kim Malone Scott: Radical Candor Wed, 31 Jan 2018 13:32:33 GMT 50:03 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/392376891 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-58-kim-malone-scott-radical-candor Kim Malone Scott is author of Radical Candor: Be … full Kim Malone Scott is author of Radical Candor: Be a Kickass Boss without Losing Your Humanity. It’s a great book about how to both care for and challenge the people around you. She has held a diverse range of leadership positions that have informed her theories on what makes a kickass boss! She led AdSense, YouTube, and Doubleclick Online Sales and Operations at Google and then joined Apple to develop and teach a leadership seminar. Kim has been a CEO coach at Dropbox, Qualtrics, Twitter, and several other tech companies. Previously, Kim was the co-founder and CEO of Juice Software, a collaboration start-up, and led business development at Delta Three and Capital Thinking. Earlier in her career, she worked as a senior policy advisor at the FCC, managed a pediatric clinic in Kosovo, started a diamond cutting factory in Moscow, and was an analyst on the Soviet Companies Fund. She received her MBA from Harvard Business School and her BA from Princeton University. She is the author of three novels; she and her husband Andy Scott are parents of twins and live in the San Francisco Bay Area. Stew and Kim discuss how to give constructive feedback and avoid manipulative insincerity, ruinous empathy, and obnoxious aggression. They explain how to practice and its importance as well as the dangers of feedback debt. For more check out RadicalCandor.com. Kim Malone Scott is author of Radical Candor: Be a Kickass Boss without Losing Your Humanity. It’s a great book about how to both care for and challenge the people around you. She has held a diverse range of leadership positions that have informed her theories on what makes a kickass boss! She led AdSense, YouTube, and Doubleclick Online Sales and Operations at Google and then joined Apple to develop and teach a leadership seminar. Kim has been a CEO coach at Dropbox, Qualtrics, Twitter, and several other tech companies. Previously, Kim was the co-founder and CEO of Juice Software, a collaboration start-up, and led business development at Delta Three and Capital Thinking. Earlier in her career, she worked as a senior policy advisor at the FCC, managed a pediatric clinic in Kosovo, started a diamond cutting factory in Moscow, and was an analyst on the Soviet Companies Fund. She received her MBA from Harvard Business School and her BA from Princeton University. She is the author of three novels; she and her husband Andy Scott are parents of twins and live in the San Francisco Bay Area. Stew and Kim discuss how to give constructive feedback and avoid manipulative insincerity, ruinous empathy, and obnoxious aggression. They explain how to practice and its importance as well as the dangers of feedback debt. For more check out RadicalCandor.com. Ep 57. Joanna Barsh: Grow Wherever You Work Ep 57. Joanna Barsh: Grow Wherever You Work Wed, 24 Jan 2018 13:41:46 GMT 50:36 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/388400546 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-57-joanna-barsh-grow-wherever-you-are full <![CDATA[Ep 56. Brett Hurt: Linking the World's Data for Good]]> Wed, 17 Jan 2018 12:06:19 GMT 48:14 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/384918815 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-56-brett-hurt-linking-the-worlds-data-for-good Brett Hurt graduated from the Wharton School in 1… full Brett Hurt graduated from the Wharton School in 1999 with an MBA in High-Tech Entrepreneurship. He is CEO and co-founder of data.world, his sixth startup, a Public Benefit Corporation and Certified B Corporation® focused on building the most meaningful, abundant, and collaborative data resource in the world. In 2017, data.world was honored on the “Best for the World” list by B Lab. Brett also founded and led Bazaarvoice and Coremetrics, which was acquired by IBM in 2010. He is also on the Board of Conscious Capitalism and in 2017 was given the Best CEO Legacy Award by the Austin Business Journal. Stew and Brett talk about conscious capitalism, how to stay true to your values, and what it takes to build a humane, compassionate workplace. Brett also discusses one of his “four-way-wins” -- helping his 13-year-old daughter promote her first book, Guardians of the Forest, proceeds from which support the Andy Roddick Foundation. For great information about and practical wisdom Brett, check out his blog at lucky7.io. And, from the vault, here is the transcript of the conversation Stew had with Brett when he was the first guest on Work and Life. Brett Hurt graduated from the Wharton School in 1999 with an MBA in High-Tech Entrepreneurship. He is CEO and co-founder of data.world, his sixth startup, a Public Benefit Corporation and Certified B Corporation® focused on building the most meaningful, abundant, and collaborative data resource in the world. In 2017, data.world was honored on the “Best for the World” list by B Lab. Brett also founded and led Bazaarvoice and Coremetrics, which was acquired by IBM in 2010. He is also on the Board of Conscious Capitalism and in 2017 was given the Best CEO Legacy Award by the Austin Business Journal. Stew and Brett talk about conscious capitalism, how to stay true to your values, and what it takes to build a humane, compassionate workplace. Brett also discusses one of his “four-way-wins” -- helping his 13-year-old daughter promote her first book, Guardians of the Forest, proceeds from which support the Andy Roddick Foundation. For great information about and practical wisdom Brett, check out his blog at lucky7.io. And, from the vault, here is the transcript of the conversation Stew had with Brett when he was the first guest on Work and Life. Ep 55. David Thomas: Overcoming Unconscious Bias Ep 55. David Thomas: Overcoming Unconscious Bias Wed, 10 Jan 2018 11:57:14 GMT 28:02 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/381481943 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-55-david-thomas-overcoming-unconscious-bias David Thomas President of Morehouse College full David Thomas was recently named as the new president of Morehouse College, a traditionally African American, all-male college in Atlanta. He was previously the H. Naylor Fitzhugh Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and Professor of Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, where he served as dean from 2011 to 2016. His research addresses issues related to executive development, cultural diversity in organizations, leadership, and organizational change. In recognition of his arrival at Morehouse, we’re publishing this conversation from our archives, done while David was Georgetown’s Dean. Stew and David talk about the impact of his early childhood, including his first experience with race consciousness as a five-year old. David believes there is still a problem with diversity and inclusion in corporate America, specifically in leadership roles. For instance; there are less than 10 CEOs in the Fortune 250 who are African American. Unconscious bias is a likely reason for the continuing lack of diversity in American business life, and how to address it is big part of David’s lifelong professional aspiration. Stew and David talk about his powerful, award-winning book, Breaking Through: The Making of Minority Executives in Corporate America, which has had a major impact on tackling this issue, one of the most crucial in our society today. David Thomas was recently named as the new president of Morehouse College, a traditionally African American, all-male college in Atlanta. He was previously the H. Naylor Fitzhugh Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and Professor of Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, where he served as dean from 2011 to 2016. His research addresses issues related to executive development, cultural diversity in organizations, leadership, and organizational change. In recognition of his arrival at Morehouse, we’re publishing this conversation from our archives, done while David was Georgetown’s Dean. Stew and David talk about the impact of his early childhood, including his first experience with race consciousness as a five-year old. David believes there is still a problem with diversity and inclusion in corporate America, specifically in leadership roles. For instance; there are less than 10 CEOs in the Fortune 250 who are African American. Unconscious bias is a likely reason for the continuing lack of diversity in American business life, and how to address it is big part of David’s lifelong professional aspiration. Stew and David talk about his powerful, award-winning book, Breaking Through: The Making of Minority Executives in Corporate America, which has had a major impact on tackling this issue, one of the most crucial in our society today. Ep 54. Jeff Pfeffer: Leadership B.S. Ep 54. Jeff Pfeffer: Leadership B.S. Wed, 03 Jan 2018 12:42:29 GMT 26:34 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/378164396 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-54-jeffrey-pfeffer-leadership-bs Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford University full Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business where he has taught since 1979. He is the author or co-author of 14 books on topics including power in organizations, managing people, evidence-based management and author of more than 150 articles and book chapters. Professor Pfeffer has won numerous awards for his scholarly research. He spoke with Stew about his latest book, Leadership B.S.: Fixing Workplaces and Careers One Truth at a Time, and what changes are needed in the “leadership industry.” In this episode, Stew and Jeff discuss the failures of modern leaders. Instead of showing virtues like honesty, authenticity, and modesty, many leaders show only narcissism and greed. These leaders are not promoting the greater good of their organizations, let alone our society. One of the great scholars of organizations, Jeff asks challenge questions, like why are executives held accountable for their environmental impact but not for their impact on employee well-being? One relevant example discussed here is Amazon’s company culture under CEO Jeff Bezos. Click here for the transcript. Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business where he has taught since 1979. He is the author or co-author of 14 books on topics including power in organizations, managing people, evidence-based management and author of more than 150 articles and book chapters. Professor Pfeffer has won numerous awards for his scholarly research. He spoke with Stew about his latest book, Leadership B.S.: Fixing Workplaces and Careers One Truth at a Time, and what changes are needed in the “leadership industry.” In this episode, Stew and Jeff discuss the failures of modern leaders. Instead of showing virtues like honesty, authenticity, and modesty, many leaders show only narcissism and greed. These leaders are not promoting the greater good of their organizations, let alone our society. One of the great scholars of organizations, Jeff asks challenge questions, like why are executives held accountable for their environmental impact but not for their impact on employee well-being? One relevant example discussed here is Amazon’s company culture under CEO Jeff Bezos. Click here for the transcript. Ep 53. Amy Wrzesniewski: Job Crafting Ep 53. Amy Wrzesniewski: Job Crafting Wed, 27 Dec 2017 14:45:10 GMT 29:24 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/375320645 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-53-amy-wryzesniewski-job-crafting Amy Wryzesniewski, Yale University full Amy Wryzesniewski is Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management. Her research on how people make meaning of their work has been published in a wide range of top academic journals and highlighted in several best-selling books and popular press outlets, including Forbes, Time, BusinessWeek, Harvard Business Review, U.S. News and World Report, and The Economist, as well as best-selling books such as Drive by Daniel Pink, The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman, and The Art of Happiness by the Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler. Amy earned her BA from the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated magna cum laude with an honors degree in psychology. She received her PhD in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan. Stew and Amy talk about the different ways people construe their work -- either as a job, a career, or a calling -- and why the latter is most beneficial. They discuss Amy’s fascinating research on how people in almost any work role are motivated to create meaning in their work by crafting it, transforming it, into a calling, in which there is at least some element of service to others. Amy describes some ideas for how anyone can do this and thereby enrich not only their work but other parts of their lives, too. Amy Wryzesniewski is Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management. Her research on how people make meaning of their work has been published in a wide range of top academic journals and highlighted in several best-selling books and popular press outlets, including Forbes, Time, BusinessWeek, Harvard Business Review, U.S. News and World Report, and The Economist, as well as best-selling books such as Drive by Daniel Pink, The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman, and The Art of Happiness by the Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler. Amy earned her BA from the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated magna cum laude with an honors degree in psychology. She received her PhD in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan. Stew and Amy talk about the different ways people construe their work -- either as a job, a career, or a calling -- and why the latter is most beneficial. They discuss Amy’s fascinating research on how people in almost any work role are motivated to create meaning in their work by crafting it, transforming it, into a calling, in which there is at least some element of service to others. Amy describes some ideas for how anyone can do this and thereby enrich not only their work but other parts of their lives, too. Ep 52. Bob Pozen: Extreme Productivity Ep 52. Bob Pozen: Extreme Productivity Wed, 20 Dec 2017 23:59:09 GMT 49:51 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/372360113 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-52-bob-pozen-extreme-productivity Bob Pozen is currently a Senior Lecturer at MIT’s… full Ep 51. Vikram Bakhru: Own Your Health Ep 51. Vikram Bakhru: Own Your Health Wed, 13 Dec 2017 13:17:37 GMT 49:03 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/368935460 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-51-vikram-bakhru-own-your-health Vikram Bakhru, M.D. is Chief Operating Officer at… full Vikram Bakhru, M.D. is Chief Operating Officer at ConsejoSano, a multicultural technology platform dedicated to improving health outcomes in underserved populations by improving their access and their engagement. This is Vik’s latest venture in the healthcare technology space. He’s a physician and serial entrepreneur with an MBA from Wharton (Class of 2009) in healthcare management. He serves on the Board of Directors for several organizations including the Nanubhai Education Foundation, Aspire Global Health and the Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children. Vik has been awarded the American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Leadership Award, The George Washington University Award, a Kaiser Family Foundation Grant, the Becker’s Hospital Review: Rising Stars in Healthcare Award, and was named to the Wharton Forty Under Forty for 2017. Stew and Vik talk about changing the frame in healthcare from physician-centered (with office visits, for instance, driven by doctors’ schedules) to patient-centered (with healthcare consultations controlled instead by patients’ schedule). They talk about the change from a reactive approach, when a medical problem is already far down the road, to a proactive one, which prevents illnesses before they get a toehold. They discuss the trend to make healthcare more accessible via telemedicine, digital records, home visits, transportation, and other innovations . Vik shares his passion for serving the underserved and for improving the health care system for all of us in the U. S. And he provides some practical advice by, for example, describing we every one of us can lead ourselves into better health via a weekly routine of attention to our evolving health needs. Vikram Bakhru, M.D. is Chief Operating Officer at ConsejoSano, a multicultural technology platform dedicated to improving health outcomes in underserved populations by improving their access and their engagement. This is Vik’s latest venture in the healthcare technology space. He’s a physician and serial entrepreneur with an MBA from Wharton (Class of 2009) in healthcare management. He serves on the Board of Directors for several organizations including the Nanubhai Education Foundation, Aspire Global Health and the Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children. Vik has been awarded the American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Leadership Award, The George Washington University Award, a Kaiser Family Foundation Grant, the Becker’s