60 pippa.io <![CDATA[WPblab - A WordPress Social Media Show]]> http://www.wpwatercooler.com/shows/wpblab en 2018 - Jason Tucker & Bridget Willard Jason Tucker & Bridget Willard no Jason Tucker & Bridget Willard info+5b315a2c7b9154572d183730@mg.pippa.io episodic https://assets.pippa.io/shows/5b315a2c7b9154572d183730/show-cover.jpg http://www.wpwatercooler.com/shows/wpblab <![CDATA[WPblab - A WordPress Social Media Show]]> https://feed.pippa.io/public/shows/5b315a2c7b9154572d183730 <![CDATA[WPblab EP112 – WordPress Marketing: Turning Support FAQ into Content Marketing]]> Fri, 21 Sep 2018 14:01:50 GMT 57:05 5ba464576518149f25544622 no full 112 Repurposing Content


DON’T - go to someone else’s website, highlight, copy and paste onto your site - that is bad!


DO - open up your email, look at the emails that your customers are sending you (the questions they ask), THOSE are the questions you should be using to turn into your FAQs and to fill content pages on your site.


HOW:

  • Don’t assume you have to start with a title (a concept is fine) but if you have one, use it!
  • Ask yourself what are the basic questions that your customers frequently ask or need to know? Questions via, phone / email / in person / help desk
  • Make sure to give your marketing team access to any help desk software you use, so that they can see what customers are frequently asking and where they get stuck.
  • Write it down or start a Google Doc and keep track of the Q’s
  • Go do a Google search - they’ll show “people also ask” which might frame it in a way that makes for a better title  (pay attention to the context)
  • Try using anchor tags in your FAQs to help people navigate better


If you are answering the same questions all the time, why waste time repeating yourself?  You’re better off adding the answer on a page or as part of an FAQ or blog post on your website.  That way, when you receive the same question again, you can share the page and your well-worded answer with your customers!


Jason uses a plugin that will take all the header tags on the page and use it to create a table of contents at the top of the page with anchor tag links that will direct customers to the exact spot on the page that will answer their questions.


Check in with your receptionists or the people answering the phones at your business - have them make a list of the questions they are receiving and what people are calling about.  If they are digging around on your site and can’t find things and calling for the answer, maybe it’s time to re-evaluate your content!


https://wordpress.org/plugins/easy-table-of-contents/


https://www.wpbeginner.com/plugins/how-to-create-a-table-of-content-in-wordpress-posts-and-pages/



Richard at WPHelpdesk.nl - He gets comments & questions through a gravity form on his website and when he answers the questions, he posts it as a blog post on his website. This is a great way to create content that’s tailored to your users!


Instead of building a site and hoping people will use it (and that you have the right content), you’re building it based on exactly what your audience needs.  Do right by your audience and your audience will find you! (it’s kind of hard to know who your audience is until you start having conversations!)


Sometimes  your customers can be frustrating - they don’t get it!  When it’s your specialization, it’s hard - you won’t be able to see why they don’t understand. A lot of times the way you communicate when someone doesn’t get it can increase frustration.  


How to excel at communicating with your customers is by offering true education. Use your FAQs to help them understand your products and services. You want an educated customer base that values your products!


Use multiple ways to communicate - try video or audio along with your text, and infographics. (Always include text on the page with your videos - if it’s just video, it will have zero SEO value)


Don’t just think of one way to answer a question.  Think of different ways the question could be asked and rephrase / reframe it.  It will help your google search results too.


https://bridgetwillard.com/social-media-success-adjust-and-adapt-to-change/


Bridget  took a question to google and made note of the different “people also ask” questions and answered each one using them as an H2 on her page!


Your content marketing should be easy to produce. Take a look at the bullet points you include on  your website about the services you provide - each of those bullet points can be the starting point for a blog post!


You can also take a look at your reviews (from Yelp, etc.) and use them to frame a blog post around!  Also, consider reaching out to the reviewer to do a Case Study. The who, what, when, where, how of their experience with your product. The more technical the problem, the more detailed the case study. Case studies are also really excellent for pre-sales!


Russell tends to blog straight from his head and will write exactly as he thinks and not as someone would typically write..  What’s great about that is that people will search exactly as they think too and will get results from his site they might not find elsewhere.


Think about it from your mom’s, brother’s, uncle’s, grandparent’s point of view - what would they ask, how would they phrase it?  You want to answer the questions that your customers / readers / consumers are going to ask.


Use Help Scout or equivalent - it’s a great way to aggregate the info coming in.  Or use Gmail and their Labels feature to help organize your conversations and keep track of them. (Also, remember to keep your subject lines relevant to your emails to make them easier to search!)



TOOLS AND TIPS

Bridget: Use Google Drive https://www.google.com/drive/ to help organize your content/files and make it accessible for posting with your phone (download the app)


Jason: Believes in putting an online chat widget on your site (though, it’s not the answer to everything - someone needs to be actively looking at / responding to it) - great if you have Help Scout https://www.helpscout.net/. There is a feature called Beacon that can help lead people to answers and if they aren’t found, will direct them to chat to get help from a person!

Also Crisp Chat https://crisp.chat/en/ - allows you to chat with your website visitors

Slack https://slack.com/  is great too!  You can keep conversations organized in channels.

Franz https://meetfranz.com/ Organize all your social messaging in one place!


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade @HeySherie



]]>
Repurposing Content


DON’T - go to someone else’s website, highlight, copy and paste onto your site - that is bad!


DO - open up your email, look at the emails that your customers are sending you (the questions they ask), THOSE are the questions you should be using to turn into your FAQs and to fill content pages on your site.


HOW:

  • Don’t assume you have to start with a title (a concept is fine) but if you have one, use it!
  • Ask yourself what are the basic questions that your customers frequently ask or need to know? Questions via, phone / email / in person / help desk
  • Make sure to give your marketing team access to any help desk software you use, so that they can see what customers are frequently asking and where they get stuck.
  • Write it down or start a Google Doc and keep track of the Q’s
  • Go do a Google search - they’ll show “people also ask” which might frame it in a way that makes for a better title  (pay attention to the context)
  • Try using anchor tags in your FAQs to help people navigate better


If you are answering the same questions all the time, why waste time repeating yourself?  You’re better off adding the answer on a page or as part of an FAQ or blog post on your website.  That way, when you receive the same question again, you can share the page and your well-worded answer with your customers!


Jason uses a plugin that will take all the header tags on the page and use it to create a table of contents at the top of the page with anchor tag links that will direct customers to the exact spot on the page that will answer their questions.


Check in with your receptionists or the people answering the phones at your business - have them make a list of the questions they are receiving and what people are calling about.  If they are digging around on your site and can’t find things and calling for the answer, maybe it’s time to re-evaluate your content!


https://wordpress.org/plugins/easy-table-of-contents/


https://www.wpbeginner.com/plugins/how-to-create-a-table-of-content-in-wordpress-posts-and-pages/



Richard at WPHelpdesk.nl - He gets comments & questions through a gravity form on his website and when he answers the questions, he posts it as a blog post on his website. This is a great way to create content that’s tailored to your users!


Instead of building a site and hoping people will use it (and that you have the right content), you’re building it based on exactly what your audience needs.  Do right by your audience and your audience will find you! (it’s kind of hard to know who your audience is until you start having conversations!)


Sometimes  your customers can be frustrating - they don’t get it!  When it’s your specialization, it’s hard - you won’t be able to see why they don’t understand. A lot of times the way you communicate when someone doesn’t get it can increase frustration.  


How to excel at communicating with your customers is by offering true education. Use your FAQs to help them understand your products and services. You want an educated customer base that values your products!


Use multiple ways to communicate - try video or audio along with your text, and infographics. (Always include text on the page with your videos - if it’s just video, it will have zero SEO value)


Don’t just think of one way to answer a question.  Think of different ways the question could be asked and rephrase / reframe it.  It will help your google search results too.


https://bridgetwillard.com/social-media-success-adjust-and-adapt-to-change/


Bridget  took a question to google and made note of the different “people also ask” questions and answered each one using them as an H2 on her page!


Your content marketing should be easy to produce. Take a look at the bullet points you include on  your website about the services you provide - each of those bullet points can be the starting point for a blog post!


You can also take a look at your reviews (from Yelp, etc.) and use them to frame a blog post around!  Also, consider reaching out to the reviewer to do a Case Study. The who, what, when, where, how of their experience with your product. The more technical the problem, the more detailed the case study. Case studies are also really excellent for pre-sales!


Russell tends to blog straight from his head and will write exactly as he thinks and not as someone would typically write..  What’s great about that is that people will search exactly as they think too and will get results from his site they might not find elsewhere.


Think about it from your mom’s, brother’s, uncle’s, grandparent’s point of view - what would they ask, how would they phrase it?  You want to answer the questions that your customers / readers / consumers are going to ask.


Use Help Scout or equivalent - it’s a great way to aggregate the info coming in.  Or use Gmail and their Labels feature to help organize your conversations and keep track of them. (Also, remember to keep your subject lines relevant to your emails to make them easier to search!)



TOOLS AND TIPS

Bridget: Use Google Drive https://www.google.com/drive/ to help organize your content/files and make it accessible for posting with your phone (download the app)


Jason: Believes in putting an online chat widget on your site (though, it’s not the answer to everything - someone needs to be actively looking at / responding to it) - great if you have Help Scout https://www.helpscout.net/. There is a feature called Beacon that can help lead people to answers and if they aren’t found, will direct them to chat to get help from a person!

Also Crisp Chat https://crisp.chat/en/ - allows you to chat with your website visitors

Slack https://slack.com/  is great too!  You can keep conversations organized in channels.

Franz https://meetfranz.com/ Organize all your social messaging in one place!


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade @HeySherie



]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP111 – Beyond Local: Why Market Yourself Internationally]]> Thu, 06 Sep 2018 15:53:03 GMT 1:00:39 5ba120e6b8c55beb1499bf9f no full 111 ]]> ]]> <![CDATA[WPblab EP110 - Why is syndicated content bad?]]> Thu, 23 Aug 2018 15:47:31 GMT 30:05 5ba11f4d63be3d60041bb377 no full 110 <![CDATA[WPblab EP109 - Networking the Right Way: A guide to attending, speaking, and hosting Meetups]]> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 23:48:06 GMT 59:14 5b6a2f967ca0de616cec46b3 no full 109 Bridget was late to her very first meetup and ended up having to sit up front, and when it was over, she just left - “don’t do that!” ;)


Jason had a similar experience, but he likes sitting in the front row! His first meetup had nothing to do with WordPress. He threw a bunch of search terms at Meetup.com and the Adobe Software meetup kept coming up so he went! Met a guy the first time there who encouraged him to speak at the very next meetup!


Attending your first meetup:

  • Be on time (or early!)
  • Have a 10-sec intro or “elevator pitch” available to introduce yourself - don’t try to sound clever, just say your name and some quick things about who you are - “If your grandma doesn’t know what you do by reading your twitter bio…”
  • Sit where you can hear/see easily
  • Meetup.com is a good resource for finding things you like
  • If you’re a ‘doer’ and want to get involved in your meetup, sit back for a bit and see what people are NOT doing - then offer to do that!
  • Take notes and share them! It’s a great way to help.
  • Use a photo of yourself (that actually looks like you) on meetup.com (or on social)
  • If you raise your hand with a question, make it a “question”, not a statement. Ask something that actually will have a good answer and further the conversation.


Organizing your meetup:

  • Sometimes you hear people say “there’s not enough people speaking at meetups”, but Bridget asks the question “Are you asking people to speak?”
  • Recognize that you have different kinds of people in your meetup that might want to help, some are introverts and some are extroverts - they may want to help but won’t speak up
  • It’s important to have co-leaders because each leader will have different gifts & strengths
  • Speakers -- NO hard pitching!
  • Know and follow the ‘code of conduct’. Make sure to create a ‘safe space’ in your meetup
  • Start promoting at least two weeks in advance
  • Create a facebook group or slack account so that people can connect in between meetups or re-connect if they’re not able to attend one


Bridget got involved with WordCamps when Alex Vasquez reached out to her (since she was a social media expert) and *asked* her to do social media for an upcoming Camp - and she’s been volunteering every since! She was ‘doing her thing’ and others recognized her gifts.


As meetup organizers, Bridget and Jen try to pay attention to what people’s gifts / strengths are.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow%27s_hierarchy_of_needs - ‘A Theory of Human Motivation’


If you catch someone spending a lot of time focusing on something or asking questions about something not directly related to the night’s topic, why not suggest “Maybe you can talk about that at one of our upcoming meetups!” What’s the worst that could happen? You might get a great speaker!


It’s not that people aren’t experienced or don’t have the needed gifts, but many people just need to be asked. They either don’t want to brag about their abilities or they may even struggle with ‘imposter syndrome’.


Ask “what are you working on? let’s see it!” It’s a great way to get everyone involved and possibly brainstorm new topics. You and your fellow organizers can speak every month but if you ask and seek input / topics / speakers / from your members, everyone can feel included.


If you can get people to talk, even if it’s just answering questions, eventually they’ll become more comfortable with speaking and may even be encouraged to speak at a future meetup


The way you present or comment on a tool/plugin should not reflect on how you view the user.  Don’t make it sound like you’re the only one who is smart because you use “X” plugin instead of “Y” plugin. Share pro/cons and thoughts without being judgy! Try to be host/plugin agnostic as a leader of a meetup. Our job as facilitators is to create a psychologically safe place.


Be careful with gender-specific meetups - be gender-inclusive, not exclusive. You can focus your content and style at women, but you shouldn’t exclude men from attending. We can all learn from each other - men and women do things differently but all have something to offer.


We have a lot of seasoned WordPress professionals who no longer want to attend meetups because it’s too basic for them. We also have very new beginners who feel it’s too advanced. It’s nice, when possible, to be able to mix your content or have different meetups aimed at different levels.


RELATED: EP283 – Who are we presenting to at a WordCamp or WordPress Meetup? https://www.wpwatercooler.com/video/ep283-wpwatercooler/


If we approach any group of people and think “there’s nothing I can learn from any of these people” then we’re looking at it all wrong. There’s always something to be gained from networking and mentoring with other people. We want to get bigger jobs, so we should partner up with each other!


We’re more than just what we do for a living - we have unique interests/skills outside of WordPress - like yoga!


When Matt Cromwell went to WP Las Vegas a few years ago, he went to a beginner’s workshop (even though he’s an advanced user) and got to hear so much for new users that he was then able to take back with him and say “I’m going to do this differently from now on”.


We go through phases where we are advanced at some things and beginners at other things. It’s important to be a lifelong learner, there’s always something new you can learn and people you can learn from.


Try not to always talk about only the commercial plugin options and the pricier hosting options, you have to remember sometimes your audience is Joe, the cat-blogger! Not everyone works for a WordPress agency!


Promoting and blogging about your meetup is really important. Even over the holidays - that is often when people are the loneliest and need connection with others the most.  Try to promote at least 2 weeks out and use more than just meetup.com to advertise.


Taking photos during your events can be super helpful - especially if you use those photos to promote the group on social media in between events


If you’re going to have your meetup on a week night, it can be tricky for people to get dinner before your meeting, so maybe provide cheap eats (pizza, etc) or try to meet up beforehand for a quick bite together.


In your meetup event page, comment & reply to people when they say they can’t attend or when they give feedback on the meeting - be interactive!


If you have a facebook page, try to schedule facebook events as reminders, and if it’s possible, even have someone record it and share it via facebook live during the meetup. (Can even be done with a cellphone)


Andrea Middleton: WordCamps are a celebration of the meetups that happen the whole year before!


Try not to have all of the meetup/WordCamp organizers sit together at events, it can be intimidating and exclusionary - it also makes it harder to focus on meeting new members and getting to know each other better.


Try to do your staff/organizer meetups not at the meetup event. Schedule a separate time for it.


Have consistency - it’s a HUGE factor - people who don’t attend regularly but know your schedule are able to hop in down the road when they may have more time to attend


Being a community means investing your time in other people. ~ Bridget


TOOLS AND TIPS

Bridget: Use Gmail to help clean-up your constant contact email list by searching gmail addresses to find out if they have a profile with their first and last name listed


Jason: There isn’t really any good formatting for doing “stories” on social media - found a great app for phones that allows you to make and customize your story - Unfold

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/unfold-create-stories/id1247275033?mt=8

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.moonlab.unfold&hl=en_US






Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade @HeySherie

]]>
Bridget was late to her very first meetup and ended up having to sit up front, and when it was over, she just left - “don’t do that!” ;)


Jason had a similar experience, but he likes sitting in the front row! His first meetup had nothing to do with WordPress. He threw a bunch of search terms at Meetup.com and the Adobe Software meetup kept coming up so he went! Met a guy the first time there who encouraged him to speak at the very next meetup!


Attending your first meetup:

  • Be on time (or early!)
  • Have a 10-sec intro or “elevator pitch” available to introduce yourself - don’t try to sound clever, just say your name and some quick things about who you are - “If your grandma doesn’t know what you do by reading your twitter bio…”
  • Sit where you can hear/see easily
  • Meetup.com is a good resource for finding things you like
  • If you’re a ‘doer’ and want to get involved in your meetup, sit back for a bit and see what people are NOT doing - then offer to do that!
  • Take notes and share them! It’s a great way to help.
  • Use a photo of yourself (that actually looks like you) on meetup.com (or on social)
  • If you raise your hand with a question, make it a “question”, not a statement. Ask something that actually will have a good answer and further the conversation.


Organizing your meetup:

  • Sometimes you hear people say “there’s not enough people speaking at meetups”, but Bridget asks the question “Are you asking people to speak?”
  • Recognize that you have different kinds of people in your meetup that might want to help, some are introverts and some are extroverts - they may want to help but won’t speak up
  • It’s important to have co-leaders because each leader will have different gifts & strengths
  • Speakers -- NO hard pitching!
  • Know and follow the ‘code of conduct’. Make sure to create a ‘safe space’ in your meetup
  • Start promoting at least two weeks in advance
  • Create a facebook group or slack account so that people can connect in between meetups or re-connect if they’re not able to attend one


Bridget got involved with WordCamps when Alex Vasquez reached out to her (since she was a social media expert) and *asked* her to do social media for an upcoming Camp - and she’s been volunteering every since! She was ‘doing her thing’ and others recognized her gifts.


As meetup organizers, Bridget and Jen try to pay attention to what people’s gifts / strengths are.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow%27s_hierarchy_of_needs - ‘A Theory of Human Motivation’


If you catch someone spending a lot of time focusing on something or asking questions about something not directly related to the night’s topic, why not suggest “Maybe you can talk about that at one of our upcoming meetups!” What’s the worst that could happen? You might get a great speaker!


It’s not that people aren’t experienced or don’t have the needed gifts, but many people just need to be asked. They either don’t want to brag about their abilities or they may even struggle with ‘imposter syndrome’.


Ask “what are you working on? let’s see it!” It’s a great way to get everyone involved and possibly brainstorm new topics. You and your fellow organizers can speak every month but if you ask and seek input / topics / speakers / from your members, everyone can feel included.


If you can get people to talk, even if it’s just answering questions, eventually they’ll become more comfortable with speaking and may even be encouraged to speak at a future meetup


The way you present or comment on a tool/plugin should not reflect on how you view the user.  Don’t make it sound like you’re the only one who is smart because you use “X” plugin instead of “Y” plugin. Share pro/cons and thoughts without being judgy! Try to be host/plugin agnostic as a leader of a meetup. Our job as facilitators is to create a psychologically safe place.


Be careful with gender-specific meetups - be gender-inclusive, not exclusive. You can focus your content and style at women, but you shouldn’t exclude men from attending. We can all learn from each other - men and women do things differently but all have something to offer.


We have a lot of seasoned WordPress professionals who no longer want to attend meetups because it’s too basic for them. We also have very new beginners who feel it’s too advanced. It’s nice, when possible, to be able to mix your content or have different meetups aimed at different levels.


RELATED: EP283 – Who are we presenting to at a WordCamp or WordPress Meetup? https://www.wpwatercooler.com/video/ep283-wpwatercooler/


If we approach any group of people and think “there’s nothing I can learn from any of these people” then we’re looking at it all wrong. There’s always something to be gained from networking and mentoring with other people. We want to get bigger jobs, so we should partner up with each other!


We’re more than just what we do for a living - we have unique interests/skills outside of WordPress - like yoga!


When Matt Cromwell went to WP Las Vegas a few years ago, he went to a beginner’s workshop (even though he’s an advanced user) and got to hear so much for new users that he was then able to take back with him and say “I’m going to do this differently from now on”.


We go through phases where we are advanced at some things and beginners at other things. It’s important to be a lifelong learner, there’s always something new you can learn and people you can learn from.


Try not to always talk about only the commercial plugin options and the pricier hosting options, you have to remember sometimes your audience is Joe, the cat-blogger! Not everyone works for a WordPress agency!


Promoting and blogging about your meetup is really important. Even over the holidays - that is often when people are the loneliest and need connection with others the most.  Try to promote at least 2 weeks out and use more than just meetup.com to advertise.


Taking photos during your events can be super helpful - especially if you use those photos to promote the group on social media in between events


If you’re going to have your meetup on a week night, it can be tricky for people to get dinner before your meeting, so maybe provide cheap eats (pizza, etc) or try to meet up beforehand for a quick bite together.


In your meetup event page, comment & reply to people when they say they can’t attend or when they give feedback on the meeting - be interactive!


If you have a facebook page, try to schedule facebook events as reminders, and if it’s possible, even have someone record it and share it via facebook live during the meetup. (Can even be done with a cellphone)


Andrea Middleton: WordCamps are a celebration of the meetups that happen the whole year before!


Try not to have all of the meetup/WordCamp organizers sit together at events, it can be intimidating and exclusionary - it also makes it harder to focus on meeting new members and getting to know each other better.


Try to do your staff/organizer meetups not at the meetup event. Schedule a separate time for it.


Have consistency - it’s a HUGE factor - people who don’t attend regularly but know your schedule are able to hop in down the road when they may have more time to attend


Being a community means investing your time in other people. ~ Bridget


TOOLS AND TIPS

Bridget: Use Gmail to help clean-up your constant contact email list by searching gmail addresses to find out if they have a profile with their first and last name listed


Jason: There isn’t really any good formatting for doing “stories” on social media - found a great app for phones that allows you to make and customize your story - Unfold

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/unfold-create-stories/id1247275033?mt=8

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.moonlab.unfold&hl=en_US






Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade @HeySherie

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP108 - Marketing Your WordPress Business with Loss Leaders]]> Thu, 26 Jul 2018 15:53:27 GMT 1:02:05 5b6b1272b794d5666cd1343c no full 108 This week, Jason and Bridget are joined by James Laws from Saturday Drive. He's also the co-host of the Adventures in Businessing podcast. We'll be discussing free work, loss leaders, and freemium price models in the WordPress ecosystem.

 

]]>
This week, Jason and Bridget are joined by James Laws from Saturday Drive. He's also the co-host of the Adventures in Businessing podcast. We'll be discussing free work, loss leaders, and freemium price models in the WordPress ecosystem.

 

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab Quickie 107 - Marketing of Jetpack]]> Wed, 18 Jul 2018 06:30:57 GMT 24:00 5b4edea1948a24a87db08112 no full 107

In this episode, Jason and Bridget discuss the partnership with Jetpack and A2 Hosting and how it impacts the WordPress space. Who benefits and why. Marketing to agencies or end users? Who is the audience and what does Automattic and A2 Hosting have to gain?

Jetpack announces strategic partnership with A2 Hosting - bizjournals.com - Partnership will allow A2 Hosting customers to use Jetpack Personal at no additional cost

DreamHost to include Jetpack Professional with Advanced DreamPress Packages - globenewswire.com

WPWebHost to Include Jetpack Premium with its Managed WordPress Hosting - prweb.com

Recommended WordPress and Jetpack Hosting Providers - jetpack.com

Check the comments on Bridget's post on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/bridget.willard/posts/10156775585801614

]]>

In this episode, Jason and Bridget discuss the partnership with Jetpack and A2 Hosting and how it impacts the WordPress space. Who benefits and why. Marketing to agencies or end users? Who is the audience and what does Automattic and A2 Hosting have to gain?

Jetpack announces strategic partnership with A2 Hosting - bizjournals.com - Partnership will allow A2 Hosting customers to use Jetpack Personal at no additional cost

DreamHost to include Jetpack Professional with Advanced DreamPress Packages - globenewswire.com

WPWebHost to Include Jetpack Premium with its Managed WordPress Hosting - prweb.com

Recommended WordPress and Jetpack Hosting Providers - jetpack.com

Check the comments on Bridget's post on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/bridget.willard/posts/10156775585801614

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP106 - Marketing Hosting Services to a Savvy Audience w/ Joshua Knapp]]> Fri, 06 Jul 2018 06:25:26 GMT 1:00:20 5b4eddf3948a24a87db08111 no full 106

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Joshua Knapp of AnHonestHost. He’ll be talking about ways to gain and retain a customer base by offering services that improve their workflow.

]]>

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Joshua Knapp of AnHonestHost. He’ll be talking about ways to gain and retain a customer base by offering services that improve their workflow.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP105 - Branding Implications of Acquisitions]]> Fri, 29 Jun 2018 05:41:23 GMT 59:55 5b4ed37ee06f5c886731b636 no full 105

https://prospress.com/automatewoo-joins-prospress/

Genesis and Gutenberg:

https://www.billerickson.net/getting-your-theme-ready-for-gutenberg/

The Top 10 Companies Contributing to Open Source (Microsoft at the top there 

]]>

https://prospress.com/automatewoo-joins-prospress/

Genesis and Gutenberg:

https://www.billerickson.net/getting-your-theme-ready-for-gutenberg/

The Top 10 Companies Contributing to Open Source (Microsoft at the top there 

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP104 – Planning & Maintaining a Flexible Content Calendar w/ Laura Coronado]]> Mon, 18 Jun 2018 23:23:35 GMT 58:51 no full 104 This week on WPblab we have Laura Coronado the Communications Specialist at WebDevStudios. Russell Aaron and Jason Tucker will be talking with Laura about some techniques for starting and maintaining an editorial calendar, plotting your posts and allowing yourself to be flexible in order to remain timely. If you or your staff haven't created an editorial calendar yet now is your chance to get yourself educated on it, use the social link here to share this content with your coworkers and friends on social media.

Laura Coronado is the Communications Specialist at WebDev Studios (which is over several other brands). She manages content and social media for 4 brands in total. She has been using WordPress for over a decade.

Laura uses a spreadsheet to help with planning & keeping everything organized. She always has pen and paper handy (Bridget uses a notebook to plan out her content).

  • On her own blog, Laura doesn’t have an editorial calendar at all
  • It depends highly on your own goals and plans – WebDev does have a calendar
  • She likes spreadsheets because they are simple and there is transparency – no buffer between her and everyone else at the company

Plugins:

  1. Editorial Calendar – can manage multiple authors, accessible from WordPress dashboard, drag & drop capability, can schedule & edit schedule, shows you visually where things are in the calendar – highly recommended
  2. CoSchedule – Premium plugin, all the way up to enterprise level – has all the bells and whistles

Can also use Hootsuite for light scheduling and planning/tracking of posts.

Russell – “I don’t have a filter! And usually it’s not grammatically correct.”

He doesn’t use a schedule, it’s more stream of consciousness. He thinks it and just has to get it out on the blog. He voice blogs.

Laura doesn’t like to rock the boat and prefers to do what is easiest for the people she works with. She’s just grateful that their people are willing to write for the blog & will happily take the blog articles in whatever format they come – google doc, pen & paper, word doc, etc.

Hot Tip: There is more than just paragraphs. Bullet points / numbered lists / headlines and subheadings are great. Don’t be afraid to format!

Russell uses his headphones to record and utilizes Google Keep to store his content. Every 4 sentences he’ll skip a line to break up his paragraphs. His articles focus on two things: what is the problem & what is the solution?

On the WebDev calendar they have the due date and the publication date. For her, the due date is usually 24 hours before publication. It gives her time to work on it, proofing/editing, etc. She usually receives the blog post on the exact due date.

Russell works support and never knows what’s going to come in on a given day, so sometimes his blog posts will arrive at the very last minute (or rarely, he misses the deadline). This is why editorial calendars need to have some flexibility.

She recommends having a strategy for when blog posts don’t come in on time. Maybe going to WordPress.tv and finding a great talk to highlight.

What’s good about video is that video takes time to watch which means more time on the site and great engagement!

Jason loves that with us (Sherie & Cheryl) recording the show notes, we’re creating extra content that can be used on social media and on the site. The more content you have the better!

One of the things you need to figure out from the beginning (and keep analyzing) is how often you want to blog. Then establish the best days and times to blog. Then you can start planning your calendar. She only plans out about 2 months in advance to make sure to keep things flexible! There’s always going to be timely/seasonal topics that you want to touch on, so it’s important to have room in the schedule for that.

When you are planning out far in advance, choosing “evergreen” content means that it can be pushed to another date if you have something timely or significant that comes up and needs to be posted first. Such as when Ben came to her and said we really need to address GDPR and should probably get it posted in the next few days.

Laura does not (yet) have a disaster plan, so it can be a bit worrisome wondering what would happen if she was available. It’s probably something that should be written down (style guides, guidelines, etc.) so that others can jump in when needed.

She also thinks that WebDev (and any company really) could really use a Style Guide. How you format your text, how and what you post. That way if someone takes over for you, the tone doesn’t have to change.

She loves using Buffer for social media. She has that and the WebDev site all day long so she can monitor and make sure things are going out when they are supposed to.

You need to keep on top of things and keep the site and plugins up-to-date – if the site goes down, so does your ability to create and share content.

Bridget always recommends not to automate the entire process when posting to social media – inevitably, things will break – there are lots of moving parts to keep track of, and chances are something will get missed.

Sharing posts across multiple platforms can be iffy. If you daisy-chain them, chances are your content is going to look horrible on at least one of the platforms. Try to use an app that will let you post the same content directly to each platform instead of sharing from one platform to the other.

Using Rebrandly to create their shortlinks. WDS.AF

Russell uses a plugin called InstaGo to redirect traffic

What is the payoff for WDS? In the end, the editorial calendar & content strategy is designed to support their marketing strategy, which in the end, supports their business goals.

They have found that their old blog posts were very technically oriented, which is a great audience, but they’re not the decision makers. Who they really want to talk to is the marketing & business executives. They have to decide if their old posts are worth re-posting and if they will reach the right audience.

They’ve identified 3 older blog posts that could be updated and need to decide if it’s worth the time to update them and re-present them or if it’s not worth the time sink.

If something lives on the internet (like a blog post), it’s important to make sure it’s kept up to date, especially in regards to rates/fees for services your company offers. Sometimes it’s better to choose to delete old content instead of refurbishing it. Russell worked for a financial company and had a post with rates in it – set up a plugin to scrape the current rates so he would never have to worry about updating it but it would still be current.

If you decide not to update an out-of-date post and delete it instead, how do you handle the dead link? Laura suggests redirection to something that is more relevant or current.

WebDevStudios is communicating all the time so they work hard to keep things interesting. Sometimes they include contests, and hidden ‘easter eggs’ but all of this takes planning.

Tools and tips of the week:

  1. Laura – Loves to use Grammarly, but it does have some conflicts with WordPress – it will make you a better writer
  2. Jason – Ginger – it’s a chrome extension that helps with proofreading & Grammar.
  3. Russell – Composer – it goes into all the dev projects and pull all the necessary files for each person

Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP104 – Planning & Maintaining a Flexible Content Calendar w/ Laura Coronado appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
This week on WPblab we have Laura Coronado the Communications Specialist at WebDevStudios. Russell Aaron and Jason Tucker will be talking with Laura about some techniques for starting and maintaining an editorial calendar, plotting your posts and allowing yourself to be flexible in order to remain timely. If you or your staff haven't created an editorial calendar yet now is your chance to get yourself educated on it, use the social link here to share this content with your coworkers and friends on social media.