Hospital Review: Rising Stars in Healthcare Award, and was named to the Wharton Forty Under Forty for 2017. Stew and Vik talk about changing the frame in healthcare from physician-centered (with office visits, for instance, driven by doctors’ schedules) to patient-centered (with healthcare consultations controlled instead by patients’ schedule). They talk about the change from a reactive approach, when a medical problem is already far down the road, to a proactive one, which prevents illnesses before they get a toehold. They discuss the trend to make healthcare more accessible via telemedicine, digital records, home visits, transportation, and other innovations . Vik shares his passion for serving the underserved and for improving the health care system for all of us in the U. S. And he provides some practical advice by, for example, describing we every one of us can lead ourselves into better health via a weekly routine of attention to our evolving health needs. Ep 50. Tony Schwartz: Energy for Success Ep 50. Tony Schwartz: Energy for Success Wed, 06 Dec 2017 12:18:29 GMT 31:21 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/365739764 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-50-tony-schwartz-energy-for-success Tony Schwartz is the founder and CEO of the Energ… full Tony Schwartz is the founder and CEO of the Energy Project, which began in 2003. He is a thought leader on sustainable high performance and building more humane workplaces and he has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times. He began his career as a journalist and is author of several books, including The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time (with Jim Loehr) and The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working. He’s also co-author with Donald Trump, of The Art of the Deal. Tony has delivered keynotes and trainings to leaders of companies around the world and The Energy Project has offices in three countries. Stew and Tony talk about the importance of re-energizing and re-focusing in order to foster sustainable workplaces that allow employees to be productive. They discuss the role of feelings, one’s inner life, and one’s mood on performance and productivity. Tony talks about four reservoirs of energy -- physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual -- that need to be nurtured through ritual and practice to develop patterns that become habitual. They emphasize how the workplace can be a place of continual growth and development on an individual as well as an organizational level. Tony Schwartz is the founder and CEO of the Energy Project, which began in 2003. He is a thought leader on sustainable high performance and building more humane workplaces and he has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times. He began his career as a journalist and is author of several books, including The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time (with Jim Loehr) and The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working. He’s also co-author with Donald Trump, of The Art of the Deal. Tony has delivered keynotes and trainings to leaders of companies around the world and The Energy Project has offices in three countries. Stew and Tony talk about the importance of re-energizing and re-focusing in order to foster sustainable workplaces that allow employees to be productive. They discuss the role of feelings, one’s inner life, and one’s mood on performance and productivity. Tony talks about four reservoirs of energy -- physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual -- that need to be nurtured through ritual and practice to develop patterns that become habitual. They emphasize how the workplace can be a place of continual growth and development on an individual as well as an organizational level. Ep 49. Josh Levs: Paternity Leave Champion Ep 49. Josh Levs: Paternity Leave Champion Wed, 29 Nov 2017 15:41:25 GMT 25:12 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/362529530 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-49-josh-levs-paternity-leave-champion Josh Levs is an author, entrepreneur, and expert … full Josh Levs is an author, entrepreneur, and expert on fathers in the workplace. For 20 years, Josh wrote for NPR and CNN. He is a six-time Peabody award-winner and two-time Edward R. Murrow award-winner. At the time of the birth of his third child he sued his employer, CNN/Time Warner, to obtain a paternity leave for biological fathers that matched the company’s leaves for mothers and adoptive parents. This experience led him to write All in: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads, Families, and Businesses – And How We Can Fix It Together. In this episode, Stew and Josh discuss paternity leave and the outmoded policies and biases that prevent fathers from providing care. Josh recommends sweeping changes in both government and the private sector to support families by extending paternity leave. He describes the personal struggle he had supporting his third child and the progressive changes his employer, CNN/Time Warner, eventually made to support fathers. Other companies throughout America are making this leap. They support families by allowing fathers to be the caregivers. Read a transcript of the interview here. Josh Levs is an author, entrepreneur, and expert on fathers in the workplace. For 20 years, Josh wrote for NPR and CNN. He is a six-time Peabody award-winner and two-time Edward R. Murrow award-winner. At the time of the birth of his third child he sued his employer, CNN/Time Warner, to obtain a paternity leave for biological fathers that matched the company’s leaves for mothers and adoptive parents. This experience led him to write All in: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads, Families, and Businesses – And How We Can Fix It Together. In this episode, Stew and Josh discuss paternity leave and the outmoded policies and biases that prevent fathers from providing care. Josh recommends sweeping changes in both government and the private sector to support families by extending paternity leave. He describes the personal struggle he had supporting his third child and the progressive changes his employer, CNN/Time Warner, eventually made to support fathers. Other companies throughout America are making this leap. They support families by allowing fathers to be the caregivers. Read a transcript of the interview here. Ep 48. Sanyin Siang: Find Your Superpower and Launch Ep 48. Sanyin Siang: Find Your Superpower and Launch Wed, 22 Nov 2017 14:16:31 GMT 49:05 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/359397902 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-48-sanyin-siang-find-your-superpower-and-launch Sanyin Siang is an author, leadership advisor, an… full Ep 47. Michael Bungay Stanier: Say Less, Ask More Ep 47. Michael Bungay Stanier: Say Less, Ask More Wed, 15 Nov 2017 15:05:43 GMT 46:06 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/356163632 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-47-michael-bungay-stanier-say-less-ask-more Michael Bungay Stanier is founder of Box of Crayo… full Ep 46. Mike Brontager and Luke Zubrod: Maximizing Trust not Profit Ep 46. Mike Brontager and Luke Zubrod: Maximizing Trust not Profit Wed, 08 Nov 2017 12:20:03 GMT 50:34 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/352815374 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-46-mike-bontrager-luke-zubrod-maximizing-trust-not-profit Michael Bontrager founded Chatham Financial in 19… full Ep 45. Sarah Green Carmichael: Work Obsession Ep 45. Sarah Green Carmichael: Work Obsession Wed, 01 Nov 2017 13:34:46 GMT 41:15 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/349654168 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-45-sarah-green-carmichael-work-obsession Sarah Green Carmichael is a Senior Editor at Harv… full Sarah Green Carmichael is a Senior Editor at Harvard Business Review and host of the award-winning HBR IdeaCast, where she’s interviewed Stew a couple of times. So this episode turns the tables. Sarah edits HBR.org, which has won the Webby Award for Best Business Website the last two years in a row. She is a regular speaker and moderator at conferences like SXSW, the Drucker Forum, and Thinkers50. Prior to joining HBR, she was a sportswriter (her one major shortcoming is her unthinking devotion to the Boston Red Sox), taught middle school students, and worked as a researcher for Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Ellen Goodman. Her writing has been featured in many periodicals and magazines. She graduated magna cum laude from Brown University. Stew and Sarah talk about the growing problem of young people working too many hours, why this is an increasing risk in contemporary business life, and some practical ways to avoid the resulting burnout. Sarah labels it “work obsession” as opposed to “workaholism” or even “work martyrdom” to take the emphasis off hours worked and focus instead on the emotional investment we are placing on work, at the cost of our humanity. What, after all, is the purpose of a human life, she plainly asks? Work matters, but it may not need to be the primary feature of our brief moment on the planet. For many, after all, this is a matter of choice, right? Sarah Green Carmichael is a Senior Editor at Harvard Business Review and host of the award-winning HBR IdeaCast, where she’s interviewed Stew a couple of times. So this episode turns the tables. Sarah edits HBR.org, which has won the Webby Award for Best Business Website the last two years in a row. She is a regular speaker and moderator at conferences like SXSW, the Drucker Forum, and Thinkers50. Prior to joining HBR, she was a sportswriter (her one major shortcoming is her unthinking devotion to the Boston Red Sox), taught middle school students, and worked as a researcher for Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Ellen Goodman. Her writing has been featured in many periodicals and magazines. She graduated magna cum laude from Brown University. Stew and Sarah talk about the growing problem of young people working too many hours, why this is an increasing risk in contemporary business life, and some practical ways to avoid the resulting burnout. Sarah labels it “work obsession” as opposed to “workaholism” or even “work martyrdom” to take the emphasis off hours worked and focus instead on the emotional investment we are placing on work, at the cost of our humanity. What, after all, is the purpose of a human life, she plainly asks? Work matters, but it may not need to be the primary feature of our brief moment on the planet. For many, after all, this is a matter of choice, right? Ep 44. Roger Schwarz: Mutual Learning for Smarter Teams Ep 44. Roger Schwarz: Mutual Learning for Smarter Teams Wed, 25 Oct 2017 11:59:54 GMT 43:02 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/348513169 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-44-roger-schwarz-mutual-learning-for-smarter-teams Roger Schwarz is an organizational psychologist, … full Ep 43. Harry Kraemer: Values-Based Leadership Ep 43. Harry Kraemer: Values-Based Leadership Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:43:10 GMT 48:32 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/347462427 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-43-harry-kraemer-values-based-leadership Harry Kraemer is the former Chairman and CEO of B… full Harry Kraemer is the former Chairman and CEO of Baxter International Inc. -- a multi-billion-dollar global healthcare company -- and author of two books on values-based leadership: From Values to Action: The Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership and Becoming The Best: Build a World-Class Organization Through Values-Based Leadership. Harry is a clinical professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He is an executive partner with Madison Dearborn Partners, one of the largest private equity firms in the United States, where he consults with CEOs and other senior executives of companies in MDP’s extensive portfolio. Stew and Harry discuss the importance of knowing yourself and your values in order to motivate, inspire, and lead others. They discuss strategies for how to develop effective values-based leadership through self-reflection, listening, and being open to others’ perspectives. Leaders must challenge themselves to take an honest look at their personal values and determine how to incorporate those into their daily activities. By developing this self-awareness, leaders can instill a more meaningful sense of purpose in their work and in the rest of their lives. The second half includes some interesting questions from callers so be sure to listen for Harry’s responses. Harry Kraemer is the former Chairman and CEO of Baxter International Inc. -- a multi-billion-dollar global healthcare company -- and author of two books on values-based leadership: From Values to Action: The Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership and Becoming The Best: Build a World-Class Organization Through Values-Based Leadership. Harry is a clinical professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He is an executive partner with Madison Dearborn Partners, one of the largest private equity firms in the United States, where he consults with CEOs and other senior executives of companies in MDP’s extensive portfolio. Stew and Harry discuss the importance of knowing yourself and your values in order to motivate, inspire, and lead others. They discuss strategies for how to develop effective values-based leadership through self-reflection, listening, and being open to others’ perspectives. Leaders must challenge themselves to take an honest look at their personal values and determine how to incorporate those into their daily activities. By developing this self-awareness, leaders can instill a more meaningful sense of purpose in their work and in the rest of their lives. The second half includes some interesting questions from callers so be sure to listen for Harry’s responses. Ep 42. Nancy Drozdow and Debbie Bing: The Family Owned Business Ep 42. Nancy Drozdow and Debbie Bing: The Family Owned Business Wed, 11 Oct 2017 15:25:29 GMT 52:12 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/346412841 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-42-nancy-drozdow-debbie-bing-cfar-family-owned-business Nancy Drozdow and Debbie Bing are two principals … full Nancy Drozdow and Debbie Bing are two principals at CFAR; a private management consulting firm that focuses on both performance and relationships in family-owned businesses. CFAR was started as a research center at the Wharton School was established as an independent firm in 1987. Nancy Drozdow is a member of both the firm’s Board of Directors and Executive Committee. She is nationally known for her expertise as a thinking partner to leaders, successors, and successor candidates across the family enterprise. Debbie Bing began at the company as a Project Consultant in 1998, became an Associate in 1999, a Principal in 2006, and president in 2016. Her assumption of the Presidency represents the shift to CFAR’s second generation of leaders. Nancy and Debbie have been consulting with family-owned businesses for many years. Stew, Nancy, and Debbie talk about the special challenges and opportunities in family-owned business. s; they know how difficult it can be to integrate work and family when these two domains are one and the same. Fortunately, families who work together can overcome the challenge of having both a productive business and meaningful family life. Debbie and Nancy stress the importance of clearly defining expectations as a key to success. They spoke with Stew in the studio, offering great wisdom about what makes family-owned businesses so much fun. Nancy Drozdow and Debbie Bing are two principals at CFAR; a private management consulting firm that focuses on both performance and relationships in family-owned businesses. CFAR was started as a research center at the Wharton School was established as an independent firm in 1987. Nancy Drozdow is a member of both the firm’s Board of Directors and Executive Committee. She is nationally known for her expertise as a thinking partner to leaders, successors, and successor candidates across the family enterprise. Debbie Bing began at the company as a Project Consultant in 1998, became an Associate in 1999, a Principal in 2006, and president in 2016. Her assumption of the Presidency represents the shift to CFAR’s second generation of leaders. Nancy and Debbie have been consulting with family-owned businesses for many years. Stew, Nancy, and Debbie talk about the special challenges and opportunities in family-owned business. s; they know how difficult it can be to integrate work and family when these two domains are one and the same. Fortunately, families who work together can overcome the challenge of having both a productive business and meaningful family life. Debbie and Nancy stress the importance of clearly defining expectations as a key to success. They spoke with Stew in the studio, offering great wisdom about what makes family-owned businesses so much fun. Ep 41. David Allen: Getting Things Done Ep 41. David Allen: Getting Things Done Thu, 05 Oct 2017 00:58:10 GMT 41:37 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/345413982 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-41-david-allen-getting-things-done David Allen is the best-selling author of Getting… full David Allen is the best-selling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity and an expert in personal and organizational productivity. He teaches multiple courses on productivity based on GTD. His philosophy is based on the powerful realization that your mind is for having ideas, not holding them. There is a reason why GTD is a worldwide bestseller: David has broken down productivity to easy and actionable steps that anyone can take. In this episode, David shares his approach to work and life; it isn’t about creating separation. Rather, it is about creating appropriate engagement which is explained in detail during the conversation. Stew and David discuss the importance of getting things “out of your head” and onto some other place, one you trust. This is the first, and probably most important, of the five steps that David outlines to achieve productivity. Throughout the conversation, David shares simple yet powerful steps listeners to take to be more productive and fulfilled in all parts of life. David Allen is the best-selling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity and an expert in personal and organizational productivity. He teaches multiple courses on productivity based on GTD. His philosophy is based on the powerful realization that your mind is for having ideas, not holding them. There is a reason why GTD is a worldwide bestseller: David has broken down productivity to easy and actionable steps that anyone can take. In this episode, David shares his approach to work and life; it isn’t about creating separation. Rather, it is about creating appropriate engagement which is explained in detail during the conversation. Stew and David discuss the importance of getting things “out of your head” and onto some other place, one you trust. This is the first, and probably most important, of the five steps that David outlines to achieve productivity. Throughout the conversation, David shares simple yet powerful steps listeners to take to be more productive and fulfilled in all parts of life. Ep 40. Dorie Clark: Helping Leaders Stand Out Ep 40. Dorie Clark: Helping Leaders Stand Out Wed, 27 Sep 2017 12:56:18 GMT 30:53 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/344257632 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-40-dorie-clark-helping-leaders-stand-out Dorie Clark, who teaches at Duke University’s Fuq… full Dorie Clark, who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, is a renowned branding expert and a marketing strategy consultant. She uses her expertise in self-reinvention to spark personal change in the lives of her clients. She is author of Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It, which Inc. magazine named one of the top ten business books of 2015. Dorie speaks for clients including Google, Microsoft, Yale University, Fidelity, the U.S. State Department, and the World Bank. In this conversation, Stew and Dorie explore Dorie’s powerful framework for creating a distinct personal brand. Dorie helps people figure out how to distinguish themselves by becoming thought leaders in their organizations or professional communities. She walks Stew and listeners through the process of building a network, then an audience, and finally a community. Each step is essential for shaping your personal brand, one that enables you to have a positive impact in all parts of your life. Dorie Clark, who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, is a renowned branding expert and a marketing strategy consultant. She uses her expertise in self-reinvention to spark personal change in the lives of her clients. She is author of Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It, which Inc. magazine named one of the top ten business books of 2015. Dorie speaks for clients including Google, Microsoft, Yale University, Fidelity, the U.S. State Department, and the World Bank. In this conversation, Stew and Dorie explore Dorie’s powerful framework for creating a distinct personal brand. Dorie helps people figure out how to distinguish themselves by becoming thought leaders in their organizations or professional communities. She walks Stew and listeners through the process of building a network, then an audience, and finally a community. Each step is essential for shaping your personal brand, one that enables you to have a positive impact in all parts of your life. Ep 39. Frank Dobbin: Why Diversity Programs Fail Ep 39. Frank Dobbin: Why Diversity Programs Fail Wed, 20 Sep 2017 14:11:17 GMT 43:34 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/343229464 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-39-frank-dobbin-why-diversity-programs-fail Frank Dobbin, Harvard University full Frank Dobbin is a Professor of Sociology at Harvard, where he studies organizations, inequality, economic behavior and public policy. He is also Chair of Harvard’s Organizational Behavior PhD Program. His 2009 book, Inventing Equal Opportunity (which won the Max Weber and Distinguished Scholarly Book Awards from the American Sociological Association), charts how corporate human resources professionals defined discrimination under the Civil Rights Act. With Alexandra Kalev, he is developing an evidence-based approach to diversity management, studying both the effects of corporate diversity programs on actual workforce diversity, and the effects of workforce diversity on corporate performance. Frank’s research shows that most corporate diversity programs don’t work. Stew and Frank explore the ways mandatory diversity training, diversity hiring quotas, and other programs actually decrease demographic diversity in management. They fail because of a focus on controlling managers’ behavior, rather than engaging them in solving the problem, exposing people to others who are different, and encouraging social accountability for producing change. Frank offers suggestions about what is effective in promoting workforce diversity; like creating a diversity task force, mentoring, and cross-functional teams. This episode features a caller to the radio show with an inspiring story of what she has done to increase diversity in her workplace. Frank Dobbin is a Professor of Sociology at Harvard, where he studies organizations, inequality, economic behavior and public policy. He is also Chair of Harvard’s Organizational Behavior PhD Program. His 2009 book, Inventing Equal Opportunity (which won the Max Weber and Distinguished Scholarly Book Awards from the American Sociological Association), charts how corporate human resources professionals defined discrimination under the Civil Rights Act. With Alexandra Kalev, he is developing an evidence-based approach to diversity management, studying both the effects of corporate diversity programs on actual workforce diversity, and the effects of workforce diversity on corporate performance. Frank’s research shows that most corporate diversity programs don’t work. Stew and Frank explore the ways mandatory diversity training, diversity hiring quotas, and other programs actually decrease demographic diversity in management. They fail because of a focus on controlling managers’ behavior, rather than engaging them in solving the problem, exposing people to others who are different, and encouraging social accountability for producing change. Frank offers suggestions about what is effective in promoting workforce diversity; like creating a diversity task force, mentoring, and cross-functional teams. This episode features a caller to the radio show with an inspiring story of what she has done to increase diversity in her workplace. Ep 38. Gretchen Rubin: The Four Tendencies Ep 38. Gretchen Rubin: The Four Tendencies Wed, 13 Sep 2017 19:07:18 GMT 32:28 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/342218021 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-38-gretchen-rubin-the-four-tendencies Gretchen Rubin is a best-selling author of severa… full Gretchen Rubin is a best-selling author of several books on human nature. Her first bestsellers -- The Happiness Project and Happier at Home -- both sparked powerful conversations about the human search for happiness. Her bestseller Better Than Before explored how we can change our habits and create lasting change. Her latest is The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too). A member of Oprah’s SuperSoul 100, Gretchen has an enormous following, in print and online; on her popular daily blog, gretchenrubin.com, she reports on her adventures in pursuit of habits and happiness. She also has a highly ranked, award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin. Rubin started her career in law, and was clerking for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor when she realized she wanted to be a writer. Stew and Gretchen discuss how to use her very practical personality framework, how people respond to inner and outer expectations, and the importance of self-reflection in coming to know yourself. They explore the four types: Upholder (both Gretchen and Stew), Questioner, Obliger, and Rebel. They get into specific ways to change habits and interactions with others in your family, at work, and in other relationships so you can be your best self and help others to thrive as well. The goal is ever-deepening self-knowledge and acceptance of how others are different from you in the ways they see the world and respond to expectations. Gretchen Rubin is a best-selling author of several books on human nature. Her first bestsellers -- The Happiness Project and Happier at Home -- both sparked powerful conversations about the human search for happiness. Her bestseller Better Than Before explored how we can change our habits and create lasting change. Her latest is The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too). A member of Oprah’s SuperSoul 100, Gretchen has an enormous following, in print and online; on her popular daily blog, gretchenrubin.com, she reports on her adventures in pursuit of habits and happiness. She also has a highly ranked, award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin. Rubin started her career in law, and was clerking for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor when she realized she wanted to be a writer. Stew and Gretchen discuss how to use her very practical personality framework, how people respond to inner and outer expectations, and the importance of self-reflection in coming to know yourself. They explore the four types: Upholder (both Gretchen and Stew), Questioner, Obliger, and Rebel. They get into specific ways to change habits and interactions with others in your family, at work, and in other relationships so you can be your best self and help others to thrive as well. The goal is ever-deepening self-knowledge and acceptance of how others are different from you in the ways they see the world and respond to expectations. Ep 37. Bob Sutton: the Asshole Survival Guide Ep 37. Bob Sutton: the Asshole Survival Guide Wed, 06 Sep 2017 11:17:50 GMT 49:45 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/341146996 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-37-bob-sutton-the-asshole-survival-guide Bob Sutton is Professor of Management Science, En… full Bob Sutton is Professor of Management Science, Engineering, and Organizational Behavior at Stanford, where he co-founded the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). He received his Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from The University of Michigan (just a bit ahead of Stew). Bob studies organizational change, leadership, innovation, and workplace dynamics. He’s authored several bestselling books including The No Asshole Rule, which has been translated into more than 20 languages. His new book is The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt. In this conversation, Stew and Bob talk about surviving assholes at work and in other parts of life. Assholes hurt job performance, family life, and civil society. TCA (total cost of assholes) is a big problem! Bob provides proven, evidence-based strategies and tactics you can use to overcome people who treat you like dirt. But it starts with ourselves: But helps us see how we might be part of the problem and what we can do to overcome the bias that leads us to think others are assholes and we’re not. In the second half of the episode, Bob provides helpful advice to listeners struggling with assholes in their lives. Bob Sutton is Professor of Management Science, Engineering, and Organizational Behavior at Stanford, where he co-founded the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). He received his Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from The University of Michigan (just a bit ahead of Stew). Bob studies organizational change, leadership, innovation, and workplace dynamics. He’s authored several bestselling books including The No Asshole Rule, which has been translated into more than 20 languages. His new book is The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt. In this conversation, Stew and Bob talk about surviving assholes at work and in other parts of life. Assholes hurt job performance, family life, and civil society. TCA (total cost of assholes) is a big problem! Bob provides proven, evidence-based strategies and tactics you can use to overcome people who treat you like dirt. But it starts with ourselves: But helps us see how we might be part of the problem and what we can do to overcome the bias that leads us to think others are assholes and we’re not. In the second half of the episode, Bob provides helpful advice to listeners struggling with assholes in their lives. Ep 36. Julie Lythcott-Haims: How to Raise an Adult Ep 36. Julie Lythcott-Haims: How to Raise an Adult Wed, 30 Aug 2017 13:32:17 GMT 24:00 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/340139877 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-36-julie-lythcott-haims-how-to-raise-an-adult Julie Lythcott-Haims served as Stanford Universit… full Julie Lythcott-Haims served as Stanford University’s Dean of Freshmen for a decade. She received the Dinkelspiel Award for her contributions to the undergraduate experience. She’s a mother of two teenagers and has spoken and written widely on the phenomenon of helicopter parenting. She is also the author of the book How To Raise An Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success. In this episode, Stew and Julie discuss helicoptering parents and the harm they are doing to their children and society. Julie asserts that over-parenting deprives children of essential life skills needed to survive in the adult worlds of work, family, and community. She illustrates the effects of over-parenting on the emotional and intellectual development of the next generation of adults in our society. Julie then gives practical advice for parents, like making the shift away from the pronoun “we” when talking about their kids and learning to stop arguing with teachers or coaches on behalf of their children. This conversation is timely, in light of runaway college tuitions, competitive preschool admittance, and the deterioration of the Y Generation’s mental health. Click here for the transcript. Julie Lythcott-Haims served as Stanford University’s Dean of Freshmen for a decade. She received the Dinkelspiel Award for her contributions to the undergraduate experience. She’s a mother of two teenagers and has spoken and written widely on the phenomenon of helicopter parenting. She is also the author of the book How To Raise An Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success. In this episode, Stew and Julie discuss helicoptering parents and the harm they are doing to their children and society. Julie asserts that over-parenting deprives children of essential life skills needed to survive in the adult worlds of work, family, and community. She illustrates the effects of over-parenting on the emotional and intellectual development of the next generation of adults in our society. Julie then gives practical advice for parents, like making the shift away from the pronoun “we” when talking about their kids and learning to stop arguing with teachers or coaches on behalf of their children. This conversation is timely, in light of runaway college tuitions, competitive preschool admittance, and the deterioration of the Y Generation’s mental health. Click here for the transcript. Ep 35. David Flink: Empowering Those Who Learn Differently Ep 35. David Flink: Empowering Those Who Learn Differently Wed, 23 Aug 2017 11:28:26 GMT 33:54 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/339130879 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-35-david-flink-empowering-those-who-learn-differently David Flink is Founder and Chief Empowerment Offi… full David Flink is Founder and Chief Empowerment Officer at Eye to Eye, a non-profit that empowers young people with learning disabilities by giving them a mentor who shares that experience. He struggled with dyslexia and ADHD all the way through his pre-college education, lacking the support of an educator who could directly relate to him. In addition to his work at Eye to Eye, David sits on the boards of several national nonprofit and speaks regularly on campuses and at conferences. He is the author of Thinking Differently: An Inspiring Guide for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities. In this conversation, David tells the story of how he developed not just acceptance but pride in his identity as someone who learns and processes information differently. He strives to instill this pride in all of those now reached by Eye to Eye, which includes students in every state in the union. It’s a real social movement, with