Laura Coronado is the Communications Specialist at WebDev Studios (which is over several other brands). She manages content and social media for 4 brands in total. She has been using WordPress for over a decade.

Laura uses a spreadsheet to help with planning & keeping everything organized. She always has pen and paper handy (Bridget uses a notebook to plan out her content).

  • On her own blog, Laura doesn’t have an editorial calendar at all
  • It depends highly on your own goals and plans – WebDev does have a calendar
  • She likes spreadsheets because they are simple and there is transparency – no buffer between her and everyone else at the company

Plugins:

  1. Editorial Calendar – can manage multiple authors, accessible from WordPress dashboard, drag & drop capability, can schedule & edit schedule, shows you visually where things are in the calendar – highly recommended
  2. CoSchedule – Premium plugin, all the way up to enterprise level – has all the bells and whistles

Can also use Hootsuite for light scheduling and planning/tracking of posts.

Russell – “I don’t have a filter! And usually it’s not grammatically correct.”

He doesn’t use a schedule, it’s more stream of consciousness. He thinks it and just has to get it out on the blog. He voice blogs.

Laura doesn’t like to rock the boat and prefers to do what is easiest for the people she works with. She’s just grateful that their people are willing to write for the blog & will happily take the blog articles in whatever format they come – google doc, pen & paper, word doc, etc.

Hot Tip: There is more than just paragraphs. Bullet points / numbered lists / headlines and subheadings are great. Don’t be afraid to format!

Russell uses his headphones to record and utilizes Google Keep to store his content. Every 4 sentences he’ll skip a line to break up his paragraphs. His articles focus on two things: what is the problem & what is the solution?

On the WebDev calendar they have the due date and the publication date. For her, the due date is usually 24 hours before publication. It gives her time to work on it, proofing/editing, etc. She usually receives the blog post on the exact due date.

Russell works support and never knows what’s going to come in on a given day, so sometimes his blog posts will arrive at the very last minute (or rarely, he misses the deadline). This is why editorial calendars need to have some flexibility.

She recommends having a strategy for when blog posts don’t come in on time. Maybe going to WordPress.tv and finding a great talk to highlight.

What’s good about video is that video takes time to watch which means more time on the site and great engagement!

Jason loves that with us (Sherie & Cheryl) recording the show notes, we’re creating extra content that can be used on social media and on the site. The more content you have the better!

One of the things you need to figure out from the beginning (and keep analyzing) is how often you want to blog. Then establish the best days and times to blog. Then you can start planning your calendar. She only plans out about 2 months in advance to make sure to keep things flexible! There’s always going to be timely/seasonal topics that you want to touch on, so it’s important to have room in the schedule for that.

When you are planning out far in advance, choosing “evergreen” content means that it can be pushed to another date if you have something timely or significant that comes up and needs to be posted first. Such as when Ben came to her and said we really need to address GDPR and should probably get it posted in the next few days.

Laura does not (yet) have a disaster plan, so it can be a bit worrisome wondering what would happen if she was available. It’s probably something that should be written down (style guides, guidelines, etc.) so that others can jump in when needed.

She also thinks that WebDev (and any company really) could really use a Style Guide. How you format your text, how and what you post. That way if someone takes over for you, the tone doesn’t have to change.

She loves using Buffer for social media. She has that and the WebDev site all day long so she can monitor and make sure things are going out when they are supposed to.

You need to keep on top of things and keep the site and plugins up-to-date – if the site goes down, so does your ability to create and share content.

Bridget always recommends not to automate the entire process when posting to social media – inevitably, things will break – there are lots of moving parts to keep track of, and chances are something will get missed.

Sharing posts across multiple platforms can be iffy. If you daisy-chain them, chances are your content is going to look horrible on at least one of the platforms. Try to use an app that will let you post the same content directly to each platform instead of sharing from one platform to the other.

Using Rebrandly to create their shortlinks. WDS.AF

Russell uses a plugin called InstaGo to redirect traffic

What is the payoff for WDS? In the end, the editorial calendar & content strategy is designed to support their marketing strategy, which in the end, supports their business goals.

They have found that their old blog posts were very technically oriented, which is a great audience, but they’re not the decision makers. Who they really want to talk to is the marketing & business executives. They have to decide if their old posts are worth re-posting and if they will reach the right audience.

They’ve identified 3 older blog posts that could be updated and need to decide if it’s worth the time to update them and re-present them or if it’s not worth the time sink.

If something lives on the internet (like a blog post), it’s important to make sure it’s kept up to date, especially in regards to rates/fees for services your company offers. Sometimes it’s better to choose to delete old content instead of refurbishing it. Russell worked for a financial company and had a post with rates in it – set up a plugin to scrape the current rates so he would never have to worry about updating it but it would still be current.

If you decide not to update an out-of-date post and delete it instead, how do you handle the dead link? Laura suggests redirection to something that is more relevant or current.

WebDevStudios is communicating all the time so they work hard to keep things interesting. Sometimes they include contests, and hidden ‘easter eggs’ but all of this takes planning.

Tools and tips of the week:

  1. Laura – Loves to use Grammarly, but it does have some conflicts with WordPress – it will make you a better writer
  2. Jason – Ginger – it’s a chrome extension that helps with proofreading & Grammar.
  3. Russell – Composer – it goes into all the dev projects and pull all the necessary files for each person

Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP104 – Planning & Maintaining a Flexible Content Calendar w/ Laura Coronado appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP103 – Bootstrap to Commonplace: Talking Branding & Grass Roots w/ Marc Benzakein]]> Wed, 06 Jun 2018 20:38:17 GMT 55:55 no

Everyone knows DesktopServer. But it wasn't magic. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Marc Benzakein. He'll talk about how DesktopServer went from a development project to a common and popular workflow solution. Join in the live chat to ask questions.

Interested in getting your product or service in front of our viewers and listeners? Check out how to sponsor an episode of one of our shows.

 

  • Gregg Franklin – handles 90% of the customer service because he’s so good with people
  • David Jesch
  • Stephen Carnam

 

Branding is something you have to do for yourself personally as well as the company you are with – Marc has been told he’s the face of ServerPress because he’s gone to so many WordCamps, but he also has his own “brand”

 

You want to know who these people are, you want to know that they’re people of integrity and you want to know what their mission is

 

Marc has known Gregg since 1989 – they both worked in the video department at Circuit City!  

 

Gregg always made sure to be very knowledgeable about the products and he was very good with the customers, but he was also very competitive!

 

If an agency’s specialty is WordPress, it makes sense to go to WordCamps – the first year Marc was involved with ServerPress, he did 26 WordCamps (2014), basically one every other weekend! Kept up a similar pace the next few years.

 

Marc went to WordCamp San Diego before he even became involved with ServerPress and that’s when he first fell in love with the WordPress community. Phoenix was the first WordCamp that he spoke at.

 

Other than Southern California, ServerPress’ footprint was very small at that time.  When he went to speak at Phoenix, he gave a talk/workshop that was 2 hours. There were about 100 people in the room and it went without a hitch! Marc had planned for almost every contingency, but nothing happened.  Phoenix was bigger than WordCamp Miami at the time so he knew he had to be on his game!

 

They were a bootstrap company with not a lot of capital.  How do they get their name out there?

Branding is more important than “marketing” at that level. “You get to control your marketing, but people control your brand. They get to decide what they think of you whether you like it or not.”

 

What did they want people to think about ServerPress:

  1. We’re at every single WordCamp
  2. We’re an established company in the community

 

They decided to provide lanyards with their name and logo on it and the WordCamp’s logo on the other side – but after about a year were asked to stop doing that – he knew when they did it the first time, they might eventually be told to stop! (reminiscent of what happened with Pantheon branding the hotel elevators at WCUS 2016)  Andrea Middleton (from the WordPress Community team) called him (and was SO nice), and politely encouraged them to stop, which they agreed.

 

Jason: you should provide power strips in the rooms with your logo on them! People would LOVE you!

Marc: better idea – take your sponsor table and just fill it with power strips. People would hang out there all day long!

 

Bridget: almost all businesses in the WordPress spectrum are self-made, small businesses. But they are the ones that are sponsoring the local community, the meetups – they are making an investment in the people which keeps them in the WordPress ecosystem.  

 

This is why one of Bridget & Jason’s main goals with this show is to give people actionable ideas to improve their marketing and learn how to reach their audience better

 

The question you have to ask yourself is: What is our return on investment?  It’s not a concrete, easy number when you are involved in WordCamps. Money/profit is the scorecard that most people look to.  But for small businesses in the WordPress ecosystem, the people, the loyalty and community that you gain are the ROI. They will sell your product without you asking them to do it – you are providing something that is so valuable to them that they have to preach it from the mountaintops – you are giving them so much more value than they expected.

 

Marc started programming on a mainframe computer at the age of 10, – he’s smart but he feels lucky that he gets to work with 2 of the smartest people he knows representing a great product!

 

2017 was a tough year for DesktopServer – Apple had more security updates than ever, Microsoft had more security updates than ever and they had to react to all of it. Also, PHP7 came and they had to react to that as well. It was a perfect storm – a year of being reactive rather than proactive. It was because of their branding and the loyalty that they built up among their customers, that people were willing to give them grace and work with them during that time.

 

What can we do to make our customers feel like they are getting the value for what they are spending?

 

They appreciate that they have such a loyal following and fanbase. Bridget: you can either make your influencers or find your influencers and ServerPress “made” their influencers.

 

Marc has never had a partnership like this one.  They have a deep respect for each other. It might be fate … it just worked out! There needs to be some overlap between the roles, but not so much that everyone is stepping on each other’s toes.  

 

Marc handles operations, business development, billing, marketing, etc.  Gregg handles customer service and people. Dave/Steve speak their own language and understand each other.  They make sure not to step on each other’s toes. They all have their jobs pretty well defined and nobody wants to take over anyone else’s!

 

It’s all a matter of having a healthy amount of respect for each other and boundaries. Within the company, Marc has the nickname of “The Mayor”. There have been times that they’ve all talked about the direction that the company should go and it often came down, in the end, to “What does Marc think?”, but everything at ServerPress is really a consensus. Everyone has a say. They have disagreements, but they end up with a better end-product as a result. They don’t let their egos get in the way of building a better product and building a better company.

 

What you see is what you get with them.  They are exactly who you see on a weekend at a WordCamp and during the week at ServerPress. People don’t care how big a company is, they want to have some sort of personal connection to the company. This is why they go to so many WordCamps – they want to have that same connection to their customers.

 

If I treat people with respect and honesty, I can be the same person inside my company and outside, personally.

Tip of the Week

Marc

New plugin for ServerPress that automatically backs up your database

Google Photos – https://photos.google.com/

 

Bridget

Revive Old Posts plugin – bring up older content from your blogs and recycle it – great for sharing evergreen posts, lots of custom settings

 

Jason

https://agenda.com/ – Note-taking app that ties into your calendar – you can write notes about specific events that you are attending. Supports markdown.

https://developer.apple.com/design/awards/

https://overcast.fm/+K8lgFR3dk Rene Ritchie and Serenity Caldwell speak with the creators of Agenda — a WWDC 2018 Apple Design Award winning note taking app for Mac. They discuss Agenda as well as this year’s major announcements from a developer and end user perspective.

 


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP103 – Bootstrap to Commonplace: Talking Branding & Grass Roots w/ Marc Benzakein appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Everyone knows DesktopServer. But it wasn't magic. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Marc Benzakein. He'll talk about how DesktopServer went from a development project to a common and popular workflow solution. Join in the live chat to ask questions.

Interested in getting your product or service in front of our viewers and listeners? Check out how to sponsor an episode of one of our shows.

 

  • Gregg Franklin – handles 90% of the customer service because he’s so good with people
  • David Jesch
  • Stephen Carnam

 

Branding is something you have to do for yourself personally as well as the company you are with – Marc has been told he’s the face of ServerPress because he’s gone to so many WordCamps, but he also has his own “brand”

 

You want to know who these people are, you want to know that they’re people of integrity and you want to know what their mission is

 

Marc has known Gregg since 1989 – they both worked in the video department at Circuit City!  

 

Gregg always made sure to be very knowledgeable about the products and he was very good with the customers, but he was also very competitive!

 

If an agency’s specialty is WordPress, it makes sense to go to WordCamps – the first year Marc was involved with ServerPress, he did 26 WordCamps (2014), basically one every other weekend! Kept up a similar pace the next few years.

 

Marc went to WordCamp San Diego before he even became involved with ServerPress and that’s when he first fell in love with the WordPress community. Phoenix was the first WordCamp that he spoke at.

 

Other than Southern California, ServerPress’ footprint was very small at that time.  When he went to speak at Phoenix, he gave a talk/workshop that was 2 hours. There were about 100 people in the room and it went without a hitch! Marc had planned for almost every contingency, but nothing happened.  Phoenix was bigger than WordCamp Miami at the time so he knew he had to be on his game!

 

They were a bootstrap company with not a lot of capital.  How do they get their name out there?

Branding is more important than “marketing” at that level. “You get to control your marketing, but people control your brand. They get to decide what they think of you whether you like it or not.”

 

What did they want people to think about ServerPress:

  1. We’re at every single WordCamp
  2. We’re an established company in the community

 

They decided to provide lanyards with their name and logo on it and the WordCamp’s logo on the other side – but after about a year were asked to stop doing that – he knew when they did it the first time, they might eventually be told to stop! (reminiscent of what happened with Pantheon branding the hotel elevators at WCUS 2016)  Andrea Middleton (from the WordPress Community team) called him (and was SO nice), and politely encouraged them to stop, which they agreed.

 

Jason: you should provide power strips in the rooms with your logo on them! People would LOVE you!

Marc: better idea – take your sponsor table and just fill it with power strips. People would hang out there all day long!

 

Bridget: almost all businesses in the WordPress spectrum are self-made, small businesses. But they are the ones that are sponsoring the local community, the meetups – they are making an investment in the people which keeps them in the WordPress ecosystem.  

 

This is why one of Bridget & Jason’s main goals with this show is to give people actionable ideas to improve their marketing and learn how to reach their audience better

 

The question you have to ask yourself is: What is our return on investment?  It’s not a concrete, easy number when you are involved in WordCamps. Money/profit is the scorecard that most people look to.  But for small businesses in the WordPress ecosystem, the people, the loyalty and community that you gain are the ROI. They will sell your product without you asking them to do it – you are providing something that is so valuable to them that they have to preach it from the mountaintops – you are giving them so much more value than they expected.

 

Marc started programming on a mainframe computer at the age of 10, – he’s smart but he feels lucky that he gets to work with 2 of the smartest people he knows representing a great product!

 

2017 was a tough year for DesktopServer – Apple had more security updates than ever, Microsoft had more security updates than ever and they had to react to all of it. Also, PHP7 came and they had to react to that as well. It was a perfect storm – a year of being reactive rather than proactive. It was because of their branding and the loyalty that they built up among their customers, that people were willing to give them grace and work with them during that time.

 

What can we do to make our customers feel like they are getting the value for what they are spending?

 

They appreciate that they have such a loyal following and fanbase. Bridget: you can either make your influencers or find your influencers and ServerPress “made” their influencers.

 

Marc has never had a partnership like this one.  They have a deep respect for each other. It might be fate … it just worked out! There needs to be some overlap between the roles, but not so much that everyone is stepping on each other’s toes.  

 

Marc handles operations, business development, billing, marketing, etc.  Gregg handles customer service and people. Dave/Steve speak their own language and understand each other.  They make sure not to step on each other’s toes. They all have their jobs pretty well defined and nobody wants to take over anyone else’s!

 

It’s all a matter of having a healthy amount of respect for each other and boundaries. Within the company, Marc has the nickname of “The Mayor”. There have been times that they’ve all talked about the direction that the company should go and it often came down, in the end, to “What does Marc think?”, but everything at ServerPress is really a consensus. Everyone has a say. They have disagreements, but they end up with a better end-product as a result. They don’t let their egos get in the way of building a better product and building a better company.