ever-increasing impact on helping all of us understand and embrace neurodiversity. David recalls the founding of Eye to Eye almost 20 years ago, during his undergraduate days at Brown University with his roommate, who he was shocked to find out, long after they had known each other, also had dyslexia. Mutually inspired to help each other and those with similarly different brains, they walked into a local school in Providence, RI and asked to teach the learning disabled students. Listen to this inspiring story and hear David’s sage advice for what parents and others can do to support people who learn differently. Bonus content: Stew talks to a listener who called in to the radio show to share his story as someone who learns differently. David Flink is Founder and Chief Empowerment Officer at Eye to Eye, a non-profit that empowers young people with learning disabilities by giving them a mentor who shares that experience. He struggled with dyslexia and ADHD all the way through his pre-college education, lacking the support of an educator who could directly relate to him. In addition to his work at Eye to Eye, David sits on the boards of several national nonprofit and speaks regularly on campuses and at conferences. He is the author of Thinking Differently: An Inspiring Guide for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities. In this conversation, David tells the story of how he developed not just acceptance but pride in his identity as someone who learns and processes information differently. He strives to instill this pride in all of those now reached by Eye to Eye, which includes students in every state in the union. It’s a real social movement, with ever-increasing impact on helping all of us understand and embrace neurodiversity. David recalls the founding of Eye to Eye almost 20 years ago, during his undergraduate days at Brown University with his roommate, who he was shocked to find out, long after they had known each other, also had dyslexia. Mutually inspired to help each other and those with similarly different brains, they walked into a local school in Providence, RI and asked to teach the learning disabled students. Listen to this inspiring story and hear David’s sage advice for what parents and others can do to support people who learn differently. Bonus content: Stew talks to a listener who called in to the radio show to share his story as someone who learns differently. Ep. 34: Mick Batyske: DJ to the Stars, Dad to Myles Ep. 34: Mick Batyske: DJ to the Stars, Dad to Myles Wed, 16 Aug 2017 11:01:27 GMT 30:15 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/338107920 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-34-mick-batyske-dj-to-the-stars-dad-to-myles Mick Batyske is a multi-talented creative profess… full Mick Batyske is a multi-talented creative professional from Brooklyn by way of Youngstown, Ohio. He is one of the most in-demand DJs in the world, style influencer, tech investor, music curator, and brand consultant. And he’s a new dad. His work takes Mick all over the world, collaborating with artists including Beyonce and Adele. As a digital and social entrepreneur, he invests in and consults with an array of startups. He is a co-owner of Dot Dot Dash, a new media studio inventing cutting edge interactive environments, and Anchor, a new kind of radio where anyone can join the conversation. Stew and Mick talk about Mick’s first re-branding; transforming himself from a marching band nerd in high school to a turntable spinning DJ in college. After earning an MBA from John Carroll University, Mick moved to Brooklyn to start DJing full time. He has had enormous success, spinning at private parties for celebrities like Kayne West and Jay-Z. Central to his life and his success is Mick’s powerful commitment to his wife and young son. How does being a father affect this super-successful creative talent’s whirlwind experience in the wild world of popular culture? Listen and learn from how Mick Batyske is leading the life he wants and how he weaves together the different roles he plays in his own distinctive way. Mick Batyske is a multi-talented creative professional from Brooklyn by way of Youngstown, Ohio. He is one of the most in-demand DJs in the world, style influencer, tech investor, music curator, and brand consultant. And he’s a new dad. His work takes Mick all over the world, collaborating with artists including Beyonce and Adele. As a digital and social entrepreneur, he invests in and consults with an array of startups. He is a co-owner of Dot Dot Dash, a new media studio inventing cutting edge interactive environments, and Anchor, a new kind of radio where anyone can join the conversation. Stew and Mick talk about Mick’s first re-branding; transforming himself from a marching band nerd in high school to a turntable spinning DJ in college. After earning an MBA from John Carroll University, Mick moved to Brooklyn to start DJing full time. He has had enormous success, spinning at private parties for celebrities like Kayne West and Jay-Z. Central to his life and his success is Mick’s powerful commitment to his wife and young son. How does being a father affect this super-successful creative talent’s whirlwind experience in the wild world of popular culture? Listen and learn from how Mick Batyske is leading the life he wants and how he weaves together the different roles he plays in his own distinctive way. Ep 33. Nilofer Merchant: Take a Stand Where No One Else Can Ep 33. Nilofer Merchant: Take a Stand Where No One Else Can Wed, 09 Aug 2017 21:19:38 GMT 37:32 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/337199894 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-33-nilofer-merchant-take-a-stand-where-no-one-else-can Nilofer Merchant is a master at turning seemingl… full Nilofer Merchant is a master at turning seemingly “wild” ideas into new realities and showing the rest of us how we can too. She has personally launched more than 100 products, netting $18B in sales, for companies ranging from Apple to Autodesk. Nilofer was awarded the Future Thinker Award from Thinkers50, which ranks the world’s leading business thinkers and which also named her the #1 person most likely to influence the future of management in both theory and practice. She is the author of The Power of Onlyness: Make Your Wild Ideas Mighty Enough to Dent the World. We live in a time when new ideas can reach multitudes because of the advent of the digital age. How can you harness this power? Stew and Nilofer discuss her personal “onlyness” story and what her research of hundreds of innovators shows about how to unlock each person’s potential to spread the word about their distinctive ideas for making the world better. She tells compelling stories of real people who have, against the odds, made positive change. Nilofer’s strategy can be used by anyone to reduce the inhibiting forces of bias and to maximize the chances of their innovative thinking becoming a new reality. Bonus: Listen to the end to learn from the story of one of the listeners who called in to the show. Extra bonus: Here is the transcript of a conversation Stew and Nilofer had a while back, as “Onlyness” was germinating. Nilofer Merchant is a master at turning seemingly “wild” ideas into new realities and showing the rest of us how we can too. She has personally launched more than 100 products, netting $18B in sales, for companies ranging from Apple to Autodesk. Nilofer was awarded the Future Thinker Award from Thinkers50, which ranks the world’s leading business thinkers and which also named her the #1 person most likely to influence the future of management in both theory and practice. She is the author of The Power of Onlyness: Make Your Wild Ideas Mighty Enough to Dent the World. We live in a time when new ideas can reach multitudes because of the advent of the digital age. How can you harness this power? Stew and Nilofer discuss her personal “onlyness” story and what her research of hundreds of innovators shows about how to unlock each person’s potential to spread the word about their distinctive ideas for making the world better. She tells compelling stories of real people who have, against the odds, made positive change. Nilofer’s strategy can be used by anyone to reduce the inhibiting forces of bias and to maximize the chances of their innovative thinking becoming a new reality. Bonus: Listen to the end to learn from the story of one of the listeners who called in to the show. Extra bonus: Here is the transcript of a conversation Stew and Nilofer had a while back, as “Onlyness” was germinating. Ep 32. Sydney Finkelstein: Be a Superboss Ep 32. Sydney Finkelstein: Be a Superboss Wed, 02 Aug 2017 11:59:00 GMT 29:17 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/335930097 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-32-sydney-finkelstein-be-a-superboss Sydney Finkelstein, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth full Sydney Finkelstein is the the Steven Roth Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Executive Education at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. He is author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent. Sydney is a recognized thought leader on strategy, leadership, and corporate governance, having published several bestsellers including #1 bestseller in the U.S. and Japan, Why Smart Executives Fail. Sydney defines superbosses as those who have an outsized impact on their professional field by training and developing future leaders. In this episode, Stew and Sydney discuss what separates bad bosses, good bosses, and superbosses. Sydney believes all managers can better help their employees’ careers by learning from superbosses. Near the end of the conversation, Stew and Sydney talk to a Work and Life radio show listener who called to get some coaching on how to deal with a micromanaging (definitely not super) boss. Sydney Finkelstein is the the Steven Roth Professor of Management and Associate Dean for Executive Education at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. He is author of Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Master the Flow of Talent. Sydney is a recognized thought leader on strategy, leadership, and corporate governance, having published several bestsellers including #1 bestseller in the U.S. and Japan, Why Smart Executives Fail. Sydney defines superbosses as those who have an outsized impact on their professional field by training and developing future leaders. In this episode, Stew and Sydney discuss what separates bad bosses, good bosses, and superbosses. Sydney believes all managers can better help their employees’ careers by learning from superbosses. Near the end of the conversation, Stew and Sydney talk to a Work and Life radio show listener who called to get some coaching on how to deal with a micromanaging (definitely not super) boss. Ep 31. Stephanie Abbuhl: Game Changer For Women In Medicine Ep 31. Stephanie Abbuhl: Game Changer For Women In Medicine Wed, 26 Jul 2017 13:34:06 GMT 42:56 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/334919739 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-31-stephanie-abbuhl-game-changer-for-women-in-medicine Stephanie Abbuhl MD is Professor and Vice Chair o… full Ep 30. Eric Barker: Debunking Myths about Work and Life Ep 30. Eric Barker: Debunking Myths about Work and Life Wed, 19 Jul 2017 13:08:25 GMT 32:57 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/333863147 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-30-eric-barker-debunking-myths-about-work-and-life Eric Barker, author Barking Up The Wrong Tree full Eric Barker is a University of Pennsylvania graduate and author of the popular blog Barking Up the Wrong Tree. Eric gives evidence-based answers and expert insight to questions about how to be awesome at life and he does so in a funny and practical manner. Over 300,000 people subscribe to his weekly newsletter. He is also author of the Wall Street Journal bestseller, Barking Up the Wrong Tree: Why Everything You Know About Success is (Mostly) Wrong. He’s been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic Monthly, and the Financial Times. In his engaging conversation with Stew, Eric discusses how people find meaningful environments in which to pursue their work. He asserts that most unhappiness in our work lives stems from a lack of personal assessment and reflection. By knowing ourselves and thinking critically, we can find success. Eric instructs listeners to intentionally seek new environments, try out new jobs, and increase interactions with new people. His advice on remaining open to new settings is well taken in an field currently dominated by the psychology of grit. Eric Barker is a University of Pennsylvania graduate and author of the popular blog Barking Up the Wrong Tree. Eric gives evidence-based answers and expert insight to questions about how to be awesome at life and he does so in a funny and practical manner. Over 300,000 people subscribe to his weekly newsletter. He is also author of the Wall Street Journal bestseller, Barking Up the Wrong Tree: Why Everything You Know About Success is (Mostly) Wrong. He’s been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic Monthly, and the Financial Times. In his engaging conversation with Stew, Eric discusses how people find meaningful environments in which to pursue their work. He asserts that most unhappiness in our work lives stems from a lack of personal assessment and reflection. By knowing ourselves and thinking critically, we can find success. Eric instructs listeners to intentionally seek new environments, try out new jobs, and increase interactions with new people. His advice on remaining open to new settings is well taken in an field currently dominated by the psychology of grit. Ep 29. Bill Taylor: Simply Brilliant, Brilliantly Simple Ep 29. Bill Taylor: Simply Brilliant, Brilliantly Simple Wed, 12 Jul 2017 13:49:06 GMT 31:05 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/332865112 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-29-bill-taylor-simply-brilliant-brilliantly-simple Bill Taylor founding editor, FastCompany full Bill Taylor is co-founder and founding editor of Fast Company, which has won just about every award there is to win in the magazine world since its creation in 1995. Bill has also written three important books on leadership and change. His new book is Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways. His previous book, Mavericks at Work, was a New York Times bestseller and was named a “Business Book of the Year” by The Economist and the Financial Times. Stew and Bill dive into Bill’s book Simply Brilliant, which analyzes innovative companies in traditionally slow-moving industries like government or manufacturing. Two such companies discussed by Stew and Bill are Lincoln Electric and Pal’s Sudden Service. They talk about the smart management practices in both companies that foster such great innovation and performance. Trust in the employees is key. Special bonus: As a fellow Springsteen fanatic, Bill gives his take on how The Boss personifies the essential traits of successful managers. Bill Taylor is co-founder and founding editor of Fast Company, which has won just about every award there is to win in the magazine world since its creation in 1995. Bill has also written three important books on leadership and change. His new book is Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways. His previous book, Mavericks at Work, was a New York Times bestseller and was named a “Business Book of the Year” by The Economist and the Financial Times. Stew and Bill dive into Bill’s book Simply Brilliant, which analyzes innovative companies in traditionally slow-moving industries like government or manufacturing. Two such companies discussed by Stew and Bill are Lincoln Electric and Pal’s Sudden Service. They talk about the smart management practices in both companies that foster such great innovation and performance. Trust in the employees is key. Special bonus: As a fellow Springsteen fanatic, Bill gives his take on how The Boss personifies the essential traits of successful managers. Ep 28. Jonelle Lesniak: Embrace Failure to Curb Unhealthy Competition Ep 28. Jonelle Lesniak: Embrace Failure to Curb Unhealthy Competition Wed, 05 Jul 2017 16:04:32 GMT 35:29 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/331706124 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-28-jonelle-lesniak-embrace-failure Jonelle Lesniak is a senior analyst at the manage… full Jonelle Lesniak is a senior analyst at the management consulting firm THRUUE, seeking to create change in organizations culture. She also coaches young professionals by helping them to consider important questions that lead to self-knowledge they can put into action. Jonelle is a graduate of the Wharton School, after which she became a fellow at the Trinity Fellows Academy, where she conducted research on elite college culture. This formative experience ultimately led her to pursue a career in coaching and company culture. In this conversation, Jonelle and Stew discuss overly competitive college cultures and Jonelle’s consulting work at THRUUE. Jonelle feels students and professionals must dig deep to find their own definition of success instead of relying on cultural norms. She talks about her own experience in the the highly competitive social milieu of Wharton. Fascinating solutions addressing this problem by normalizing imperfection include the failure certificate, a new program at Smith College, and Jonelle’s own