 

What you see is what you get with them.  They are exactly who you see on a weekend at a WordCamp and during the week at ServerPress. People don’t care how big a company is, they want to have some sort of personal connection to the company. This is why they go to so many WordCamps – they want to have that same connection to their customers.

 

If I treat people with respect and honesty, I can be the same person inside my company and outside, personally.

Tip of the Week

Marc

New plugin for ServerPress that automatically backs up your database

Google Photos – https://photos.google.com/

 

Bridget

Revive Old Posts plugin – bring up older content from your blogs and recycle it – great for sharing evergreen posts, lots of custom settings

 

Jason

https://agenda.com/ – Note-taking app that ties into your calendar – you can write notes about specific events that you are attending. Supports markdown.

https://developer.apple.com/design/awards/

https://overcast.fm/+K8lgFR3dk Rene Ritchie and Serenity Caldwell speak with the creators of Agenda — a WWDC 2018 Apple Design Award winning note taking app for Mac. They discuss Agenda as well as this year’s major announcements from a developer and end user perspective.

 


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP103 – Bootstrap to Commonplace: Talking Branding & Grass Roots w/ Marc Benzakein appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP102 – LinkedIn: Why WordPressers Shouldn’t Ignore it]]> Mon, 21 May 2018 15:40:38 GMT 58:44 no

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Marcy Massura, who has an extensive background in marketing, to say the least. We're going to apply marketing principles from other industries to WordPress freelancers and agencies and give you all good reasons to use this neglected social network.

You can find Marcy on the following sites:

Marcy Massura & Company
twitter.com – @marcymassura
linkedin.com – marcymassura
instagram.com – @marcymassura

Bridget Willard – https://www.linkedin.com/in/bridgetwillard/
Jason Tucker – https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasontucker/
Marcy Massura – https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcymassura/

Linkedin is more help focused and is more self-regulating than other social platforms.

LinkedIn self-polices its groups.

Have a ‘real’ photo for LinkedIn profile photo – how people would see you in real life.

^ Focus on your face and eyes

Your header image is very important.

Header image should communicate what you do

A safe place to promote what you do, You can brag about your accomplishments

Premium LinkedIn allows to better hunt for a job or looking for people to fit a specific role or job. https://www.linkedin.com/profinder

Small biz helping other small biz find right connections.

LinkedIn ads result in actual results, continues to improve all the time.

Linkedin offers all types of advertising and is very open-minded with it comes to ads.

Job titles are great but think about how someone would be searching for the type of job you want to be hired for.

Have fun with your personal tagline, not so much your titles. Have fun with the tagline but do not forget the keywords.

LinkedIn is 15 years old the – same age as WordPress

LI is more than a resume receptacle

Nice way to get more recommendations is to add a note on the bottom of all invoices.

Also, Linkedin is one of the only social network platforms that you want to be friends with your clients.

Connect with New clients on LinkedIn, great way to ask for recommendations AFTER a job well done.

Don’t fake your reviews, make them count.

There is a toggle on your profile that lets you notify everyone or not of changes.

Cool stuff on LinkedIn:
Can follow hashtags to have it show in the feed

Its kinda like a think tank. People seem to be so willing to help. However, this is based on your connections.

Tip of the Week

Marcy
Sprout Social – Social media management made easy.
– 99/month to start
^ it’s no hootsuite or hexagon, but great for small business and reviewing reports on social interactions.

Bridget
How Adam Smith can change your life]
Goes good with tequila

Jason
Rescue Time – tracks time spent doing tasks on your computer
automatic and IFTT reports to rescuetime when Jason is Lyfting about.

______________
Show notes contributed by:

James Tryon – @jamestryon
Paul Oyler – @PappyOyler

The post WPblab EP102 – LinkedIn: Why WordPressers Shouldn't Ignore it appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Marcy Massura, who has an extensive background in marketing, to say the least. We're going to apply marketing principles from other industries to WordPress freelancers and agencies and give you all good reasons to use this neglected social network.

You can find Marcy on the following sites:

Marcy Massura & Company
twitter.com – @marcymassura
linkedin.com – marcymassura
instagram.com – @marcymassura

Bridget Willard – https://www.linkedin.com/in/bridgetwillard/
Jason Tucker – https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasontucker/
Marcy Massura – https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcymassura/

Linkedin is more help focused and is more self-regulating than other social platforms.

LinkedIn self-polices its groups.

Have a ‘real’ photo for LinkedIn profile photo – how people would see you in real life.

^ Focus on your face and eyes

Your header image is very important.

Header image should communicate what you do

A safe place to promote what you do, You can brag about your accomplishments

Premium LinkedIn allows to better hunt for a job or looking for people to fit a specific role or job. https://www.linkedin.com/profinder

Small biz helping other small biz find right connections.

LinkedIn ads result in actual results, continues to improve all the time.

Linkedin offers all types of advertising and is very open-minded with it comes to ads.

Job titles are great but think about how someone would be searching for the type of job you want to be hired for.

Have fun with your personal tagline, not so much your titles. Have fun with the tagline but do not forget the keywords.

LinkedIn is 15 years old the – same age as WordPress

LI is more than a resume receptacle

Nice way to get more recommendations is to add a note on the bottom of all invoices.

Also, Linkedin is one of the only social network platforms that you want to be friends with your clients.

Connect with New clients on LinkedIn, great way to ask for recommendations AFTER a job well done.

Don’t fake your reviews, make them count.

There is a toggle on your profile that lets you notify everyone or not of changes.

Cool stuff on LinkedIn:
Can follow hashtags to have it show in the feed

Its kinda like a think tank. People seem to be so willing to help. However, this is based on your connections.

Tip of the Week

Marcy
Sprout Social – Social media management made easy.
– 99/month to start
^ it’s no hootsuite or hexagon, but great for small business and reviewing reports on social interactions.

Bridget
How Adam Smith can change your life]
Goes good with tequila

Jason
Rescue Time – tracks time spent doing tasks on your computer
automatic and IFTT reports to rescuetime when Jason is Lyfting about.

______________
Show notes contributed by:

James Tryon – @jamestryon
Paul Oyler – @PappyOyler

The post WPblab EP102 – LinkedIn: Why WordPressers Shouldn't Ignore it appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP101 – It’s okay to have a personality in your marketing with Rick Solari]]> Thu, 17 May 2018 20:57:34 GMT 1:01:25 no

In this episode, Bridget and Jason are joined by Rick Solari. Bland branding is bad branding. Allow your personality to shine. Let’s chat about taking a different approach than the norm.

Bridget: Don’t be so stuck on your business model that you’re not willing to ‘shift’!

Rick: Media Producer and consultant – helps people spice things up in their brand awareness, social media, videos, etc – teach how to share your true voice and gain more followers along the way!

There’s a lot of people out there who continuously post the same things – very familiar/similar to others in their industry. Rick teaches people to go ‘outside of the box’ and add fun & personality to their marketing efforts.

Find your voice and just speak it – scream it as loud as you can!

Bridget – I always default to “as polite as possible”

Humor is really tricky in this post-modern world – “skin is so thin, it’s a wonder most people don’t have skin cancer”

Pushing boundaries can get you attention but you want to make sure it’s the right kind of attention.  Make sure it doesn’t backfire on you.

Be careful with hashtags and social media campaigns, you have to be prepared for the hecklers.

It’s one thing to get people to talk about you and your brand, but are you getting them to talk about you and behave or ‘take action’ in the way that you want them to?

Bridget: You really have to know your audience.  The danger is that you are being a source of entertainment but there is no benefit coming your way.

If what is happening or is popular/trending in social media makes sense for your brand, jump on that!

Being funny can be really good – it’s not necessarily a bad thing

Torque and ‘Doc Pop’ do a great job with their videos and cartoons

https://torquemag.io/author/doc-pop/

Bridget: One of the reasons I like humor is that it can be a gentler way to communicate a truth.

BrunchBros  – Brunch is a big thing in Miami, FL! They have various different characters like the “business bro” and the “frat bro” and they post memes based around those characters – adds humor and wit to the more typical “food blog” style posts

Bridget: contemplating writing backstories for stock photos!  She loves making up stories about random people at restaurants, public events, etc.  It might be a good way of tricking herself into writing again and would be a great way to show her understanding of people!

There’s a game called ‘memes’ that is similar to that idea with storytelling based on a picture

We’re always pushing to do more, be more, learn more. Sometimes it’s nice to just see something cheery on the internet that makes you smile or laugh.  It might even spark creativity in someone else!

There are limits to how far you should take your humor. Create a pros/cons list – what is the worst thing that can happen if I post this? If you think something is funny, you should try to consider what the opposite reaction could be to that content.

Weigh out the pros/cons – even if it’s completely funny to you, work out how it might be received wrongly by someone else and what would happen – work the cons list and make sure you are comfortable with the possible reactions before you post

If you have a team, try to ping-pong your ideas with a group. If not, bounce it off your good friend and see what they think.

If you can figure out how to quickly jump onto & associate your brand with something that is happening (current events) then that can be social media gold – have to make sure it’s not a sensitive issue though

The biggest hangup with companies, especially bigger ones, is the reluctance to give up control

Make sure if you are going to jump on something that’s trending and bounce off of it, that you do it in a timely manner.  Don’t be the cardboard company that wanted to react to an event that happened 6 weeks ago!

Try creating a google search using boolean operators so that it’s very specific, that way when something actually comes up, you know it’s something worth reacting to

Think about how do you take something boring and turn it into something that sticks?

If you’re a bank, for example, what do you talk about? Talk about stuff that is “a win” for your brand or your customer and use that feature to inject a bit of humor into your marketing.

Southwest is one of Bridget’s favorite airlines.  The flight attendants have a lot of autonomy and get to have a lot of fun with what they do.  She mentioned bad turbulence and made a joke about it on social media during a flight and they replied and then DM’d her back and sent her a gift certificate.

Everything you do in social media is a risk.  There will always be some backlash. There will always be critics.  Take the risk but know what kind of backlash you might get. Go in with eyes wide open.

Jason: If you can be timely (but be sensitive not to push it too far) you can pull off a lot of cool things.

Rick: You want to respond within the hour or within the day depending on what it is and the staying power of the trend.

 

Tools/Tips of the Week

Rick: huge fan of Mashable.com – they have a shop, including online courses. There is an instagram marketing crash course for entrepreneurs on a huge sale!

Bridget: Had a revelation that Javascript is Algebra and thought maybe she can teach herself! Started Wes Bos Javascript30 but needed more background to get started. Someone recommended FreeCodeCamp and it is SO cool!  On lesson 22 already! Also set up a CodePen account – wants to prove to herself that she can do it!  “We can do anything we want to do, we just have to put our minds to it”; “Say YES to yourself”

Jason: hates Slack, but if you’re going to use it, you need something that will corral it. Franz – you install it and log into all of the services you use to chat with folks, aggregates all of them into one


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP101 – It’s okay to have a personality in your marketing with Rick Solari appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Bridget and Jason are joined by Rick Solari. Bland branding is bad branding. Allow your personality to shine. Let’s chat about taking a different approach than the norm.

Bridget: Don’t be so stuck on your business model that you’re not willing to ‘shift’!

Rick: Media Producer and consultant – helps people spice things up in their brand awareness, social media, videos, etc – teach how to share your true voice and gain more followers along the way!

There’s a lot of people out there who continuously post the same things – very familiar/similar to others in their industry. Rick teaches people to go ‘outside of the box’ and add fun & personality to their marketing efforts.

Find your voice and just speak it – scream it as loud as you can!

Bridget – I always default to “as polite as possible”

Humor is really tricky in this post-modern world – “skin is so thin, it’s a wonder most people don’t have skin cancer”

Pushing boundaries can get you attention but you want to make sure it’s the right kind of attention.  Make sure it doesn’t backfire on you.

Be careful with hashtags and social media campaigns, you have to be prepared for the hecklers.

It’s one thing to get people to talk about you and your brand, but are you getting them to talk about you and behave or ‘take action’ in the way that you want them to?

Bridget: You really have to know your audience.  The danger is that you are being a source of entertainment but there is no benefit coming your way.

If what is happening or is popular/trending in social media makes sense for your brand, jump on that!

Being funny can be really good – it’s not necessarily a bad thing

Torque and ‘Doc Pop’ do a great job with their videos and cartoons

https://torquemag.io/author/doc-pop/

Bridget: One of the reasons I like humor is that it can be a gentler way to communicate a truth.

BrunchBros  – Brunch is a big thing in Miami, FL! They have various different characters like the “business bro” and the “frat bro” and they post memes based around those characters – adds humor and wit to the more typical “food blog” style posts

Bridget: contemplating writing backstories for stock photos!  She loves making up stories about random people at restaurants, public events, etc.  It might be a good way of tricking herself into writing again and would be a great way to show her understanding of people!

There’s a game called ‘memes’ that is similar to that idea with storytelling based on a picture

We’re always pushing to do more, be more, learn more. Sometimes it’s nice to just see something cheery on the internet that makes you smile or laugh.  It might even spark creativity in someone else!

There are limits to how far you should take your humor. Create a pros/cons list – what is the worst thing that can happen if I post this? If you think something is funny, you should try to consider what the opposite reaction could be to that content.

Weigh out the pros/cons – even if it’s completely funny to you, work out how it might be received wrongly by someone else and what would happen – work the cons list and make sure you are comfortable with the possible reactions before you post

If you have a team, try to ping-pong your ideas with a group. If not, bounce it off your good friend and see what they think.

If you can figure out how to quickly jump onto & associate your brand with something that is happening (current events) then that can be social media gold – have to make sure it’s not a sensitive issue though

The biggest hangup with companies, especially bigger ones, is the reluctance to give up control

Make sure if you are going to jump on something that’s trending and bounce off of it, that you do it in a timely manner.  Don’t be the cardboard company that wanted to react to an event that happened 6 weeks ago!

Try creating a google search using boolean operators so that it’s very specific, that way when something actually comes up, you know it’s something worth reacting to

Think about how do you take something boring and turn it into something that sticks?

If you’re a bank, for example, what do you talk about? Talk about stuff that is “a win” for your brand or your customer and use that feature to inject a bit of humor into your marketing.

Southwest is one of Bridget’s favorite airlines.  The flight attendants have a lot of autonomy and get to have a lot of fun with what they do.  She mentioned bad turbulence and made a joke about it on social media during a flight and they replied and then DM’d her back and sent her a gift certificate.

Everything you do in social media is a risk.  There will always be some backlash. There will always be critics.  Take the risk but know what kind of backlash you might get. Go in with eyes wide open.

Jason: If you can be timely (but be sensitive not to push it too far) you can pull off a lot of cool things.

Rick: You want to respond within the hour or within the day depending on what it is and the staying power of the trend.

 

Tools/Tips of the Week

Rick: huge fan of Mashable.com – they have a shop, including online courses. There is an instagram marketing crash course for entrepreneurs on a huge sale!

Bridget: Had a revelation that Javascript is Algebra and thought maybe she can teach herself! Started Wes Bos Javascript30 but needed more background to get started. Someone recommended FreeCodeCamp and it is SO cool!  On lesson 22 already! Also set up a CodePen account – wants to prove to herself that she can do it!  “We can do anything we want to do, we just have to put our minds to it”; “Say YES to yourself”

Jason: hates Slack, but if you’re going to use it, you need something that will corral it. Franz – you install it and log into all of the services you use to chat with folks, aggregates all of them into one


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP101 – It’s okay to have a personality in your marketing with Rick Solari appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab – 100th Episode Mastermind – Lifelong Learning with Our Community]]> Thu, 26 Apr 2018 20:22:06 GMT 1:08:56 no

On this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard get sentimental and invite past guests to jump on and share what they've learned recently in WordPress. We're all life-long learners. Come join in the fun in the chat and see more details in our Facebook Group.

 

100 Episodes since October 2015!!

  • Bridget Willard
  • Jason Tucker

Bridget: “As we learn and grow and teach, our bio’s change and grow!”

Russell Aaron

  • Has been on WPblab off & on since the beginning and was on nearly weekly in the beginning when it was more of a Q&A show
  • His girlfriend was super supportive of his journey in WordPress and let him spend the time he needed coding and ‘leveling up’ his skills. They now have a little boy, which is also a big learning journey for them!
  • Never thought he could work for a company like WebDev Studios but met the right people and answered the right questions and here he is! Over 2 years with them now!
  • If you are ever having errors, you have 3 options – make a backup and try turning things on and off, have a staging site, and reach out to people you are connected to in the community – lean on other people!
  • WordPress is so cool! Put your heart into it and you’re gonna love it!

 

Kevin Hoffman

  • Kevin remembers WPblab when it was still on the Blab platform!
  • Blab was an interesting beast, you never knew who would pop in! Bridget: it was like Chatroulette!
  • Had to keynote WordCamp Pittsburgh on 2 days notice, so he covered his WordPress journey, which basically all started with WPblab.
  • Decided to try and run his own blab – talked for 30 minutes and no one showed up! Realized that he wasn’t putting things on record – not writing blog posts or sharing his work.  People don’t always operate on your time. I have value to offer but it doesn’t mean the person on the receiving end is ready at that moment. He worked on WordPress for 7 years before he wrote his first blog post!

 

James Tryon

  • Easily Amused, Inc and Wapu.us
  • James has been on & off the show for a long time, helping with show notes too!
  • Bridget: For a long time WPblab was a virtual meetup!  It was a great option for people who had meetups far from them.
  • James looks forward to it every week, it makes his Thursday night! Loves the chatting, and hanging out with everyone!  Even though he’s across the country, it feels like everyone is together on Thursday nights!
  • Jason: it’s so strange because he’ll see people online and through Blab all the time and then see them in person and it will be like they’ve just seen each other, even though they are on opposite coasts – all thanks to WPblab
  • James’ word of wisdom – he has been thoroughly enjoying an hour a day of yard work lately! Exercise and fresh air!
  • He really loved WP Watercooler but WPblab feels like home to him. He looks forward to it every Thursday and feels bad when he has to miss it. We all feel like family!
  • Bridget: “It’s so true! If I have a panic attack while I’m at WCEU, will any of my friends be there?” And so many people jumped up to say they would!

 

Roy Sivan

  • Had him on several WPblab shows in the past & interviewed him several times
  • His favorite memory was getting in a deep conversation with Bridget about open source
  • One thing that impresses Bridget most is that Roy and none of the WP Crowd ever talk down to her about WordPress & her level of knowledge/skills
  • “For every good developer, there is a user to give that developer purpose!”
  • You’re a user and without you, I have no reason to build this thing – but you give us purpose and a reason to create!
  • Bridget: you can have a cognitive dissonance if you aren’t using your product. Even if you knew it once a few years ago, if you haven’t used it since, everything has changed!

 

The whole crew

  • Roy’s shoutout – go over to Matt Cromwell’s twitter to check out a video of trolling Ben
  • Roy – he loved how Jason was always doing tech support with Blab!
  • Bridget – you want Jason to be the “guy” – you certainly don’t want it to be me!
  • Bridget – I don’t build websites, hire Roy!
  • Bridget – just wrote her first WordCamp talk on GitHub with Markdown!
  • All – discuss how much (or if any) company logo can appear on WordCamp talk slides and still be acceptable for WordPress.tv
  • Bridget – WordPress has taught me how to go to bars – true story LOL
  • Bridget – WordPress.TV is the best – free learning! Lynda is great, but WP.tv is free
  • Russell – when I got to WordCamp, I want to learn, I don’t want to be bored!  WordPress.tv – if you ever want to see the energy of the community, that’s the place
  • Russell & Bridget both dream about their WordCamp talks

 

Tools of the week:

  • James: Google Drive is amazing for working as a team – we can all take notes on the same documents and share the same files. We use it all the time, along with Slack.
  • Russell – WP-CLI (command line interface) – if you don’t know what the command line tool is and how amazing it is, go learn about it – it’s the best tool!
  • Kevin: Look into BEM – Block Element Modifier (CSS naming convention)
    https://twitter.com/kevinwhoffman/status/987005921510526976
  • Roy: SVG.js – complex animating with SVGs – really great library with lots of cool plugins – wrote a plugin called the Gutenburg Object Plugin. Takes the data and saves it properly in the database as an array instead of in markup format.
  • Bridget: TouchNote – will send postcards of your photos & even canvas prints Also: STEP program with the State Department – connects you to US Embassy and give them your info for when you are traveling overseas
  • Jason: Markdown editor: https://macdown.uranusjr.com/ – simplest and free – MacDown. It’s 2 panes, type text on one side, renders Markdown on the other side

 

Roy Question for Bridget – where you used to believe Open Source was not a good thing, how do you feel now? – When you have intellectual property and you give it away for free – it is your choice. The thing that’s great about WordPress, it’s not about planned obsolescence.  They don’t create something that will break to create new customers. This is the issue that she has with Gutenberg. WordPress believes that everyone has the right to publish and stands upon the idea that they will never break your site. Gutenberg might break that. What is the best solution for your customer/user?

Bridget:

  • The relationships and people are what makes WordPress valuable.
  • WordPress is at a crossroads, do we want to stay with our core beliefs that it’s all about ‘democratizing publishing’ or do we bow to capitalism?
  • I love WordPress, I love the community and I love the WPblab group even more!!

 

______________
Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

 

The post WPblab – 100th Episode Mastermind – Lifelong Learning with Our Community appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

On this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard get sentimental and invite past guests to jump on and share what they've learned recently in WordPress. We're all life-long learners. Come join in the fun in the chat and see more details in our Facebook Group.

 

100 Episodes since October 2015!!

  • Bridget Willard
  • Jason Tucker

Bridget: “As we learn and grow and teach, our bio’s change and grow!”

Russell Aaron

  • Has been on WPblab off & on since the beginning and was on nearly weekly in the beginning when it was more of a Q&A show
  • His girlfriend was super supportive of his journey in WordPress and let him spend the time he needed coding and ‘leveling up’ his skills. They now have a little boy, which is also a big learning journey for them!
  • Never thought he could work for a company like WebDev Studios but met the right people and answered the right questions and here he is! Over 2 years with them now!
  • If you are ever having errors, you have 3 options – make a backup and try turning things on and off, have a staging site, and reach out to people you are connected to in the community – lean on other people!
  • WordPress is so cool! Put your heart into it and you’re gonna love it!

 

Kevin Hoffman

  • Kevin remembers WPblab when it was still on the Blab platform!
  • Blab was an interesting beast, you never knew who would pop in! Bridget: it was like Chatroulette!
  • Had to keynote WordCamp Pittsburgh on 2 days notice, so he covered his WordPress journey, which basically all started with WPblab.
  • Decided to try and run his own blab – talked for 30 minutes and no one showed up! Realized that he wasn’t putting things on record – not writing blog posts or sharing his work.  People don’t always operate on your time. I have value to offer but it doesn’t mean the person on the receiving end is ready at that moment. He worked on WordPress for 7 years before he wrote his first blog post!

 

James Tryon

  • Easily Amused, Inc and Wapu.us
  • James has been on & off the show for a long time, helping with show notes too!
  • Bridget: For a long time WPblab was a virtual meetup!  It was a great option for people who had meetups far from them.
  • James looks forward to it every week, it makes his Thursday night! Loves the chatting, and hanging out with everyone!  Even though he’s across the country, it feels like everyone is together on Thursday nights!
  • Jason: it’s so strange because he’ll see people online and through Blab all the time and then see them in person and it will be like they’ve just seen each other, even though they are on opposite coasts – all thanks to WPblab
  • James’ word of wisdom – he has been thoroughly enjoying an hour a day of yard work lately! Exercise and fresh air!
  • He really loved WP Watercooler but WPblab feels like home to him. He looks forward to it every Thursday and feels bad when he has to miss it. We all feel like family!
  • Bridget: “It’s so true! If I have a panic attack while I’m at WCEU, will any of my friends be there?” And so many people jumped up to say they would!

 

Roy Sivan

  • Had him on several WPblab shows in the past & interviewed him several times
  • His favorite memory was getting in a deep conversation with Bridget about open source
  • One thing that impresses Bridget most is that Roy and none of the WP Crowd ever talk down to her about WordPress & her level of knowledge/skills
  • “For every good developer, there is a user to give that developer purpose!”
  • You’re a user and without you, I have no reason to build this thing – but you give us purpose and a reason to create!
  • Bridget: you can have a cognitive dissonance if you aren’t using your product. Even if you knew it once a few years ago, if you haven’t used it since, everything has changed!

 

The whole crew

  • Roy’s shoutout – go over to Matt Cromwell’s twitter to check out a video of trolling Ben
  • Roy – he loved how Jason was always doing tech support with Blab!
  • Bridget – you want Jason to be the “guy” – you certainly don’t want it to be me!
  • Bridget – I don’t build websites, hire Roy!
  • Bridget – just wrote her first WordCamp talk on GitHub with Markdown!
  • All – discuss how much (or if any) company logo can appear on WordCamp talk slides and still be acceptable for WordPress.tv
  • Bridget – WordPress has taught me how to go to bars – true story LOL
  • Bridget – WordPress.TV is the best – free learning! Lynda is great, but WP.tv is free
  • Russell – when I got to WordCamp, I want to learn, I don’t want to be bored!  WordPress.tv – if you ever want to see the energy of the community, that’s the place
  • Russell & Bridget both dream about their WordCamp talks

 

Tools of the week:

  • James: Google Drive is amazing for working as a team – we can all take notes on the same documents and share the same files. We use it all the time, along with Slack.
  • Russell – WP-CLI (command line interface) – if you don’t know what the command line tool is and how amazing it is, go learn about it – it’s the best tool!
  • Kevin: Look into BEM – Block Element Modifier (CSS naming convention)
    https://twitter.com/kevinwhoffman/status/987005921510526976
  • Roy: SVG.js – complex animating with SVGs – really great library with lots of cool plugins – wrote a plugin called the Gutenburg Object Plugin. Takes the data and saves it properly in the database as an array instead of in markup format.
  • Bridget: TouchNote – will send postcards of your photos & even canvas prints Also: STEP program with the State Department – connects you to US Embassy and give them your info for when you are traveling overseas
  • Jason: Markdown editor: https://macdown.uranusjr.com/ – simplest and free – MacDown. It’s 2 panes, type text on one side, renders Markdown on the other side

 

Roy Question for Bridget – where you used to believe Open Source was not a good thing, how do you feel now? – When you have intellectual property and you give it away for free – it is your choice. The thing that’s great about WordPress, it’s not about planned obsolescence.  They don’t create something that will break to create new customers. This is the issue that she has with Gutenberg. WordPress believes that everyone has the right to publish and stands upon the idea that they will never break your site. Gutenberg might break that. What is the best solution for your customer/user?

Bridget:

  • The relationships and people are what makes WordPress valuable.
  • WordPress is at a crossroads, do we want to stay with our core beliefs that it’s all about ‘democratizing publishing’ or do we bow to capitalism?
  • I love WordPress, I love the community and I love the WPblab group even more!!

 

______________
Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

 

The post WPblab – 100th Episode Mastermind – Lifelong Learning with Our Community appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP99 – WordPress – Do we really need a specialty Meetup?]]> Fri, 20 Apr 2018 01:42:44 GMT 57:40 no

WordPress is a diverse and inclusive community. So why do we have specialty Meetups? Do we need one? In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard invite the founder of Women Who WP, Jen Miller to talk about this important subject.

Jen Miller – the WPblab unofficial show producer!  

 

Started a specialty group called WomenWhoWP – geared toward women, but open to everyone!  The setup is a little different than a traditional meetup because “woman dialogue differently”. Yvonne originally coined that phrase. They wanted to be able to share and grow and dialogue together regularly!

 

Why do you need a woman’s meetup?  Men don’t see how much they dominate the conversation (and how much more they are represented in tech – Bridget was one of only a few woman at a recent Developer meetup).  

 

The way women relate at meetups is far different than the way men do. Men also ask questions differently – women tend to include more social details and stories, and men tend to get straight to the point.

 

Friendship is when you say “oh my gosh – me too!”  Women feel comfortable sharing when they feel others understand them or can relate. As their group has grown, more of those women have started attending the regular WP meetup as well!

 

Bridget has a mug on the show that happened because of WomenWhoWP – it came from a friend at WordCamp Mumbai – Meher is doing a WWWP group in Mumbai.  WWWP is now worldwide – women are excited about it!

 

They saw in their own meetup, they & other women in the group didn’t get to spend much time talking together, so they decided they needed to set aside time to really relate with each other.

 

WWWP meetings happen over food at restaurants. They have discussions over dinner so by the time the presentation happens, everyone feels like they’ve bonded and created friendships.

 

How you are physically in a room and your body language matters – it makes a huge difference in how people relate to you.

 

https://www.boldgrid.com/boldlife-episode-6-bridget-willard/#more-14611

 

They have made it a really big deal to encourage each other not to describe themselves as “just” anything… (just a blogger, just a designer, just a writer, etc…) They work hard to validate each other. Wherever you are in your journey – it matters! What you are doing matters.

 

Ages at their local WomenWhoWP meetup range in ages from 22 – 70!  You can’t have mentorship if you only hang around the people who are your age.  They’ve even had visiting 12-yr-olds!

 

It’s amazing what every individual who comes contributes to the group! They all have something unique to add. The group spends time each month also sharing the new things that each of them learned.

 

Amy Hall in the chat: “It’s the acceptance that makes it awesome” – it’s so true – that’s what make the WordPress community special.  Women at the WWWP meetups get to really know when another – they know you when you walk in the room and they care if/when you show up.

 

There was one time where Bridget wasn’t going to attend one month (she was late, having a bad day, etc.) but then she went anyway and when she walked in everyone was excited to see her and made a big deal out of welcoming her into the group. They treated her like family and made her feel wanted/needed and made her day.

 

They have a general, business, design, developer and WWWP meetup in their area – all specialty meetups that all cater to certain people.  As a community grows, and if it’s big enough and invested enough, it’s a great way to help grow and expand specific skill sets.

 

Make sure to get your meetup connected to the WordPress meetup Chapter Program so that people will be able to find it more easily.

 

Zeek Interactive sponsors the Women Who WP meetups by providing the location.

 

At WCUS, they have a special LGBTQ afterparty – sometimes it’s just great to connect with your tribe – the people you identify with.

 

The original meetup started by Zeek spawned a whole bunch of spin off meetups that followed a similar format. It’s important to have a format and a plan – when Jason visits other meetups, sometimes they can feel a little aimless.  It’s such a big difference to attend one where there is a schedule and format. That’s what makes the meetups at Zeek Interactive and WWWP meetups so great!

 

As Jason’s meetup grows, he’s noticing there is a growing divide between those who are on a developer level and those who are just beginning and figuring their way around.  It’s around this time in any meetup where it’s a good time to ask yourself – is it time to start a specialty meetup?

 

They encourage every Women Who WP chapter to have 3 organizers. That way if someone needs a month off, they are able to take the time without worrying about the group. That way they are able to keep continuity in the group and keep things flowing.

 

It helps to have a team and share the responsibilities (and the spotlight!) It helps balance the load and plays to each individual team members’ strengths.

 

Mentoring people and allowing them to grow into the position while they have you as a safety net is really important.  The group should be able to continue and move on even when one of the team leaders isn’t available and has to move somewhere else.  We should be like “sourdough starters”!

 

No one likes to say it but a lot of people like to ‘control’, but if you’re controlling, you’re not mentoring and your stifling the development of your community.

 

They aren’t telling people what to say or how to be a part of the group, they are modeling and mentoring and the group members are learning by example.  Jen: “We’re not in this for us, we’re in this for them – for this community”. They’re doing to expand the audience so everyone can learn together.