resume of failures. Helping people see failure as a part of success promises to improve the emotional health of high-achievers at any life stage. Jonelle Lesniak is a senior analyst at the management consulting firm THRUUE, seeking to create change in organizations culture. She also coaches young professionals by helping them to consider important questions that lead to self-knowledge they can put into action. Jonelle is a graduate of the Wharton School, after which she became a fellow at the Trinity Fellows Academy, where she conducted research on elite college culture. This formative experience ultimately led her to pursue a career in coaching and company culture. In this conversation, Jonelle and Stew discuss overly competitive college cultures and Jonelle’s consulting work at THRUUE. Jonelle feels students and professionals must dig deep to find their own definition of success instead of relying on cultural norms. She talks about her own experience in the the highly competitive social milieu of Wharton. Fascinating solutions addressing this problem by normalizing imperfection include the failure certificate, a new program at Smith College, and Jonelle’s own resume of failures. Helping people see failure as a part of success promises to improve the emotional health of high-achievers at any life stage. Ep 27: Jason Fried: Signal vs. Noise -- Less Work, More Production Ep 27: Jason Fried: Signal vs. Noise -- Less Work, More Production Wed, 28 Jun 2017 21:43:30 GMT 31:23 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/330598445 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-27-jason-fried-signal-vs-noise-less-work-more-production Jason Fried is Co-Founder and CEO of Basecamp, a … full Jason Fried is Co-Founder and CEO of Basecamp, a leading project management tool that has helped over 2.5 million users improve their organizational skills. Basecamp was founded in 1999 and today it has over 2.5 million users (including, full disclosure, the Work and Life podcast team). Jason writes a monthly column for Inc. Magazine, called “Get Real,” where he discusses his points of view on business and gives advice to aspiring entrepreneurs. The Basecamp company is known for designing beautiful web applications, offering a monthly stipend for massages, encouraging employees to work no more than 40 hours per week, and paying for vacations -- not just the time off, but the actual vacations. Stew and Jason discuss the importance of being mindful and strategic about choosing how to invest your attention as a leader. They discuss the importance of uninterrupted time at work and the general unhelpfulness of meetings. Jason talks about how he and his team have positioned themselves in the “problem avoidance” business, in part by constraining their growth as a company over the year and in contrast to the generally accepted practice of pursuing growth no matter what the cost. Jason offers a vision of clarity in a marketplace cluttered with the counterproductive noise businesses too often generate themselves. Jason Fried is Co-Founder and CEO of Basecamp, a leading project management tool that has helped over 2.5 million users improve their organizational skills. Basecamp was founded in 1999 and today it has over 2.5 million users (including, full disclosure, the Work and Life podcast team). Jason writes a monthly column for Inc. Magazine, called “Get Real,” where he discusses his points of view on business and gives advice to aspiring entrepreneurs. The Basecamp company is known for designing beautiful web applications, offering a monthly stipend for massages, encouraging employees to work no more than 40 hours per week, and paying for vacations -- not just the time off, but the actual vacations. Stew and Jason discuss the importance of being mindful and strategic about choosing how to invest your attention as a leader. They discuss the importance of uninterrupted time at work and the general unhelpfulness of meetings. Jason talks about how he and his team have positioned themselves in the “problem avoidance” business, in part by constraining their growth as a company over the year and in contrast to the generally accepted practice of pursuing growth no matter what the cost. Jason offers a vision of clarity in a marketplace cluttered with the counterproductive noise businesses too often generate themselves. <![CDATA[Ep 26. Sim Sitkin: Duke's Coach K Professor on Building Trust]]> Wed, 21 Jun 2017 12:08:58 GMT 46:52 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/329289537 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-26-sim-sitkin-building-trust Sim Sitkin is the Michael W. Krzyzewski Universit… full Sim Sitkin is the Michael W. Krzyzewski University Professor of Leadership, Founding Faculty Director of the Fuqua/Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics at the Fuqua School of Business, and Director of the Behavioral Science and Policy Center at Duke University. His research focuses on leadership and the influence of risk taking. His publications are featured in the most prestigious academic journals and intertwine his work on leadership with topics such as accountability, acquisition processes, and innovation. In today’s episode, Stew and Sim talk about trust, leadership, building our capacity to create positive change in the world, and Sim’s mega-HBR article The Stretch Goal Paradox. Stew and Sim explore how to remain open to new information by learning to appreciate different perspectives. Sim’s decades of research offers critical insight in a world fractured by social media bubbles, political partisanship, and distrust for institutions. He makes a very useful distinction between distrust and low trust. Many organizations fail to gain the public’s trust because they mistake one for the other; and all of us, in our professional and private lives, can easily fall prey to the same error. In the second half of the episode, Stew and Sim talk with callers who share their personal stories and Sim provides very helpful guidance with his expertise on leadership and Sim Sitkin is the Michael W. Krzyzewski University Professor of Leadership, Founding Faculty Director of the Fuqua/Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics at the Fuqua School of Business, and Director of the Behavioral Science and Policy Center at Duke University. His research focuses on leadership and the influence of risk taking. His publications are featured in the most prestigious academic journals and intertwine his work on leadership with topics such as accountability, acquisition processes, and innovation. In today’s episode, Stew and Sim talk about trust, leadership, building our capacity to create positive change in the world, and Sim’s mega-HBR article The Stretch Goal Paradox. Stew and Sim explore how to remain open to new information by learning to appreciate different perspectives. Sim’s decades of research offers critical insight in a world fractured by social media bubbles, political partisanship, and distrust for institutions. He makes a very useful distinction between distrust and low trust. Many organizations fail to gain the public’s trust because they mistake one for the other; and all of us, in our professional and private lives, can easily fall prey to the same error. In the second half of the episode, Stew and Sim talk with callers who share their personal stories and Sim provides very helpful guidance with his expertise on leadership and Ep 25. Monica Worline: Awakening Compassion at Work Ep 25. Monica Worline: Awakening Compassion at Work Wed, 14 Jun 2017 23:12:21 GMT 48:04 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/328090451 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-25-monica-worline-awakening-compassion-at-work Monica Worline is the founder and CEO of EnlivenW… full Monica Worline is the founder and CEO of EnlivenWork, an organization that teaches businesses how to use compassionate leadership to enliven, or humanize and energize, the work they do. She is also a research scientist at Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, Executive Director of CompassionLab -- the world’s leading research collaboratory focused on compassion in the workplace -- a lecturer at the Ross School of Business, and co-author of Awakening Compassion at Work: The Quiet Power that Elevates People and Organizations. Monica spoke with Stew about the impact compassion can have on improving both employees’ lives and business performance. Monica describes four steps for awakening compassion in the workplace, or in any situation. Any employee at any level who follows these steps can have a powerful effect on their organization’s culture. Stew and Monica talk about how leaders set the tone in most organizations for compassion; even the smallest adjustments can go a long way. In the second half of the conversation, two wonderful callers joined the conversation with poignant and instructive examples of the value of awakening compassion. Monica Worline is the founder and CEO of EnlivenWork, an organization that teaches businesses how to use compassionate leadership to enliven, or humanize and energize, the work they do. She is also a research scientist at Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, Executive Director of CompassionLab -- the world’s leading research collaboratory focused on compassion in the workplace -- a lecturer at the Ross School of Business, and co-author of Awakening Compassion at Work: The Quiet Power that Elevates People and Organizations. Monica spoke with Stew about the impact compassion can have on improving both employees’ lives and business performance. Monica describes four steps for awakening compassion in the workplace, or in any situation. Any employee at any level who follows these steps can have a powerful effect on their organization’s culture. Stew and Monica talk about how leaders set the tone in most organizations for compassion; even the smallest adjustments can go a long way. In the second half of the conversation, two wonderful callers joined the conversation with poignant and instructive examples of the value of awakening compassion. <![CDATA[Ep 24. Joan Williams: What Elites Don't Get About the White Working Class]]> Wed, 07 Jun 2017 18:21:50 GMT 35:36 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/327006614 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-24-joan-williams-what-elites-dont-get-about-white-working Joan Williams is a Distinguished Law Professor at… full Joan Williams is a Distinguished Law Professor at the University of California Hastings and Founding Director of the Center for WorkLife Law, which promotes gender and racial equality in the workplace. She’s written extensively on gender and work, including What Works For Women At Work, Reshaping The Work-Family Debate and Unbending Gender: Why Family And Work Conflict and What To Do About It. She and others at Hastings have a new initiative to help reduce bias against women and minorities at work, called Bias Interrupters. In this episode Stew and Joan discuss Joan’s new book, White Working Class: Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America. It is based on a blockbuster article in the Harvard Business Review published days after the presidential election titled What So Many People Don’t’ Get About the U.S. Working Class. They focus on the matter of dignity, an essential aspect of one’s identity that affects all aspects of one’s life. Joan believes the American elite neither understands nor appreciates the working class’s struggle for a prosperous middle class life; a dream that is getting harder and harder to realize. Trump understands the need for good paying jobs for the working class and Joan believes that is why he is now POTUS instead of Hillary. Stew and Joan explore ways the elite and working class can achieve harmony instead of conflict and policy solutions that can help the working class economically. In the second half of the podcast, Stew takes calls from listeners of the radio show who share their perspective about working class dignity. Joan Williams is a Distinguished Law Professor at the University of California Hastings and Founding Director of the Center for WorkLife Law, which promotes gender and racial equality in the workplace. She’s written extensively on gender and work, including What Works For Women At Work, Reshaping The Work-Family Debate and Unbending Gender: Why Family And Work Conflict and What To Do About It. She and others at Hastings have a new initiative to help reduce bias against women and minorities at work, called Bias Interrupters. In this episode Stew and Joan discuss Joan’s new book, White Working Class: Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America. It is based on a blockbuster article in the Harvard Business Review published days after the presidential election titled What So Many People Don’t’ Get About the U.S. Working Class. They focus on the matter of dignity, an essential aspect of one’s identity that affects all aspects of one’s life. Joan believes the American elite neither understands nor appreciates the working class’s struggle for a prosperous middle class life; a dream that is getting harder and harder to realize. Trump understands the need for good paying jobs for the working class and Joan believes that is why he is now POTUS instead of Hillary. Stew and Joan explore ways the elite and working class can achieve harmony instead of conflict and policy solutions that can help the working class economically. In the second half of the podcast, Stew takes calls from listeners of the radio show who share their perspective about working class dignity. Ep 23. Erin Bagwell: Director of the Inspirational Film Dream, Girl Ep 23. Erin Bagwell: Director of the Inspirational Film Dream, Girl Wed, 31 May 2017 13:50:32 GMT 27:46 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/325357187 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-23-erin-bagwell-dream-girl Erin Bagwell is founder of Feminist Wednesday, a … full Erin Bagwell is founder of Feminist Wednesday, a storytelling blog. In the summer of 2014 she launched a successful Kickstarter campaign, raising over $100,000 to produce her first feature length film Dream, Girl. In May 2016, Dream, Girl screened at the White House as part of the United State of Women Summit. Erin was named one of Oprah’s SuperSoul100, a list featuring extraordinary individuals that live life intentionally, create great social impact, and bring inspiration to others. Dream, Girl was named the number one feminist documentary to watch by the Huffington Post. In this episode, Stew and Erin talk about her struggle and eventual triumph as the director of Dream, Girl. Erin had fears and doubts when she quit her “soul-sucking” 9-to-5 job and began producing Dream, Girl. She drew on the support of others (her “tribe”), including the women entrepreneurs in her film, to gain the courage and expertise needed to succeed. In the second half of the show, Erin describes the positive impact the film has had on students and on entrepreneurial communities where it sparks important, inspiring discussions. Check out the trailer of Dream, Girls. Erin Bagwell is founder of Feminist Wednesday, a storytelling blog. In the summer of 2014 she launched a successful Kickstarter campaign, raising over $100,000 to produce her first feature length film Dream, Girl. In May 2016, Dream, Girl screened at the White House as part of the United State of Women Summit. Erin was named one of Oprah’s SuperSoul100, a list featuring extraordinary individuals that live life intentionally, create great social impact, and bring inspiration to others. Dream, Girl was named the number one feminist documentary to watch by the Huffington Post. In this episode, Stew and Erin talk about her struggle and eventual triumph as the director of Dream, Girl. Erin had fears and doubts when she quit her “soul-sucking” 9-to-5 job and began producing Dream, Girl. She drew on the support of others (her “tribe”), including the women entrepreneurs in her film, to gain the courage and expertise needed to succeed. In the second half of the show, Erin describes the positive impact the film has had on students and on entrepreneurial communities where it sparks important, inspiring discussions. Check out the trailer of Dream, Girls. Ep 22. Marci Alboher: Encore Careers Ep 22. Marci Alboher: Encore Careers Wed, 24 May 2017 13:50:42 GMT 32:08 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/324265342 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-22-marci-alboher-encore-careers Marci Alboher is Vice President at Encore.org, a … full Marci Alboher is Vice President at Encore.org, a nonprofit making it easier for millions of older people to pursue second acts in their career. She is the author of The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life and also One Person/Multiple Careers: The Original Guide to the Slash “/” Career. She’s a former blogger and columnist for The New York Times and serves on the board of Girls Write Now, the advisory council of Echoing Green’s Work on Purpose program, and the advisory board of The OpEd Project. In this episode, Stew and Marci focus on the many ways Encore is enabling older people to have a large impact on their communities by applying their wisdom gained from years of professional experience. One such program, called Generation to Generation, has the ambitious goal of mobilizing a million adults over 50. Marci explains how the Encore Fellowship helps experienced professionals transition to mission-driven work in the nonprofit sector. Stew