 

There are starting to be some specialty WordCamps – maybe someday even a WomenWhoWP WordCamp?! It’s possible!  WwWP had a booth at WCUS and because of that visibility, groups in other countries were started.

 

One of the things they do that’s really different is they invest in the community. When members write on the meetup community page (on Facebook or meetup.com) that they can’t go, the organizers make sure to ‘like’ the comment and reply to them to let them know they’ll be missed!

 

(sidebar: please put your face (an actual photo) on your Meetup profile so organizers recognize you! And everyone else!!)

 

We may be meeting once a month, but we’re keeping things going even outside of our meetups.

 

Intentionally, the organizers choose not to sit together. They’re there for the other people who attend the group, so they distribute themselves around the room. That way, everyone feels like they have access to the leaders. It can be a challenge in some rooms to sit apart but try to be intentional about it! It’s important to make sure you’re always talking to new people in the room.

 

If you want to be a meetup leader, you have to sometimes go out of your comfort zone – talk to people you wouldn’t normally – stretch yourself!

 

There’s a twitter thread started by Dwayne McDaniel today talking about “what’s your favorite part of speaking”… Bridget’s answer was: “I speak because I teach. My passion is that moment on someone's face where they get it. When I speak and they feel empowered. When they come up and say, “That's it?” And I'm like, yeah. You just tweeted.”

 

We try to hit all the topics so that everyone can learn something different.  Even seasoned developers. A lot of times in WordPress, we learn what we need for the project, but not in depth.

 

Jen took a Front End Development course at Udacity through Grow with Google scholarship.  She learned to code. She’s been in WordPress for 10 years so she had an understanding of html/css/javascript but never in a systematic approach.  It really helped her to see all the parts in an incremental way and gave accountability as she progressed through her learning. It’s been great! She’s learning more and more and that’s not something she always to get to spend a lot of time on.  It’s helped her and her community! It made her feel good because she realized any one of the women she’s connected with could also do this! Last week at WordCamp San Diego she actually spoke about Gutenberg!

 

One of the really interesting things that happened, is during the final project she was having trouble getting some of the code to work. She asked the lead developer to look at it and he sent a message back saying thanks and that “he learned a lot” from her problem because he had to go research it, which helped him to level up too! It raised his respect for her and her for him.

 

Jen would never have taken this on if WomenWhoWP had never happened.  She’s doing it to show people that they don’t need to put themselves in a box – they can learn new skills. Just because they are great in one and feel set, it doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t try to enhance their skills or try for something they don’t think they can get.  Jen didn’t think she has the relevant experience to be accepted, but she was! Take the risk – go after something your really want to learn!

 

Tools of the week:

Bridget – https://www.touchnote.com/us/ – it’s an app to send your photos as postcards, prints

Jason – https://www.decksetapp.com/ – a way to do presentations for Mac, makes slide decks really easily without having to do any design work. It is done entirely in Markdown format.  Costs $29 – $116 for a team.

Jen – https://www.udacity.com/ – she loves their learning style and they do so many different subjects in their Nanodegree program | https://codepen.io/ – to store all of her code snippets (includes editor that allows previews too)

 

______________
Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP99 – WordPress – Do we really need a specialty Meetup? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

WordPress is a diverse and inclusive community. So why do we have specialty Meetups? Do we need one? In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard invite the founder of Women Who WP, Jen Miller to talk about this important subject.

Jen Miller – the WPblab unofficial show producer!  

 

Started a specialty group called WomenWhoWP – geared toward women, but open to everyone!  The setup is a little different than a traditional meetup because “woman dialogue differently”. Yvonne originally coined that phrase. They wanted to be able to share and grow and dialogue together regularly!

 

Why do you need a woman’s meetup?  Men don’t see how much they dominate the conversation (and how much more they are represented in tech – Bridget was one of only a few woman at a recent Developer meetup).  

 

The way women relate at meetups is far different than the way men do. Men also ask questions differently – women tend to include more social details and stories, and men tend to get straight to the point.

 

Friendship is when you say “oh my gosh – me too!”  Women feel comfortable sharing when they feel others understand them or can relate. As their group has grown, more of those women have started attending the regular WP meetup as well!

 

Bridget has a mug on the show that happened because of WomenWhoWP – it came from a friend at WordCamp Mumbai – Meher is doing a WWWP group in Mumbai.  WWWP is now worldwide – women are excited about it!

 

They saw in their own meetup, they & other women in the group didn’t get to spend much time talking together, so they decided they needed to set aside time to really relate with each other.

 

WWWP meetings happen over food at restaurants. They have discussions over dinner so by the time the presentation happens, everyone feels like they’ve bonded and created friendships.

 

How you are physically in a room and your body language matters – it makes a huge difference in how people relate to you.

 

https://www.boldgrid.com/boldlife-episode-6-bridget-willard/#more-14611

 

They have made it a really big deal to encourage each other not to describe themselves as “just” anything… (just a blogger, just a designer, just a writer, etc…) They work hard to validate each other. Wherever you are in your journey – it matters! What you are doing matters.

 

Ages at their local WomenWhoWP meetup range in ages from 22 – 70!  You can’t have mentorship if you only hang around the people who are your age.  They’ve even had visiting 12-yr-olds!

 

It’s amazing what every individual who comes contributes to the group! They all have something unique to add. The group spends time each month also sharing the new things that each of them learned.

 

Amy Hall in the chat: “It’s the acceptance that makes it awesome” – it’s so true – that’s what make the WordPress community special.  Women at the WWWP meetups get to really know when another – they know you when you walk in the room and they care if/when you show up.

 

There was one time where Bridget wasn’t going to attend one month (she was late, having a bad day, etc.) but then she went anyway and when she walked in everyone was excited to see her and made a big deal out of welcoming her into the group. They treated her like family and made her feel wanted/needed and made her day.

 

They have a general, business, design, developer and WWWP meetup in their area – all specialty meetups that all cater to certain people.  As a community grows, and if it’s big enough and invested enough, it’s a great way to help grow and expand specific skill sets.

 

Make sure to get your meetup connected to the WordPress meetup Chapter Program so that people will be able to find it more easily.

 

Zeek Interactive sponsors the Women Who WP meetups by providing the location.

 

At WCUS, they have a special LGBTQ afterparty – sometimes it’s just great to connect with your tribe – the people you identify with.

 

The original meetup started by Zeek spawned a whole bunch of spin off meetups that followed a similar format. It’s important to have a format and a plan – when Jason visits other meetups, sometimes they can feel a little aimless.  It’s such a big difference to attend one where there is a schedule and format. That’s what makes the meetups at Zeek Interactive and WWWP meetups so great!

 

As Jason’s meetup grows, he’s noticing there is a growing divide between those who are on a developer level and those who are just beginning and figuring their way around.  It’s around this time in any meetup where it’s a good time to ask yourself – is it time to start a specialty meetup?

 

They encourage every Women Who WP chapter to have 3 organizers. That way if someone needs a month off, they are able to take the time without worrying about the group. That way they are able to keep continuity in the group and keep things flowing.

 

It helps to have a team and share the responsibilities (and the spotlight!) It helps balance the load and plays to each individual team members’ strengths.

 

Mentoring people and allowing them to grow into the position while they have you as a safety net is really important.  The group should be able to continue and move on even when one of the team leaders isn’t available and has to move somewhere else.  We should be like “sourdough starters”!

 

No one likes to say it but a lot of people like to ‘control’, but if you’re controlling, you’re not mentoring and your stifling the development of your community.

 

They aren’t telling people what to say or how to be a part of the group, they are modeling and mentoring and the group members are learning by example.  Jen: “We’re not in this for us, we’re in this for them – for this community”. They’re doing to expand the audience so everyone can learn together.

 

There are starting to be some specialty WordCamps – maybe someday even a WomenWhoWP WordCamp?! It’s possible!  WwWP had a booth at WCUS and because of that visibility, groups in other countries were started.

 

One of the things they do that’s really different is they invest in the community. When members write on the meetup community page (on Facebook or meetup.com) that they can’t go, the organizers make sure to ‘like’ the comment and reply to them to let them know they’ll be missed!

 

(sidebar: please put your face (an actual photo) on your Meetup profile so organizers recognize you! And everyone else!!)

 

We may be meeting once a month, but we’re keeping things going even outside of our meetups.

 

Intentionally, the organizers choose not to sit together. They’re there for the other people who attend the group, so they distribute themselves around the room. That way, everyone feels like they have access to the leaders. It can be a challenge in some rooms to sit apart but try to be intentional about it! It’s important to make sure you’re always talking to new people in the room.

 

If you want to be a meetup leader, you have to sometimes go out of your comfort zone – talk to people you wouldn’t normally – stretch yourself!

 

There’s a twitter thread started by Dwayne McDaniel today talking about “what’s your favorite part of speaking”… Bridget’s answer was: “I speak because I teach. My passion is that moment on someone's face where they get it. When I speak and they feel empowered. When they come up and say, “That's it?” And I'm like, yeah. You just tweeted.”

 

We try to hit all the topics so that everyone can learn something different.  Even seasoned developers. A lot of times in WordPress, we learn what we need for the project, but not in depth.

 

Jen took a Front End Development course at Udacity through Grow with Google scholarship.  She learned to code. She’s been in WordPress for 10 years so she had an understanding of html/css/javascript but never in a systematic approach.  It really helped her to see all the parts in an incremental way and gave accountability as she progressed through her learning. It’s been great! She’s learning more and more and that’s not something she always to get to spend a lot of time on.  It’s helped her and her community! It made her feel good because she realized any one of the women she’s connected with could also do this! Last week at WordCamp San Diego she actually spoke about Gutenberg!

 

One of the really interesting things that happened, is during the final project she was having trouble getting some of the code to work. She asked the lead developer to look at it and he sent a message back saying thanks and that “he learned a lot” from her problem because he had to go research it, which helped him to level up too! It raised his respect for her and her for him.

 

Jen would never have taken this on if WomenWhoWP had never happened.  She’s doing it to show people that they don’t need to put themselves in a box – they can learn new skills. Just because they are great in one and feel set, it doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t try to enhance their skills or try for something they don’t think they can get.  Jen didn’t think she has the relevant experience to be accepted, but she was! Take the risk – go after something your really want to learn!

 

Tools of the week:

Bridget – https://www.touchnote.com/us/ – it’s an app to send your photos as postcards, prints

Jason – https://www.decksetapp.com/ – a way to do presentations for Mac, makes slide decks really easily without having to do any design work. It is done entirely in Markdown format.  Costs $29 – $116 for a team.

Jen – https://www.udacity.com/ – she loves their learning style and they do so many different subjects in their Nanodegree program | https://codepen.io/ – to store all of her code snippets (includes editor that allows previews too)

 

______________
Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie

The post WPblab EP99 – WordPress – Do we really need a specialty Meetup? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP98 – Social Media And Your Brand: Facebook]]> Thu, 05 Apr 2018 19:23:40 GMT 1:01:50 no

You have a brand but how are you handling it? Maybe you are self-taught and have a few gaps. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are going to cover the basics of using Facebook for your business. Bring your questions in the live chat.

What not to do:

Do not create a Facebook profile that is not you as a real person! If you create a false profile to manage your FB page and FB takes your fake profile down, you’ll no longer have access to your Facebook page.

A Facebook Profile or Timeline must represent a real person.

https://www.facebook.com/help/community/question/?id=10151510422339065

 

The worst offenders in this area are churches.

The reason why you don’t want your profile to be your ‘page’ is because profiles have mutual ‘viewing’ privileges. Would you want a business page to see your personal details when all you want is to follow them on Facebook?  Bridget: It’s lazy, it violates the FB Terms and it compromises the privacy of your fans/users/customers.

Tagging accounts and people on facebook to let them know you are sharing info about their services / business /photos is great – tagging people just to get their attention on your random post is not great.  Think carefully before you tag!

Pages allow you to have insights, advertise, host events, and much more. There are 6 different types of pages available. Note, that you have the ability to use Facebook ‘as your page’ – allows you to interact with other pages and people as your page, instead of using your personal profile. This is a great way of getting exposure for your brand from other brands!

Create a Page here:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/create/ – you can make as many pages as you like!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/feed  – see a list of the pages you’ve liked as your page

 

You will need a Profile photo and a cover photo for your page. Profile should be 500 x 500 pixel square. It’s a good idea to have a square version of your logo for this reason. Cover photo should be 851 x 315 pixels.

You can create both in Canva.com for free.

You can also use Pablo from Buffer: https://pablo.buffer.com

Think about who you want as Page Roles, too. Bridget wrote a blog post on things to consider on that here:

https://bridgetwillard.com/how-to-setup-a-facebook-page/

When you create featured images on your blog (1200 x 628), make sure there is less than 20% text. Facebook will accept your ad dollars, but is kind of a jerk about this rule. Even your video thumbnails need to follow this rule.

One of the benefits provided to facebook pages is stats & analytics.  Very helpful for advertising.

“Data without context means nothing.” Looking at the stats content matters, but you need to understand what you are looking at it and what it means for you and your business.

Don’t spend more than 10 minutes looking at your data … it’s too easy to get distracted or lost in the weeds.  Glance at it, gather the information you need and move on.

There is no way to play a YouTube/Google Hangout live video directly on Facebook. If you want to do something like that, you could use something like Zoom/LiveStream. Live video to Facebook is easiest using Facebook Live – one really good method is using your phone. You can interact and respond to viewers live.

You can also schedule your video, allows you to set it all up ahead of time. It will notify the people who said they want to watch, so they’re able to tune in when it starts.

Facebook Live Video- https://live.fb.com/about/

Youtube has a similar feature and will notify users who have expressed interest in your video.

You’re also able to download your videos from YouTube, Facebook, etc. and then upload them to the other platforms that you use. That way it can natively play within that platform.

If you can create events, do so 2 weeks ahead.

 

Guide

https://www.facebook.com/help/116346471784004

 

You can embed your Facebook videos on your WordPress blog – DO share your other content on your WordPress blog!!  Facebook now also lets you record in landscape mode which is better for websites.

After you run your facebook live, Facebook will also give you an option to “Boost” your video post – this is a great way to advertise! Facebook has really powerful tools to help you ‘target’ your ads to the ideal audience.

When you choose send people to your website, you are able to set up targeting based upon:

  • Location
  • Interests
  • If they like your page

We are human beings and humans are ‘social animals’ – people will relate to your business better if you post actual images of you and your team. People want to know you and know about what you’re doing. Everyone has a sphere of influence and everyone's an expert in something. Share that!

Don’t stream live, have a chatroom and then ignore your viewers and their comments – you might as well not even bother!  You’ll never get away from the fact that our brains are wired for social interaction.

When you post something on your facebook page, the very least you can do is like it and if you’re really trying hard, you’ll reply to them! If you react and interact with your fans, you’ll build loyalty!  Treat them well, be friendly, be kind. Stop chasing big “influencers” – go after the people who are already your super-fans and engage them. Be authentic – don’t say BS – say what you mean!

If you’re just broadcasting out and not looking at the live chat, then you’re wasting your time. People want interaction with you and your brand. You need to have someone managing these interactions.  This can easily be done from home or anywhere.

You can hire transcribers or use transcription services to transcribe your videos for you.


Tools/Tips of the Week:

  • Bridget – Freshbooks (30 days free trial): not just for accepting payments; awesome at tax time!
    • Jason used Gravity Forms with a Freshbooks add-on – can create auto-estimates based on what they fill out on the from and it will pre-populate Freshbooks for you.

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP98 – Social Media And Your Brand: Facebook appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

You have a brand but how are you handling it? Maybe you are self-taught and have a few gaps. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are going to cover the basics of using Facebook for your business. Bring your questions in the live chat.

What not to do:

Do not create a Facebook profile that is not you as a real person! If you create a false profile to manage your FB page and FB takes your fake profile down, you’ll no longer have access to your Facebook page.

A Facebook Profile or Timeline must represent a real person.

https://www.facebook.com/help/community/question/?id=10151510422339065

 

The worst offenders in this area are churches.

The reason why you don’t want your profile to be your ‘page’ is because profiles have mutual ‘viewing’ privileges. Would you want a business page to see your personal details when all you want is to follow them on Facebook?  Bridget: It’s lazy, it violates the FB Terms and it compromises the privacy of your fans/users/customers.

Tagging accounts and people on facebook to let them know you are sharing info about their services / business /photos is great – tagging people just to get their attention on your random post is not great.  Think carefully before you tag!

Pages allow you to have insights, advertise, host events, and much more. There are 6 different types of pages available. Note, that you have the ability to use Facebook ‘as your page’ – allows you to interact with other pages and people as your page, instead of using your personal profile. This is a great way of getting exposure for your brand from other brands!

Create a Page here:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/create/ – you can make as many pages as you like!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/feed  – see a list of the pages you’ve liked as your page

 

You will need a Profile photo and a cover photo for your page. Profile should be 500 x 500 pixel square. It’s a good idea to have a square version of your logo for this reason. Cover photo should be 851 x 315 pixels.

You can create both in Canva.com for free.

You can also use Pablo from Buffer: https://pablo.buffer.com

Think about who you want as Page Roles, too. Bridget wrote a blog post on things to consider on that here:

https://bridgetwillard.com/how-to-setup-a-facebook-page/

When you create featured images on your blog (1200 x 628), make sure there is less than 20% text. Facebook will accept your ad dollars, but is kind of a jerk about this rule. Even your video thumbnails need to follow this rule.

One of the benefits provided to facebook pages is stats & analytics.  Very helpful for advertising.

“Data without context means nothing.” Looking at the stats content matters, but you need to understand what you are looking at it and what it means for you and your business.

Don’t spend more than 10 minutes looking at your data … it’s too easy to get distracted or lost in the weeds.  Glance at it, gather the information you need and move on.

There is no way to play a YouTube/Google Hangout live video directly on Facebook. If you want to do something like that, you could use something like Zoom/LiveStream. Live video to Facebook is easiest using Facebook Live – one really good method is using your phone. You can interact and respond to viewers live.

You can also schedule your video, allows you to set it all up ahead of time. It will notify the people who said they want to watch, so they’re able to tune in when it starts.

Facebook Live Video- https://live.fb.com/about/

Youtube has a similar feature and will notify users who have expressed interest in your video.

You’re also able to download your videos from YouTube, Facebook, etc. and then upload them to the other platforms that you use. That way it can natively play within that platform.

If you can create events, do so 2 weeks ahead.

 

Guide

https://www.facebook.com/help/116346471784004

 

You can embed your Facebook videos on your WordPress blog – DO share your other content on your WordPress blog!!  Facebook now also lets you record in landscape mode which is better for websites.

After you run your facebook live, Facebook will also give you an option to “Boost” your video post – this is a great way to advertise! Facebook has really powerful tools to help you ‘target’ your ads to the ideal audience.

When you choose send people to your website, you are able to set up targeting based upon:

  • Location
  • Interests
  • If they like your page

We are human beings and humans are ‘social animals’ – people will relate to your business better if you post actual images of you and your team. People want to know you and know about what you’re doing. Everyone has a sphere of influence and everyone's an expert in something. Share that!

Don’t stream live, have a chatroom and then ignore your viewers and their comments – you might as well not even bother!  You’ll never get away from the fact that our brains are wired for social interaction.

When you post something on your facebook page, the very least you can do is like it and if you’re really trying hard, you’ll reply to them! If you react and interact with your fans, you’ll build loyalty!  Treat them well, be friendly, be kind. Stop chasing big “influencers” – go after the people who are already your super-fans and engage them. Be authentic – don’t say BS – say what you mean!

If you’re just broadcasting out and not looking at the live chat, then you’re wasting your time. People want interaction with you and your brand. You need to have someone managing these interactions.  This can easily be done from home or anywhere.

You can hire transcribers or use transcription services to transcribe your videos for you.


Tools/Tips of the Week:

  • Bridget – Freshbooks (30 days free trial): not just for accepting payments; awesome at tax time!
    • Jason used Gravity Forms with a Freshbooks add-on – can create auto-estimates based on what they fill out on the from and it will pre-populate Freshbooks for you.

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP98 – Social Media And Your Brand: Facebook appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP97 – WordPress Plugins – Building Your Mailing List]]> Wed, 28 Mar 2018 19:19:28 GMT 1:02:11 no

In this episode, Jason and Bridget get back to marketing basics. You have a WordPress site. So? How are you getting email subscribers? What types of strategies work and which WordPress plugins do the best job. Tune in this week to find out and join the live chat to chime in.

The post WPblab EP97 – WordPress Plugins – Building Your Mailing List appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Jason and Bridget get back to marketing basics. You have a WordPress site. So? How are you getting email subscribers? What types of strategies work and which WordPress plugins do the best job. Tune in this week to find out and join the live chat to chime in.

The post WPblab EP97 – WordPress Plugins – Building Your Mailing List appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP96 – Pros and Cons of Brand Fragmentation]]> Thu, 22 Mar 2018 23:42:20 GMT 58:45 no

Tonight on WPblab, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard speak with James Tryon about the pros and cons of fragmenting your brand. Should you keep all of your products together under a company umbrella or have separate identities? Let’s talk business goals and marketing tonight.

 

James Tryon is Lead Ambassador for Wapu.us – helps promote brand recognition for the WordPress project

His company: Easily Amused Inc.

https://easilyamusedinc.com/

 

Salesman Rick – Rick and Morty affiliate links store

https://salesmanricks.com/

 

BlocksWP – resource for learning about Gutenberg blocks

http://blockswp.com/

 

Runs @TheGutes twitter account (Gutenberg related)

https://twitter.com/thegutes

 

A lot of his companies are DBA’s under his main company

 

It seems to be a relatively common practice for businesses to ‘fragment’ their brand and keep separate social accounts for each part of their business – Bridget thinks this is a really terrible idea…

 

Don’t launch a product on a squeaky clean account with 0 followers and no brand recognition!!!

 

Sometimes it makes sense to fragment yourself, such as splitting business and personal accounts where something is not appropriate or doesn’t belong on your single account.  But remember, you are doubling your work!!

 

Bridget – it’s like a ‘stock split’ – you have twice as much stock, but it’s worth half as much

 

If you have lots of products and each product has its own accounts, then every time you launch a new product, you have to start over from scratch!  

 

James doesn’t necessarily like being as fragmented as he is, but it kind of made sense to do so. The current brand he is working on now happens to be in a different industry. Sometimes fragmenting makes sense as a way to protect each of your ‘products’ or ideas from each other.

 

If you are selling a very low value product with one part of your business but then also selling custom site development for several thousand with your agency, you may want to separate them to the cheaper solutions don’t devalue your main brand

 

Sometimes there are also business, financial, tax reasons to separate out as well

 

Bridget wonders what happens if she changes her name – her brand uses her current name, so can she keep her brand name or does she need to change it? …Should you have a company name instead of using your name? Should you consider using a middle name instead of a last name?  There are many factors to consider!

 

The same thing happens with your company – The company, the product, and you are all identities – what is the best way to brand yourself?

 

Do you want to be a house of brands or a brand of houses? (Chris Lema)  

 

When you’re a giant company – you can have multiple separate teams for each of your products, but if you’re a small business, it’s hard to have the necessary resources to work on building each of those separate brands successfully and it likely makes more sense to concentrate your efforts on one brand!

 

You don’t want to find yourself in the position where you realize you haven’t tweeted or posted in several days on one of your brands – fragmenting yourself creates that risk

 

If you have 5 different plugins and you’re only 1 person with maybe a couple helpers, you would start stretching yourself too thin. If you’re questioning whether to fragment your brand with separate social accounts – go ahead and reserve the twitter (social media) handles and/or website domains and then you can phase in your efforts later as your company grows. Essentially ‘flag planting’.

 

If you’re going to fragment – go ALL in. Be cognizant of how much time it takes to build an account from scratch; it takes a LOT of time!

 

If you are fragmented with 2 or more accounts, another question is whether it makes sense to merge them and delete one of the accounts.   The risk from merging is that you’ll lose followers from both accounts.

 

James has an individual domain name and social account for all of his brands

 

CONS: Money, resources, obscurity (starting from scratch can be good if you have a bad reputation, but not so great if your reputation is a good one)

 

When you have multiple brands, sometimes there is brand confusion – where clients will say “oh, I didn’t know you did that too” …. They could have used you to help with another need, but the brand recognition wasn’t there

 

Last 15 mins

James –  https://minddoodle.com/ – mind mapping tool, completely free!

Jason – https://pasteapp.me/ – manage your clipboard on your Mac

Bridget (tool/tip requests)

— starting to use Windows computers more often – wants a Mac standard keyboard that works with a Windows computer!

— stop using crappy CMS’s!

— ask people (customers) where they come from and don’t accept “the internet” as the answer!

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP96 – Pros and Cons of Brand Fragmentation appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Tonight on WPblab, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard speak with James Tryon about the pros and cons of fragmenting your brand. Should you keep all of your products together under a company umbrella or have separate identities? Let’s talk business goals and marketing tonight.

 

James Tryon is Lead Ambassador for Wapu.us – helps promote brand recognition for the WordPress project

His company: Easily Amused Inc.

https://easilyamusedinc.com/

 

Salesman Rick – Rick and Morty affiliate links store

https://salesmanricks.com/

 

BlocksWP – resource for learning about Gutenberg blocks

http://blockswp.com/

 

Runs @TheGutes twitter account (Gutenberg related)

https://twitter.com/thegutes

 

A lot of his companies are DBA’s under his main company

 

It seems to be a relatively common practice for businesses to ‘fragment’ their brand and keep separate social accounts for each part of their business – Bridget thinks this is a really terrible idea…

 

Don’t launch a product on a squeaky clean account with 0 followers and no brand recognition!!!

 

Sometimes it makes sense to fragment yourself, such as splitting business and personal accounts where something is not appropriate or doesn’t belong on your single account.  But remember, you are doubling your work!!

 

Bridget – it’s like a ‘stock split’ – you have twice as much stock, but it’s worth half as much

 

If you have lots of products and each product has its own accounts, then every time you launch a new product, you have to start over from scratch!  

 

James doesn’t necessarily like being as fragmented as he is, but it kind of made sense to do so. The current brand he is working on now happens to be in a different industry. Sometimes fragmenting makes sense as a way to protect each of your ‘products’ or ideas from each other.

 

If you are selling a very low value product with one part of your business but then also selling custom site development for several thousand with your agency, you may want to separate them to the cheaper solutions don’t devalue your main brand

 

Sometimes there are also business, financial, tax reasons to separate out as well

 

Bridget wonders what happens if she changes her name – her brand uses her current name, so can she keep her brand name or does she need to change it? …Should you have a company name instead of using your name? Should you consider using a middle name instead of a last name?  There are many factors to consider!

 

The same thing happens with your company – The company, the product, and you are all identities – what is the best way to brand yourself?

 

Do you want to be a house of brands or a brand of houses? (Chris Lema)  

 

When you’re a giant company – you can have multiple separate teams for each of your products, but if you’re a small business, it’s hard to have the necessary resources to work on building each of those separate brands successfully and it likely makes more sense to concentrate your efforts on one brand!

 

You don’t want to find yourself in the position where you realize you haven’t tweeted or posted in several days on one of your brands – fragmenting yourself creates that risk

 

If you have 5 different plugins and you’re only 1 person with maybe a couple helpers, you would start stretching yourself too thin. If you’re questioning whether to fragment your brand with separate social accounts – go ahead and reserve the twitter (social media) handles and/or website domains and then you can phase in your efforts later as your company grows. Essentially ‘flag planting’.

 

If you’re going to fragment – go ALL in. Be cognizant of how much time it takes to build an account from scratch; it takes a LOT of time!

 

If you are fragmented with 2 or more accounts, another question is whether it makes sense to merge them and delete one of the accounts.   The risk from merging is that you’ll lose followers from both accounts.

 

James has an individual domain name and social account for all of his brands

 

CONS: Money, resources, obscurity (starting from scratch can be good if you have a bad reputation, but not so great if your reputation is a good one)

 

When you have multiple brands, sometimes there is brand confusion – where clients will say “oh, I didn’t know you did that too” …. They could have used you to help with another need, but the brand recognition wasn’t there

 

Last 15 mins

James –  https://minddoodle.com/ – mind mapping tool, completely free!

Jason – https://pasteapp.me/ – manage your clipboard on your Mac

Bridget (tool/tip requests)

— starting to use Windows computers more often – wants a Mac standard keyboard that works with a Windows computer!

— stop using crappy CMS’s!

— ask people (customers) where they come from and don’t accept “the internet” as the answer!

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP96 – Pros and Cons of Brand Fragmentation appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP95 – Situational Awareness: When to Pause Marketing Campaigns w/ Amy Donohue]]> Wed, 28 Feb 2018 00:23:55 GMT 57:31 no

It's easy to jump on trends, try to be extreme to get attention, but what price do you pay? Do you get eyes or alienate your audience? Join Jason and Bridget with Guest Amy Donohue this week on WPblab where they will discuss it. If you have some strong opinions, watch live and join in the chat. We're all learning, right?

Show sponsored by PressedLinks

Amy Donohue

Know when to take a break on your social when something bad happens. Your business is not going to fail if you take a day off to when tragedy hits.

 

The evolution of social can make your brand anti-social with comes to auto posting.

Make sure you’re not tweeting from the dead.

Show more compassion when bad things happen and take a break from your agendas.

http://halfstaff.org/

https://github.com/Nomikxyz/flag-at-half-mast

 

Social media managers during a crisis, retweet relevant information

Amy doesn't let her clients know when she is pausing their campaigns

Marketing calendars should be flexible.

In cannabis filling tweets 2 weeks in advance could create problems because things change on a daily basis.

Respect the hashtag. Don’t hijack trending hashtags to promote your business when not related.

Use trending topics for what they are for… trending topics.

How long should a social media campaign say paused?

  • It depends, how bad was it?
  • If you use a location-based hashtag for marketing, pause use until after the news has stopped.
  • Taking selfies of yourself volunteering is not good for your brand, says Amy. Put the camera away and use 2 hands to help.

Sell hurricane equipment before that season, not after.

If you have a local business during a local emergency don’t go silent. Use your blog and social media to share resources or help others. – Jen Miller

When in doubt, lay out.

  • Bridget

Came from when planing in a band and not feeling a song.

Look to OREO – they were prepared and made their team aware. Be responsive and it can be a win for your brand. – Bridget

Tip of the week

  • Bridget 
    • Make.WordPress.org/marketing started using google docs more.
    • Suggest mode in google docs. suggest let you make changes and someone can accept it and the changes just happen.
  • Amy
    • Linkedin is a networking group. Also Cannabis friendly. Be genuine, small conversations

Show notes contributed by:

James Tryon @JamesTryon

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u

The post WPblab EP95 – Situational Awareness: When to Pause Marketing Campaigns w/ Amy Donohue appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

It's easy to jump on trends, try to be extreme to get attention, but what price do you pay? Do you get eyes or alienate your audience? Join Jason and Bridget with Guest Amy Donohue this week on WPblab where they will discuss it. If you have some strong opinions, watch live and join in the chat. We're all learning, right?

Show sponsored by PressedLinks

Amy Donohue

Know when to take a break on your social when something bad happens. Your business is not going to fail if you take a day off to when tragedy hits.

 

The evolution of social can make your brand anti-social with comes to auto posting.

Make sure you’re not tweeting from the dead.

Show more compassion when bad things happen and take a break from your agendas.

http://halfstaff.org/

https://github.com/Nomikxyz/flag-at-half-mast

 

Social media managers during a crisis, retweet relevant information

Amy doesn't let her clients know when she is pausing their campaigns

Marketing calendars should be flexible.

In cannabis filling tweets 2 weeks in advance could create problems because things change on a daily basis.

Respect the hashtag. Don’t hijack trending hashtags to promote your business when not related.

Use trending topics for what they are for… trending topics.

How long should a social media campaign say paused?