and Marci also talk about what holds older people back professionally and steps they can take to overcome these inhibitors to change. Bonus feature: Here’s a transcript of an earlier conversation with Marci, one of the very first radio shows on Wharton and SiriusXM’s Work and Life. Marci Alboher is Vice President at Encore.org, a nonprofit making it easier for millions of older people to pursue second acts in their career. She is the author of The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life and also One Person/Multiple Careers: The Original Guide to the Slash “/” Career. She’s a former blogger and columnist for The New York Times and serves on the board of Girls Write Now, the advisory council of Echoing Green’s Work on Purpose program, and the advisory board of The OpEd Project. In this episode, Stew and Marci focus on the many ways Encore is enabling older people to have a large impact on their communities by applying their wisdom gained from years of professional experience. One such program, called Generation to Generation, has the ambitious goal of mobilizing a million adults over 50. Marci explains how the Encore Fellowship helps experienced professionals transition to mission-driven work in the nonprofit sector. Stew and Marci also talk about what holds older people back professionally and steps they can take to overcome these inhibitors to change. Bonus feature: Here’s a transcript of an earlier conversation with Marci, one of the very first radio shows on Wharton and SiriusXM’s Work and Life. Ep 21. Matt Schneider: Pioneering Stay-at-Home Dad Ep 21. Matt Schneider: Pioneering Stay-at-Home Dad Wed, 17 May 2017 21:58:50 GMT 51:19 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/323127053 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-21-matt-schneider-pioneering-stay-at-home-dad Matt Schneider is a stay-at-home dad and Wharton … full Matt Schneider is a stay-at-home dad and Wharton alumnus who founded the City Dads Group, a diverse community of more than 8,000 fathers in 26 cities across the United States who are supporting each other and redefining what it means to be a dad in the 21st century. It’s the largest organized community of fathers in the United States. Matt works with reporters, commercial brands, and entertainment companies to encourage more accurate and positive portrayals of fathers and fatherhood in media and advertising. He also hosts the Modern Dads Podcast. In this episode, Matt shares his experience as a stay-at-home dad and tells the story of founding the City Dads Group. Even though male caregivers are becoming increasingly common and accepted throughout America, Matt found it difficult to find a male peer group to talk about parenting, and that’s what led to his creating the City Dads Group. Matt and Stew explore important topics related to successful male caregiving, including how to clarify expectations with your spouse about domestic responsibilities. In the second half of the conversation, listeners share their inspiring experiences as stay-at-home dads. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 3:43: Founding the City Dads Group. Matt founded the City Dads Group nine years ago with the help of Lance Somerfield. He is a stay-at-home father who has two kids. 30:24: Edgar’s story. A radio show listener describes what it’s been like for him as an African American stay-at-home dad. 37:57: Negotiating parental responsibilities. Stew and Matt discuss how couples have to continually talk about how they’re allocating parental responsibilities. Matt emphasizes the importance of agreeing on performance standards, such as the operational definition of a “clean” room. 42:31: Kelly’s story. Another listener shares compelling advice to fathers based on his experience as a stay-at-home dad. Matt Schneider is a stay-at-home dad and Wharton alumnus who founded the City Dads Group, a diverse community of more than 8,000 fathers in 26 cities across the United States who are supporting each other and redefining what it means to be a dad in the 21st century. It’s the largest organized community of fathers in the United States. Matt works with reporters, commercial brands, and entertainment companies to encourage more accurate and positive portrayals of fathers and fatherhood in media and advertising. He also hosts the Modern Dads Podcast. In this episode, Matt shares his experience as a stay-at-home dad and tells the story of founding the City Dads Group. Even though male caregivers are becoming increasingly common and accepted throughout America, Matt found it difficult to find a male peer group to talk about parenting, and that’s what led to his creating the City Dads Group. Matt and Stew explore important topics related to successful male caregiving, including how to clarify expectations with your spouse about domestic responsibilities. In the second half of the conversation, listeners share their inspiring experiences as stay-at-home dads. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 3:43: Founding the City Dads Group. Matt founded the City Dads Group nine years ago with the help of Lance Somerfield. He is a stay-at-home father who has two kids. 30:24: Edgar’s story. A radio show listener describes what it’s been like for him as an African American stay-at-home dad. 37:57: Negotiating parental responsibilities. Stew and Matt discuss how couples have to continually talk about how they’re allocating parental responsibilities. Matt emphasizes the importance of agreeing on performance standards, such as the operational definition of a “clean” room. 42:31: Kelly’s story. Another listener shares compelling advice to fathers based on his experience as a stay-at-home dad. Ep 20. Catherine Steiner-Adair: Family Relationships in the Digital Age Ep 20. Catherine Steiner-Adair: Family Relationships in the Digital Age Wed, 10 May 2017 10:30:55 GMT 30:35 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/321896589 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-20-catherine-steiner-adair-family-relations-digital-age Catherine Steiner-Adair wants to ameliorate the … full Catherine Steiner-Adair wants to ameliorate the negative effects of social media and technology on family life. She is a clinical psychologist at Harvard Medical School and author of The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age, which examines the ways technology and media change how children learn and grow. Catherine educates parents about how to balance the benefits of technology while reducing the risks they pose. She has identified numerous ways to help parents navigate the digital age with their children. Stew and Catherine talk about the impact of technology on kids and the boundaries between work and family life. Catherine has seen in her research and counseling that parents are ignoring their children and focusing instead on their smartphones and that children have diminishing levels of self-regulation and capacity for deep play. She talks about what parents can do to to enjoy the benefits while reducing the negative impact of digital devices. Listen and learn some things about how to live in harmony with technology. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:58 Catherine’s history with technology addiction. Her research began in her own home with her son’s addiction to gaming. She was inspired to conduct a global survey and found surprisingly similar trends among kids across age groups. 9:38 Creating technology-free time. Kids need parental attention, and technology can get in the way of this. 13:28 The consequences of technology on kids. Unchecked technology usage causes kids to be less likely to develop normal capacity for focus, attention, and deep thinking. 17:15 Technology’s place in the home. Catherine provides a set of questions for parents to consider when evaluating technology’s place in the home. Parents should set the example for technology usage for kids. She suggests actions you can take to create better relationships between your family and the digital world. Catherine Steiner-Adair wants to ameliorate the negative effects of social media and technology on family life. She is a clinical psychologist at Harvard Medical School and author of The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age, which examines the ways technology and media change how children learn and grow. Catherine educates parents about how to balance the benefits of technology while reducing the risks they pose. She has identified numerous ways to help parents navigate the digital age with their children. Stew and Catherine talk about the impact of technology on kids and the boundaries between work and family life. Catherine has seen in her research and counseling that parents are ignoring their children and focusing instead on their smartphones and that children have diminishing levels of self-regulation and capacity for deep play. She talks about what parents can do to to enjoy the benefits while reducing the negative impact of digital devices. Listen and learn some things about how to live in harmony with technology. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:58 Catherine’s history with technology addiction. Her research began in her own home with her son’s addiction to gaming. She was inspired to conduct a global survey and found surprisingly similar trends among kids across age groups. 9:38 Creating technology-free time. Kids need parental attention, and technology can get in the way of this. 13:28 The consequences of technology on kids. Unchecked technology usage causes kids to be less likely to develop normal capacity for focus, attention, and deep thinking. 17:15 Technology’s place in the home. Catherine provides a set of questions for parents to consider when evaluating technology’s place in the home. Parents should set the example for technology usage for kids. She suggests actions you can take to create better relationships between your family and the digital world. Ep 19. Sam Calagione: Founder Of Dogfish Head Brewery Ep 19. Sam Calagione: Founder Of Dogfish Head Brewery Wed, 03 May 2017 12:29:00 GMT 27:17 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/320657753 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-19-sam-calagione-founder-dogfish-head-brewery Stew Friedman talks with Sam Calagione, Founder a… full Ep 18. Michael Baime: Mindfulness Master Ep 18. Michael Baime: Mindfulness Master Wed, 26 Apr 2017 19:27:19 GMT 34:34 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/319616509 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-18-michael-baime-mindfulness-master Michael Baime is a professor of medicine at the U… full Michael Baime is a professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and founding director Director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness. Michael started the program to help professionals reduce stress and increase performance. Since 1992 the Program has trained more than 10,000 people in mindfulness-based stress management. An increasing body of research shows that it works. Michael has developed numerous courses on mindfulness meditation and mind-body medicine through the Penn Program for Mindfulness, the most popular being an eight-week stress-management course. In this conversation, Michael explains mindfulness, an often vague and misused concept, so listeners can understand how it works and why it is so useful. Stew and Michael explore the benefits of mindfulness Michael has observed as director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness. Perhaps the most important is that people find a greater sense of meaning in their lives. Just as with physical fitness, the many benefits of mindfulness are available to all, but deliberate practice is necessary. Listen and learn from a true master how mindfulness can enhance your work and the rest of your life. Show notes (times when new topics start) 2:15 - What is mindfulness. Mindfulness is both like falling in love and working out: difficult, but worth it. 13:15 - Finding meaning in the life you have. Hospitals are using mindfulness programs to help doctors find more meaning their work and become more engaged with their patients. 16:35 - Mindfulness decreases stress and anxiety. The eight-week mindfulness course at Penn Medicine helps you let go of apprehension and worry. 23:30 - The power of healing environments. Social environments have a real and powerful effect on our health and well-being. 26:00 - Reducing distraction in the digital age. There are ways to limit our exposure to digital distraction with the practice of mindfulness. Michael Baime is a professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and founding director Director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness. Michael started the program to help professionals reduce stress and increase performance. Since 1992 the Program has trained more than 10,000 people in mindfulness-based stress management. An increasing body of research shows that it works. Michael has developed numerous courses on mindfulness meditation and mind-body medicine through the Penn Program for Mindfulness, the most popular being an eight-week stress-management course. In this conversation, Michael explains mindfulness, an often vague and misused concept, so listeners can understand how it works and why it is so useful. Stew and Michael explore the benefits of mindfulness Michael has observed as director of the Penn Program for Mindfulness. Perhaps the most important is that people find a greater sense of meaning in their lives. Just as with physical fitness, the many benefits of mindfulness are available to all, but deliberate practice is necessary. Listen and learn from a true master how mindfulness can enhance your work and the rest of your life. Show notes (times when new topics start) 2:15 - What is mindfulness. Mindfulness is both like falling in love and working out: difficult, but worth it. 13:15 - Finding meaning in the life you have. Hospitals are using mindfulness programs to help doctors find more meaning their work and become more engaged with their patients. 16:35 - Mindfulness decreases stress and anxiety. The eight-week mindfulness course at Penn Medicine helps you let go of apprehension and worry. 23:30 - The power of healing environments. Social environments have a real and powerful effect on our health and well-being. 26:00 - Reducing distraction in the digital age. There are ways to limit our exposure to digital distraction with the practice of mindfulness. Ep 17. Brad Harrington: Fathers at Home Ep 17. Brad Harrington: Fathers at Home Wed, 19 Apr 2017 17:36:47 GMT 48:48 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/318496184 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-17-brad-harrington-fathers-at-home Brad Harrington is Executive Director of the Bost… full Ep 16. Andy Molinsky: Reach Beyond Your Comfort Zone Ep 16. Andy Molinsky: Reach Beyond Your Comfort Zone Tue, 11 Apr 2017 19:35:34 GMT 42:17 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/317235733 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-16-andy-molinsky-reach-beyond-your-comfort-zone Andy Molinsky is a professor at Brandeis Universi… full Andy Molinsky is a professor at Brandeis University’s International Business School where he helps people develop the insights and courage necessary to act outside their personal and cultural comfort zones. He holds a Ph.D in Organizational Behavior and M.A. in Psychology from Harvard University, and M.A. in International Affairs from Columbia University. His latest book is Reach: A New Strategy to Help You Step Outside Your Comfort Zone, Rise to the Challenge and Build Confidence. In this conversation, Andy describes the five common psychological obstacles we face when trying to create change and how to overcome them to reach important goals at work and in other parts of life. Stew and Andy talk about how to reach beyond these obstacles through conviction in your beliefs, customization to your specific situation, and clarification of what is realistic. Bonus content: This episode includes a call from a couple of Stew’s radio show listeners -- Tara and her mom, as they were driving back to New York from Washington, D. C. -- who describe how Tara reached beyond her comfort zone to find the courage to lobby Congress on behalf of The Epilepsy Foundation. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 7:00 Psychological barriers to change. After surveying a wide range of people, Andy’s research uncovered the five psychological roadblocks that keep us stuck in our comfort zones. 12:00 Three keys overcome psychological challenges. They reduce the fear and anxiety that often comes with the anticipation of taking the leap. 25:30 Change leads to discovery. Stepping outside our comfort zone can lead to the personal discovery that you are more capable of producing change than you previously expected. 29:55 - How one radio listener found the courage to lobby Congress. Stew and Andy took a call from Tara, who overcame her psychological barriers and reached beyond her comfort zone to go to Washington to lobby Congress on behalf of The Epilepsy Foundation. Andy Molinsky is a professor at Brandeis University’s International Business School where he helps people develop the insights and courage necessary to act outside their personal and cultural comfort zones. He holds a Ph.D in Organizational Behavior and M.A. in Psychology from Harvard University, and M.A. in International Affairs from Columbia University. His latest book is Reach: A New Strategy to Help You Step Outside Your Comfort Zone, Rise to the Challenge and Build Confidence. In this conversation, Andy describes the five common psychological obstacles we face when trying to create change and how to overcome them to reach important goals at work and in other parts of life. Stew and Andy talk about how to reach beyond these obstacles through conviction in your beliefs, customization to your specific situation, and clarification of what is realistic. Bonus content: This episode includes a call from a couple of Stew’s radio show listeners -- Tara and her mom, as they were driving back to New York from Washington, D. C. -- who describe how Tara reached beyond her comfort zone to find the courage to lobby Congress on behalf of The Epilepsy Foundation. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 7:00 Psychological barriers to change. After surveying a wide range of people, Andy’s research uncovered the five psychological roadblocks that keep us stuck in our comfort zones. 12:00 Three keys overcome psychological challenges. They reduce the fear and anxiety that often comes with the anticipation of taking the leap. 25:30 Change leads to discovery. Stepping outside our comfort zone can lead to the personal discovery that you are more capable of producing change than you previously expected. 29:55 - How one radio listener found the courage to lobby Congress. Stew and Andy took a call from Tara, who overcame her psychological barriers and reached beyond her comfort zone to go to Washington to lobby Congress on behalf of The Epilepsy Foundation. Ep 15. Doug Conant: World-Class Employee Engagement Ep 15. Doug Conant: World-Class Employee Engagement Wed, 05 Apr 2017 15:46:58 GMT 48:13 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/316241228 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-15-doug-conant-world-class-employee-engagement Doug Conant is founder of Conant Leadership and f… full Ep 14. Arianna Huffington: Founder of Thrive Global and The Huffington Post Ep 14. Arianna Huffington: Founder of Thrive Global and The Huffington Post Wed, 29 Mar 2017 17:02:43 GMT 27:01 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/315076480 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-14-arianna-huffington-thrive-global Arianna Huffington is on a mission to redefine su… full Arianna Huffington is on a mission to redefine success and end burnout. She is founder and CEO of Thrive Global, a corporate and consumer well-being and productivity platform aiming to change the way we work and live. She is founder of The Huffington Post, bestselling author of Thrive and The Sleep Revolution, one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People, and Forbes’ Most Powerful Women. She serves on numerous boards and describes herself as “a mother, sister, flat shoe advocate, and sleep evangelist.” Stew and Arianna talk about the cultural transformation underway in companies throughout America towards greater focus on employee well-being and Thrive Global’s aspirations for contributing to this change. Arianna advocates for setting limits on technology usage to connect to their one’s inner “wisdom, strength, and peace.” She describes recent changes she has made in her own life, which she calls “micro-steps,” and offers research-based advice on what anyone can do to increase the chances of thriving in our tumultuous world. For more articles and tips on how to thrive, visit www.thriveglobal.com and follow @Thrive and @AriannaHuff Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:45. Arianna’s breaking point. Arianna collapsed one day while working at The Huffington Post. This was a wake-up call: she needed to take better care of herself. 4:50. Detoxing from technology. We need to create space in our lives away from technology to connect with our deepest, wisest selves. Find the Phone Bed Arianna describes here. 11:15. Even the best of us need sleep. Thrive Global features articles written by the highest achieving, smartest people in the world with a common message: I need rest to perform at my best. For example, read Amazon’s Jeff Bezos’ article on Thrive Global. 13:35. Helping working parents find harmony. Arianna dispels common parenting myths and describes how companies can be advocates for working parent lifestyles. Arianna Huffington is on a mission to redefine success and end burnout. She is founder and CEO of Thrive Global, a corporate and consumer well-being and productivity platform aiming to change the way we work and live. She is founder of The Huffington Post, bestselling author of Thrive and The Sleep Revolution, one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People, and Forbes’ Most Powerful Women. She serves on numerous boards and describes herself as “a mother, sister, flat shoe advocate, and sleep evangelist.” Stew and Arianna talk about the cultural transformation underway in companies throughout America towards greater focus on employee well-being and Thrive Global’s aspirations for contributing to this change. Arianna advocates for setting limits on technology usage to connect to their one’s inner “wisdom, strength, and peace.” She describes recent changes she has made in her own life, which she calls “micro-steps,” and offers research-based advice on what anyone can do to increase the chances of thriving in our tumultuous world. For more articles and tips on how to thrive, visit www.thriveglobal.com and follow @Thrive and @AriannaHuff Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:45. Arianna’s breaking point. Arianna collapsed one day while working at The Huffington Post. This was a wake-up call: she needed to take better care of herself. 4:50. Detoxing from technology. We need to create space in our lives away from technology to connect with our deepest, wisest selves. Find the Phone Bed Arianna describes here. 11:15. Even the best of us need sleep. Thrive Global features articles written by the highest achieving, smartest people in the world with a common message: I need rest to perform at my best. For example, read Amazon’s Jeff Bezos’ article on Thrive Global. 13:35. Helping working parents find harmony. Arianna dispels common parenting myths and describes how companies can be advocates for working parent lifestyles. Ep 13. Scott Barry Kaufman: The Messy Minds of Creative People Ep 13. Scott Barry Kaufman: The Messy Minds of Creative People Wed, 22 Mar 2017 18:37:20 GMT 34:23 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/313888370 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-13-scott-barry-kaufman-messy-minds-of-creative-people Scott Barry Kaufman is a cognitive psychologist w… full Scott Barry Kaufman is a cognitive psychologist who studies the messy minds of creative people. He is Scientific Director of the Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center and professor of Positive Psychology at The University of Pennsylvania. He teaches the wildly popular Introduction to Positive Psychology. Scott is co-author of Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind, host of The Psychology Podcast, and co-founder of The Creativity Post. In this episode, Stew and Scott talk about Scott’s inspiring personal and professional journey, including how he went from being a student with special needs to earning a Ph.D. from Yale. Scott challenges listeners to focus less on productivity and more on cultivating creative capacity by stepping outside your comfort zone, daydreaming, and committing to your passions -- harmonious but not obsessive passions, that is. He describes the method of active, open-monitoring meditation, provides guidance on how to use it, and explains how it differs from traditional mindfulness techniques. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:20 Scott’s early life. Scott began his education as a special education student, which he was until high school. He would go on to receive a PhD from Yale and an M.Phil from Cambridge. 13:40. Creative, messy minds. The minds of creative people are messy and full of contradictions. Scott gives a great example of a messy mind at work with Baba Brinkman and his rap about natural selection. Check out 18 Habits of Highly Creative People for more. 17:40. The dark side of efficiency. By recklessly pursuing efficiency, we lose creativity. 21:40. Two types of passions. Scott’s research indicates that people with harmonious passion are more resilient and perform better than people with obsessive passions. He talks about Robert Vallerand’s research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and Frank Barron’s work on creativity. 26:35. Mindfulness for creativity. Scott begins each session of his classes with a special type of creativity meditation. Learn how this type of meditation differs from the traditional breathing meditation and how you can use it to enhance creativity. Scott Barry Kaufman is a cognitive psychologist who studies the messy minds of creative people. He is Scientific Director of the Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center and professor of Positive Psychology at The University of Pennsylvania. He teaches the wildly popular Introduction to Positive Psychology. Scott is co-author of Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind, host of The Psychology Podcast, and co-founder of The Creativity Post. In this episode, Stew and Scott talk about Scott’s inspiring personal and professional journey, including how he went from being a student with special needs to earning a Ph.D. from Yale. Scott challenges listeners to focus less on productivity and more on cultivating creative capacity by stepping outside your comfort zone, daydreaming, and committing to your passions -- harmonious but not obsessive passions, that is. He describes the method of active, open-monitoring meditation, provides guidance on how to use it, and explains how it differs from traditional mindfulness techniques. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:20 Scott’s early life. Scott began his education as a special education student, which he was until high school. He would go on to receive a PhD from Yale and an M.Phil from Cambridge. 13:40. Creative, messy minds. The minds of creative people are messy and full of contradictions. Scott gives a great example of a messy mind at work with Baba Brinkman and his rap about natural selection. Check out 18 Habits of Highly Creative People for more. 17:40. The dark side of efficiency. By recklessly pursuing efficiency, we lose creativity. 21:40. Two types of passions. Scott’s research indicates that people with harmonious passion are more resilient and perform better than people with obsessive passions. He talks about Robert Vallerand’s research on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and Frank Barron’s work on creativity. 26:35. Mindfulness for creativity. Scott begins each session of his classes with a special type of creativity meditation. Learn how this type of meditation differs from the traditional breathing meditation and how you can use it to enhance creativity. Ep 12. Emma Seppälä: Cultivating Resilience Ep 12. Emma Seppälä: Cultivating Resilience Wed, 15 Mar 2017 19:58:15 GMT 27:00 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/312583745 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-12-emma-seppala-cultivating-resilience Emma Seppälä is author of The Happiness Track and… full Emma Seppälä is author of The Happiness Track and Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. She is also Co-Director of the Yale College Emotional Intelligence Project at Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and a Lecturer at Yale College, where she teaches The Psychology of Happiness. On top of that, Emma is founder and editor-in-chief of “Fulfillment Daily,” a popular news site dedicated to the science of happiness. Stew and Emma explore misconceptions about success and happiness. Emma describes America’s harmful culture of overwork and its consequences on our bodies and minds. She believes it is possible to cultivate a peaceful lifestyle while having ambitious career goals. They discuss Emma’s happiness research, emphasizing in this conversation steps anyone can take to calm their internal state of mind during stressful times. Emma recommends yoga-based breathing techniques that Stew and Emma explore in depth. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 3:07. Stress and productivity at work. Our culture values working long hours, but this attitude can result in lost productivity due to stress. 11:25. Boosting inner resilience. Many people have goals that require stressful work. Instead of relying on a stress-free work environment, boost your inner resilience. Emma describes a breathing technique she used to enhance resilience in Iraq war veterans. 19:30: Alternating tasks. Just like interval training in the gym, research has shown that alternating between high- and low-focus work is better for performance than working on high-focus activities until you burn out. 20:50: Self-compassion. Failure is a part of life but self-criticism is equivalent to self-sabotage. Emma Seppälä is author of The Happiness Track and Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. She is also Co-Director of the Yale College Emotional Intelligence Project at Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and a Lecturer at Yale College, where she teaches The Psychology of Happiness. On top of that, Emma is founder and editor-in-chief of “Fulfillment Daily,” a popular news site dedicated to the science of happiness. Stew and Emma explore misconceptions about success and happiness. Emma describes America’s harmful culture of overwork and its consequences on our bodies and minds. She believes it is possible to cultivate a peaceful lifestyle while having ambitious career goals. They discuss Emma’s happiness research, emphasizing in this conversation steps anyone can take to calm their internal state of mind during stressful times. Emma recommends yoga-based breathing techniques that Stew and Emma explore in depth. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 3:07. Stress and productivity at work. Our culture values working long hours, but this attitude can result in lost productivity due to stress. 11:25. Boosting inner resilience. Many people have goals that require stressful work. Instead of relying on a stress-free work environment, boost your inner resilience. Emma describes a breathing technique she used to enhance resilience in Iraq war veterans. 19:30: Alternating tasks. Just like interval training in the gym, research has shown that alternating between high- and low-focus work is better for performance than working on high-focus activities until you burn out. 20:50: Self-compassion. Failure is a part of life but self-criticism is equivalent to self-sabotage. Ep 11. Julie Foudy: Soccer Champion and Advocate for Gender Equity Ep 11. Julie Foudy: Soccer Champion and Advocate for Gender Equity Wed, 08 Mar 2017 22:19:19 GMT 22:26 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/311423072 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-11-julie-foudy-soccer-and-gender-equity Julie Foudy, currently an ESPN analyst and proud … full Ep 10. Dave Asprey: Becoming Bulletproof Ep 10. Dave Asprey: Becoming Bulletproof Wed, 01 Mar 2017 20:17:44 GMT 20:00 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/310202339 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-10-dave-asprey-becoming-bulletproof Dave Asprey is founder and CEO of Bulletproof, a … full Dave Asprey is founder and CEO of Bulletproof, a company known for its famous coffee, whose mission is to improve client performance through cutting-edge nutrition. He founded Bulletproof after spending years and over $250,000 to hack his own biology. He lost 100 pounds without counting calories or excessive exercise, used techniques to upgrade his brain by more than 20 IQ points, and lowered his biological age by learning to sleep more efficiently in less time. Dave spreads the Bulletproof message via his Bulletproof Radio, one of the top-ranked health podcasts on iTunes. He is also a Silicon Valley investor, having both advised and invested in multiple startups in the personal health space. Dave took Stew’s Total Leadership course on his way to earning an MBA from Wharton in 2004. Stew and Dave talk in this episode about Bulletproof’s early days and his inspiration for pursuing optimal performance. Dave describes the essence of the Bulletproof lifestyle and the fascinating psychology of will power. Dieting and transforming your life for the better doesn’t have to be an excruciating process, it can be joyful. Listen to find out how from one of the modern masters of quantified self. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:25 Dave’s personal change. Dave learned to focus on what was easy and where he was skilled to achieve massive personal change. 9:00 Quantified self. Dave’s “me-search” experiments (trying new methods on himself) helped him learn how to eat in a new way and boost his personal performance. 12:50 Keys to a high-performance lifestyle. Meditate, sleep better, and exercise smarter. Dave Asprey is founder and CEO of Bulletproof, a company known for its famous coffee, whose mission is to improve client performance through cutting-edge nutrition. He founded Bulletproof after spending years and over $250,000 to hack his own biology. He lost 100 pounds without counting calories or excessive exercise, used techniques to upgrade his brain by more than 20 IQ points, and lowered his biological age by learning to sleep more efficiently in less time. Dave spreads the Bulletproof message via his Bulletproof Radio, one of the top-ranked health podcasts on iTunes. He is also a Silicon Valley investor, having both advised and invested in multiple startups in the personal health space. Dave took Stew’s Total Leadership course on his way to earning an MBA from Wharton in 2004. Stew and Dave talk in this episode about Bulletproof’s early days and his inspiration for pursuing optimal performance. Dave describes the essence of the Bulletproof lifestyle and the fascinating psychology of will power. Dieting and transforming your life for the better doesn’t have to be an excruciating process, it can be joyful. Listen to find out how from one of the modern masters of quantified self. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:25 Dave’s personal change. Dave learned to focus on what was easy and where he was skilled to achieve massive personal change. 9:00 Quantified self. Dave’s “me-search” experiments (trying new methods on himself) helped him learn how to eat in a new way and boost his personal performance. 12:50 Keys to a high-performance lifestyle. Meditate, sleep better, and exercise smarter. Ep 9. Tom Tierney: Co-Founder of the Bridgespan Group Ep 9. Tom Tierney: Co-Founder of the Bridgespan Group Wed, 22 Feb 2017 19:28:32 GMT 25:36 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/309043813 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-9-tom-tierney-co-founder-bridgespan full Ep 8. Scott Sonenshein: To Chase or To Stretch? Ep 8. Scott Sonenshein: To Chase or To Stretch? Thu, 16 Feb 2017 02:05:32 GMT 27:09 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/307966736 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-8-scott-sonenshein-to-chase-or-to-stretch Scott Sonenshein is the Henry Gardiner Symonds Pr… full Scott Sonenshein is the Henry Gardiner Symonds Professor of Management at Rice University. Scott’s book “Stretch” offers a groundbreaking approach to achieving high performance. The stretch mindset is about using resourcefulness and creativity in the face of constraints -- simply put, to achieve more with less. Stew and Scott discuss how listeners can develop a stretch mindset. For more information about this and other episodes, check out workandlifepodcast.com, where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, previous episodes, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 1:50. Silicon Valley. Scott spent time in SF during the dot com bubble. There he saw startups recklessly chasing resources. This inspired his current research. 5:10. Using creativity to stretch. Creativity allows business to use old resources in new ways. 7:15. Embracing constraints. They enable us to do things unconventionally to achieve ours goals. 16:05. How to stretch. There are many ways to develop resourcefulness and creativity in work and other parts of life. Scott Sonenshein is the Henry Gardiner Symonds Professor of Management at Rice University. Scott’s book “Stretch” offers a groundbreaking approach to achieving high performance. The stretch mindset is about using resourcefulness and creativity in the face of constraints -- simply put, to achieve more with less. Stew and Scott discuss how listeners can develop a stretch mindset. For more information about this and other episodes, check out workandlifepodcast.com, where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, previous episodes, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 1:50. Silicon Valley. Scott spent time in SF during the dot com bubble. There he saw startups recklessly chasing resources. This inspired his current research. 5:10. Using creativity to stretch. Creativity allows business to use old resources in new ways. 7:15. Embracing constraints. They enable us to do things unconventionally to achieve ours goals. 16:05. How to stretch. There are many ways to develop resourcefulness and creativity in work and other parts of life. Ep 7. Cal Newport: Focus for Success in a Distracted World Ep 7. Cal Newport: Focus for Success in a Distracted World Wed, 08 Feb 2017 18:44:39 GMT 26:57 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/306754062 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-7-cal-newport-focus-for-success-in-distracted-world Cal Newport is a professor of Computer Science at… full Cal Newport is a professor of Computer Science at Georgetown and author of Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World. In Deep Work, Cal argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the modern workplace and that those who master it have better chances of success in all parts of life. Stew and Cal discuss actionable guidelines for developing the capacity to do deep work. Two of the many useful suggestions in this episode are to quit (or radically reduce) social media and embrace boredom. For more information about this and other episodes, check out workandlifepodcast.com, where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, previous episodes, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:20. Overview of deep work. Cal defines deep work as focusing on a cognitively demanding task for a significant period of time, an essential skill for modern workers. 6:00. Guidelines for Deep Work. How to do deep work. 7:20. Quit social media. The costs of using social media and how to reduce them. 13:30. Embracing boredom. Training your mind to benefit from deep work involves learning how to embrace boredom, which is easier than it sounds. 16:30. Making time for focus. How to carve out the time and space for deep work wherever and whenever you do your work. Cal Newport is a professor of Computer Science at Georgetown and author of Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World. In Deep Work, Cal argues that focus is the new I.Q. in the modern workplace and that those who master it have better chances of success in all parts of life. Stew and Cal discuss actionable guidelines for developing the capacity to do deep work. Two of the many useful suggestions in this episode are to quit (or radically reduce) social media and embrace boredom. For more information about this and other episodes, check out workandlifepodcast.com, where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, previous episodes, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 2:20. Overview of deep work. Cal defines deep work as focusing on a cognitively demanding task for a significant period of time, an essential skill for modern workers. 6:00. Guidelines for Deep Work. How to do deep work. 7:20. Quit social media. The costs of using social media and how to reduce them. 13:30. Embracing boredom. Training your mind to benefit from deep work involves learning how to embrace boredom, which is easier than it sounds. 16:30. Making time for focus. How to carve out the time and space for deep work wherever and whenever you do your work. Ep 6. Emily Esfahani Smith: The Four Pillars of Meaning Ep 6. Emily Esfahani Smith: The Four Pillars of Meaning Sat, 28 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 28:10 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/305736427 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-6-emily-esfahani-smith-four-pillars-of-meaning Emily Esfahani Smith is author of “The Power of M… full Emily Esfahani Smith is author of “The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life that Matters.” Emily has explored the essence of what brings meaning into our lives. She melds perspectives from a variety of sources -- contemporary psychologists, ancient philosophers, historical figures, and others -- to show the value of what she calls the “four pillars of meaning,” each of which she and Stew discuss in this episode. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out the blog post on this episode at http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/ees , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 5:50. Meaning and happiness. Finding meaning in life is not about finding happiness. 8:15. Belonging. One pillar of meaning is the feeling of being connected to others. 11:55. Purpose. The second pillar is having a sense of purpose for one’s life, which need not necessarily be a grand enterprise but can be simply gaining respect in your profession or helping your family function. 16:50. Storytelling. We tell stories about key episodes in our lives to create a deeper understanding of our identities and thereby enhance meaning. 21:35. Transcendance. Feeling ego-less and connected to the infinite is the fourth pillar of meaning, and it can be experienced in nature, religion, and in other ways. Emily Esfahani Smith is author of “The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life that Matters.” Emily has explored the essence of what brings meaning into our lives. She melds perspectives from a variety of sources -- contemporary psychologists, ancient philosophers, historical figures, and others -- to show the value of what she calls the “four pillars of meaning,” each of which she and Stew discuss in this episode. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out the blog post on this episode at http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/ees , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Show Notes (times when new topics start) 5:50. Meaning and happiness. Finding meaning in life is not about finding happiness. 8:15. Belonging. One pillar of meaning is the feeling of being connected to others. 11:55. Purpose. The second pillar is having a sense of purpose for one’s life, which need not necessarily be a grand enterprise but can be simply gaining respect in your profession or helping your family function. 16:50. Storytelling. We tell stories about key episodes in our lives to create a deeper understanding of our identities and thereby enhance meaning. 21:35. Transcendance. Feeling ego-less and connected to the infinite is the fourth pillar of meaning, and it can be experienced in nature, religion, and in other ways. Ep 5. Sam Polk: For The Love of Money Ep 5. Sam Polk: For The Love of Money Sun, 22 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 33:18 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/304518959 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-5-sam-polk-for-the-love-of-money Stew talks with Sam Polk, a former hedge fund tra… full Stew talks with Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader. Polk came to the hard-won realization that he needed to leave that lifestyle and went on to found two organizations that bring healthy food to poor communities in Los Angeles: Everytable and Groceryships. His New York Times opinion piece “For the Love of Money” told this story and had a big impact. He then wrote a powerful book by the same title in which he chronicles his addiction to wealth, as he calls it, and his struggle to overcome it. Stew and Sam discuss discuss the evolution of Sam’s views and values as he moved from Wall Street to more meaningful work. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/polk , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Stew talks with Sam Polk, a former hedge fund trader. Polk came to the hard-won realization that he needed to leave that lifestyle and went on to found two organizations that bring healthy food to poor communities in Los Angeles: Everytable and Groceryships. His New York Times opinion piece “For the Love of Money” told this story and had a big impact. He then wrote a powerful book by the same title in which he chronicles his addiction to wealth, as he calls it, and his struggle to overcome it. Stew and Sam discuss discuss the evolution of Sam’s views and values as he moved from Wall Street to more meaningful work. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/polk , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Ep​ ​4.​ ​Anne-Marie​ ​Slaughter:​ ​Caregivers​ ​and​ ​Breadwinners Ep​ ​4.​ ​Anne-Marie​ ​Slaughter:​ ​Caregivers​ ​and​ ​Breadwinners Mon, 16 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 32:48 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/302249752 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-4-anne-marie-slaughter-caregivers-and-breadwinners Stew​ ​talks​ ​with​ ​Anne-Marie​ ​Slaughter,​ ​​… full Stew​ ​talks​ ​with​ ​Anne-Marie​ ​Slaughter,​ ​​President​ ​and​ ​CEO​ ​of​ ​the​ ​New​ ​America​ ​Foundation​ ​and author​ ​of​ ​the​ ​ground-breaking​ ​​Atlantic​ ​​article​ ​“Why​ ​Women​ ​Still​ ​Can’t​ ​Have​ ​it​ ​All,”​ ​a​ ​catalyst​ ​for national​ ​dialogue​ ​on​ ​the​ ​scarcity​ ​of​ ​women​ ​in​ ​executive​ ​positions.​ ​​ ​They​ ​discuss​ ​the​ ​evolution​ ​of Slaughter’s​ ​views​ ​since​ ​writing​ ​that​ ​article​ ​in​ ​2012​ ​and​ ​how​ ​she​ ​now​ ​advocates​ ​for​ ​more​ ​progressive gender​ ​roles​ ​for​ ​men​ ​and​ ​women​ ​at​ ​home​ ​and​ ​in​ ​the​ ​workplace. For​ ​more​ ​information​ ​about​ ​this​ ​and​ ​previous​ ​episodes,​ ​check​ ​out​ www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/ams, where​ ​you​ ​can​ ​find​ ​show​ ​notes,​ ​links​ ​to​ ​resources​ ​discussed​ ​in​ ​the​ ​conversation,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​roster of​ ​Stew’s​ ​guests​ ​you​ ​can​ ​look​ ​forward​ ​to​ ​hearing​ ​soon. Stew​ ​talks​ ​with​ ​Anne-Marie​ ​Slaughter,​ ​​President​ ​and​ ​CEO​ ​of​ ​the​ ​New​ ​America​ ​Foundation​ ​and author​ ​of​ ​the​ ​ground-breaking​ ​​Atlantic​ ​​article​ ​“Why​ ​Women​ ​Still​ ​Can’t​ ​Have​ ​it​ ​All,”​ ​a​ ​catalyst​ ​for national​ ​dialogue​ ​on​ ​the​ ​scarcity​ ​of​ ​women​ ​in​ ​executive​ ​positions.​ ​​ ​They​ ​discuss​ ​the​ ​evolution​ ​of Slaughter’s​ ​views​ ​since​ ​writing​ ​that​ ​article​ ​in​ ​2012​ ​and​ ​how​ ​she​ ​now​ ​advocates​ ​for​ ​more​ ​progressive gender​ ​roles​ ​for​ ​men​ ​and​ ​women​ ​at​ ​home​ ​and​ ​in​ ​the​ ​workplace. For​ ​more​ ​information​ ​about​ ​this​ ​and​ ​previous​ ​episodes,​ ​check​ ​out​ www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/ams, where​ ​you​ ​can​ ​find​ ​show​ ​notes,​ ​links​ ​to​ ​resources​ ​discussed​ ​in​ ​the​ ​conversation,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​roster of​ ​Stew’s​ ​guests​ ​you​ ​can​ ​look​ ​forward​ ​to​ ​hearing​ ​soon. Ep 1. David Burkus: The Death of Email Ep 1. David Burkus: The Death of Email Fri, 13 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 28:32 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/292720805 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-1-david-burkus-the-death-of-email David Burkus is a bestselling author, successful … full Ep 2. Julie Smolyanksy: CEO of LifeWay Foods Ep 2. Julie Smolyanksy: CEO of LifeWay Foods Fri, 13 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 29:44 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/292721191 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-2-julie-smolyansky-ceo-lifeway-foods In this episode, Stew talked with Julie Smolyansk… full In this episode, Stew talked with Julie Smolyansky, CEO of LifeWay Foods. Julie became CEO of LifeWay at the age of 27 and has since grown it to over $130 million in annual revenue. Her dedication to community impact and her commitment to health and fitness are among the creative ways she has found to integrate work and the rest of her life. You’re sure to be inspired and informed by her story. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/julie-smolyansky , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. In this episode, Stew talked with Julie Smolyansky, CEO of LifeWay Foods. Julie became CEO of LifeWay at the age of 27 and has since grown it to over $130 million in annual revenue. Her dedication to community impact and her commitment to health and fitness are among the creative ways she has found to integrate work and the rest of her life. You’re sure to be inspired and informed by her story. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/julie-smolyansky , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. Ep 3. Sarah Kagan: Caring for Aging Parents Ep 3. Sarah Kagan: Caring for Aging Parents Thu, 12 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT 23:30 tag:soundcloud,2010:tracks/296363018 no https://shows.pippa.io/workandlifepodcast/ep-3-sarah-kagan-caring-for-aging-parents In this episode, Stew talked with Sarah Kagan, pr… full In this episode, Stew talked with Sarah Kagan, professor of Gerontological Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. She is helping to destigmatize aging in our society by sharing scientific facts about the abilities of older people. In this conversation she offers both practical tips for middle-aged people dealing with elderly parents and advice about how businesses can better meet the needs of their employees with elderly parents. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/2016/11/12/ep-3-sarah-kagan-caring-for-aging-parents , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon. In this episode, Stew talked with Sarah Kagan, professor of Gerontological Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. She is helping to destigmatize aging in our society by sharing scientific facts about the abilities of older people. In this conversation she offers both practical tips for middle-aged people dealing with elderly parents and advice about how businesses can better meet the needs of their employees with elderly parents. For more information about this and previous episodes, check out http://www.workandlifepodcast.com/blog/2016/11/12/ep-3-sarah-kagan-caring-for-aging-parents , where you can find show notes, links to resources discussed in the conversation, and the roster of Stew’s guests you can look forward to hearing soon.