  • It depends, how bad was it?
  • If you use a location-based hashtag for marketing, pause use until after the news has stopped.
  • Taking selfies of yourself volunteering is not good for your brand, says Amy. Put the camera away and use 2 hands to help.

Sell hurricane equipment before that season, not after.

If you have a local business during a local emergency don’t go silent. Use your blog and social media to share resources or help others. – Jen Miller

When in doubt, lay out.

  • Bridget

Came from when planing in a band and not feeling a song.

Look to OREO – they were prepared and made their team aware. Be responsive and it can be a win for your brand. – Bridget

Tip of the week

  • Bridget 
    • Make.WordPress.org/marketing started using google docs more.
    • Suggest mode in google docs. suggest let you make changes and someone can accept it and the changes just happen.
  • Amy
    • Linkedin is a networking group. Also Cannabis friendly. Be genuine, small conversations

Show notes contributed by:

James Tryon @JamesTryon

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u

The post WPblab EP95 – Situational Awareness: When to Pause Marketing Campaigns w/ Amy Donohue appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP94 – Exploring the Ethics of Marketing with Morten Rand-Hendriksen]]> Tue, 13 Feb 2018 20:46:46 GMT 59:15 no

Ethics in marketing? Yes. Marketing needs ethics, too. After all, many people say “marketing” like it's a four-letter word. Senior Staff Instructor at LinkedIn Learning, Morten Rand-Hendriksen joins us this week on WPblab to talk about ethics in marketing. With a passion for learning new things (including ballroom dancing with his wife), philosophy, and accessibility, Morten is well-known as an advocate for all things forward-facing in tech but realizes the ethics implications. Join us this week for the live chat to ask Morten your questions.

Twitter: @mor10
Site: http://mor10.com/

LinkedIn Learning & Lynda.com

Studied Philosophy at University

Ethics 101 (definition) … there are two terms you hear all the time – ethics & morals – two different aspects of the same thing (two sides of the same coin)

Morals – internalized understanding of what is right and wrong

Ethics – a human definition of systems that you use to define what is right and wrong

If you look at Ethical Theory, you are looking at Moral Traditions – confusingly!

There is often a disconnect in understanding the terminology between the two

“Cryptomining is a good example of why the web design industry needs ethics”

Ethics (as defined by Moren) – the rules that we create to allow us to judge individual actions and see if they are justifiable in a moral context

“Why don’t people in the WordPress community copy each others themes and release them in a different name” – there’s nothing that explicitly prevents it, but there are ethics that keep them from doing so

Kant’s Categorical Imperative (wikipedia) – act as if you want your act to be a universal law – this is how people should always behave

We need ethics in marketing – as you release this thing into the world, how do you want it to be handled

There’s a common misunderstanding that ethics provides you a list of dos and don’ts – it doesn’t – that is dogmatic moralism. Rather, ethics give you the tools to at least attempt to think through the decisions you make, before you turn those decisions to action (and see what the consequences might be)

Example: There is code that you can currently install on your site that runs crypto mining processes on the computers of everyone who visits your site – generates money and sends it back to the owner of the site

Consequentialism – what are the consequences of your actions and do those consequences improve the common good? It is okay if some people are disadvantaged as long as the large majority are advantaged.

In the case of the Crypto code – everyone is disadvantaged but the website owner, so Consequentialism would say – don’t do this!

Duty ethics – you have to perform acts in a way that you would want every other person to behave in that same situation, not because you have to, but because you actually believe that’s how it should be done

You have a duty of care to everyone who interacts with your website – unless you explicitly state that you are doing this, you are failing your visitors

Virtue Ethics – what kind of person do you become by performing the act. This is the oldest of these theories.  The idea is that a human can only become virtuous by aspiring to a set of virtues.

Is this the type of person that I want to be?  That I would want everyone else to be?

Capability Approach – the morality of an act has to be judged on what capabilities it grants the person it is acted upon. Does it improve their capabilities?

Start thinking about how what we are doing effects the ends user. What kind of future am I building for the people who are using this site?

A tiny toolkit to help you answer your own questions!

  1. What kind of world am I building for the end user?
  2. Who do I become by doing this?
  3. Do I want every other person to do this in the same circumstance?
  4. Am I increasing the overall utility for everyone? (everyone might be end user)

What is the value of getting an influencer to say something about your product?

You think they have more authority (there is value / money in that)
It’s because people innately believe what they say – even if not true – and respond to that influence
If you “ghost write” a review and make it seem as if it’s written entirely from the influencer, then the whole trust equation falls apart – your duty of care (ethically) would require you to disclose that information to your audience

The “Milli Vanilli” effect

100% GPL – if you aren’t 100% compliant, you can’t sponsor a WordCamp – how do ethics apply here

Someone has to make a decision about who is affected and who is not, it can become a very subjective decision. In WordPress, that person is often Matt Mullenweg – we are granting him license to do this by following along

The WordPress community largely rises and falls based on whether people are willing to buy into the importance and need of GPL

Ethics is complicated – every single person who is in the conversation will have a different viewpoint – if it’s a good ethical conversation, you touch on all the pain points enough that people are satisfied and everything has been accounted for

If we start over – what capabilities should we grant the end user and how do those capabilities help them improve their lives. One of the big values is that WordPress is free and (relatively) safe to use … you can formulate some overall idea.  We are granting the capability to publish to the internet anyone who has access to any internet connection

There is a constant battle between wanting to be the type of person who creates things for the WordPress community to freely use (open source) and also needing to be able to provide an income for yourself and your family – what is our ethical responsibility to ourselves and the end user?

Bridget: If you’re going to build a product and you decide to start with those 4 ‘toolkit’ questions as part of your branding standards, then you would already be about 70% of the way there

We are building a world for our end users – what kind of world do we want to build for them? What are the consequences of our choices? Ethics should not be a wet blanket on our creativity, it should be a hearth that keeps all that creativity from ‘burning down the house’

What did we do wrong here? How did we end up in the place? What can we do to keep it from happening again?

Tools of the Week

Bridget: HemmingwayApp.com

Jason: still using SetApp – but wishes it had Magnet (allows you to move items around on the screen to the edges and makes the windows snap)

Morten: Pocket – save articles to read later – strips out all the ads and just gives you the text – it can also read it back to you!  Even works with the Kobo e-Reader!!

Suggested reading for everyone: Virtual Reality As Possibility Space

Let us know who helped us out with the show notes (we’ll link to you)

  • Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
  • James Tryon @jamestryon (but not enough for a true bi-line)

The post WPblab EP94 – Exploring the Ethics of Marketing with Morten Rand-Hendriksen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Ethics in marketing? Yes. Marketing needs ethics, too. After all, many people say “marketing” like it's a four-letter word. Senior Staff Instructor at LinkedIn Learning, Morten Rand-Hendriksen joins us this week on WPblab to talk about ethics in marketing. With a passion for learning new things (including ballroom dancing with his wife), philosophy, and accessibility, Morten is well-known as an advocate for all things forward-facing in tech but realizes the ethics implications. Join us this week for the live chat to ask Morten your questions.

Twitter: @mor10
Site: http://mor10.com/

LinkedIn Learning & Lynda.com

Studied Philosophy at University

Ethics 101 (definition) … there are two terms you hear all the time – ethics & morals – two different aspects of the same thing (two sides of the same coin)

Morals – internalized understanding of what is right and wrong

Ethics – a human definition of systems that you use to define what is right and wrong

If you look at Ethical Theory, you are looking at Moral Traditions – confusingly!

There is often a disconnect in understanding the terminology between the two

“Cryptomining is a good example of why the web design industry needs ethics”

Ethics (as defined by Moren) – the rules that we create to allow us to judge individual actions and see if they are justifiable in a moral context

“Why don’t people in the WordPress community copy each others themes and release them in a different name” – there’s nothing that explicitly prevents it, but there are ethics that keep them from doing so

Kant’s Categorical Imperative (wikipedia) – act as if you want your act to be a universal law – this is how people should always behave

We need ethics in marketing – as you release this thing into the world, how do you want it to be handled

There’s a common misunderstanding that ethics provides you a list of dos and don’ts – it doesn’t – that is dogmatic moralism. Rather, ethics give you the tools to at least attempt to think through the decisions you make, before you turn those decisions to action (and see what the consequences might be)

Example: There is code that you can currently install on your site that runs crypto mining processes on the computers of everyone who visits your site – generates money and sends it back to the owner of the site

Consequentialism – what are the consequences of your actions and do those consequences improve the common good? It is okay if some people are disadvantaged as long as the large majority are advantaged.

In the case of the Crypto code – everyone is disadvantaged but the website owner, so Consequentialism would say – don’t do this!

Duty ethics – you have to perform acts in a way that you would want every other person to behave in that same situation, not because you have to, but because you actually believe that’s how it should be done

You have a duty of care to everyone who interacts with your website – unless you explicitly state that you are doing this, you are failing your visitors

Virtue Ethics – what kind of person do you become by performing the act. This is the oldest of these theories.  The idea is that a human can only become virtuous by aspiring to a set of virtues.

Is this the type of person that I want to be?  That I would want everyone else to be?

Capability Approach – the morality of an act has to be judged on what capabilities it grants the person it is acted upon. Does it improve their capabilities?

Start thinking about how what we are doing effects the ends user. What kind of future am I building for the people who are using this site?

A tiny toolkit to help you answer your own questions!

  1. What kind of world am I building for the end user?
  2. Who do I become by doing this?
  3. Do I want every other person to do this in the same circumstance?
  4. Am I increasing the overall utility for everyone? (everyone might be end user)

What is the value of getting an influencer to say something about your product?

You think they have more authority (there is value / money in that)
It’s because people innately believe what they say – even if not true – and respond to that influence
If you “ghost write” a review and make it seem as if it’s written entirely from the influencer, then the whole trust equation falls apart – your duty of care (ethically) would require you to disclose that information to your audience

The “Milli Vanilli” effect

100% GPL – if you aren’t 100% compliant, you can’t sponsor a WordCamp – how do ethics apply here

Someone has to make a decision about who is affected and who is not, it can become a very subjective decision. In WordPress, that person is often Matt Mullenweg – we are granting him license to do this by following along

The WordPress community largely rises and falls based on whether people are willing to buy into the importance and need of GPL

Ethics is complicated – every single person who is in the conversation will have a different viewpoint – if it’s a good ethical conversation, you touch on all the pain points enough that people are satisfied and everything has been accounted for

If we start over – what capabilities should we grant the end user and how do those capabilities help them improve their lives. One of the big values is that WordPress is free and (relatively) safe to use … you can formulate some overall idea.  We are granting the capability to publish to the internet anyone who has access to any internet connection

There is a constant battle between wanting to be the type of person who creates things for the WordPress community to freely use (open source) and also needing to be able to provide an income for yourself and your family – what is our ethical responsibility to ourselves and the end user?

Bridget: If you’re going to build a product and you decide to start with those 4 ‘toolkit’ questions as part of your branding standards, then you would already be about 70% of the way there

We are building a world for our end users – what kind of world do we want to build for them? What are the consequences of our choices? Ethics should not be a wet blanket on our creativity, it should be a hearth that keeps all that creativity from ‘burning down the house’

What did we do wrong here? How did we end up in the place? What can we do to keep it from happening again?

Tools of the Week

Bridget: HemmingwayApp.com

Jason: still using SetApp – but wishes it had Magnet (allows you to move items around on the screen to the edges and makes the windows snap)

Morten: Pocket – save articles to read later – strips out all the ads and just gives you the text – it can also read it back to you!  Even works with the Kobo e-Reader!!

Suggested reading for everyone: Virtual Reality As Possibility Space

Let us know who helped us out with the show notes (we’ll link to you)

  • Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
  • James Tryon @jamestryon (but not enough for a true bi-line)

The post WPblab EP94 – Exploring the Ethics of Marketing with Morten Rand-Hendriksen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP93 – Unorthodox Marketing with Meg Delagrange]]> Thu, 01 Feb 2018 02:37:33 GMT 59:04 no

Amish-born artist Meg Delagrange has always approached social media in an unorthodox way. She’s now in a venture of Design and Marketing at Urban Southern. This week on our show we’ll talk about taking an alternative approach to marketing can sometimes be the best play.

Bridget: “To me, the people that really stand out in marketing are the ones who do it a bit differently” (examples, Robert Nissenbaum, Rob Giles, Meg Delagrange)

Meg has a unique background that really stands out.  She’s helping to build a brand and can provide ‘unorthodox’ advice!  She puts a lot of her personality into her marketing.

How much of yourself should you put online?

  • Meg used to put almost everything online, but now that she knows herself better, she gives herself time to process first
  • There are guidelines … you may talk about dating, but best not to drop names – you have to know what is and isn’t okay to show …Ask yourself, “will this be valuable to someone else?”
  • You can share interesting/crazy stories that happen in your day, especially your mistakes – they can really resonate with people

Don’t be afraid to share benign / seemingly unrelated things about yourself (hobbies, etc) … they will give you more dimension

Started building her personal brand years ago (but wasn’t aware that she was at the time)

It takes time to learn … watch and learn what’s working and what isn’t and ask yourself why different posts work better than others

Shared a post on LinkedIn today about how to write your personal bio

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-write-memorable-bio-brand-statement-stands-out-meg-delagrange/

Who are you – Who is your audience – Who does your brand benefit >> Brand statement

If you are having trouble describing who you are – write out a bunch of things about yourself and then pick the ones that stand out to you

What’s the value in people knowing you, what’s your ‘thing’?

  • Meg was born Amish, she’s a single mom… she hopes she brings a bit of grittiness and honesty to her brand

There are so many facets of us as people, that spinning out a giant, generic ‘elevator pitch’ just comes off sounding unnatural

You’re bigger than your job and the tools you use to do your job – what makes you who you are?

Be careful of ‘elevator pitches’ – don’t use jargon that doesn’t resonate, use words that makes sense and that are true to who you are

How do you fight against the system and go against the tide? If everyone is doing something a certain way, and the same way – how do you break that mold?

It starts with the knowledge of who you are and then you start to build a culture around that. Pick something and start with it, you can change it up later and build on it – the truer you are to yourself, the more you are attracting the right kind of customers/people to you

You become so passionate about what it is that you’re doing that every part of you bleeds it

Everyday, you’re scrolling past the people you could be reaching and you’re trying to come up with smart, clever marketing to hook people… but it’s the real moments, the connection with people, that matter more than anything else

Urban Southern desperately needed a new website – they hired Alex Vasquez … they had many references, but they chose Alex because she met him at her 1st WordCamp and told her she was “a really intimidating but fascinating women” and it felt so cool and authentic and she remembered him – He had established a ‘moment’ with her

In the beginning Urban Southern had no engagement with their customers – they’ve worked on it a ton and now spend quite a bit of time connecting and replying and commenting

You need to make your social accounts & interactions something worth sticking around for

When she was with WannaPixel (??) they used a lot of clever social talk in the beginning but it wasn’t really connecting with people. On Colorado Gives Day – they would be really intentional about interacting with hashtags …. that day she went on their facebook and commented very specifically and intentionally on the people who were raising money – it made an impression and someone decided that day, they were going to use WannaPixel

If you’re starting and you have a young agency… plan to be in it for the long game, it takes work and it takes time to build a brand and to build up relationships – there is no “Growth Hack”

Being authentic vs. being rude

We all have challenging interactions with clients – if you can authentically but gracefully express the struggles you are dealing with (take time to process and calm yourself down first) – it can become a relatable lesson for your followers. Don’t make it super personal. Vent, but “vent with value!!”

Try to take the finger that you’re tempted to point at someone and turn it back to yourself and frame the issue around your response and what you learned from it – try to turn a negative experience positive

The painting on her wall (behind her on video) …if you look from afar, it’s interesting, but  if you go up close, there is still a whole world more to discover that’s interesting.  Think about that in your marketing

Did I do at least 2 things today to make an impact and move my business forward?

Everyone should have at least 3 ‘traction strategies’ going at a time (email newsletter, social media campaign, etc.)

45 sales in first year to over 3000 products sold this year… over 9000 people on email list

Read a book on Amazon called “Traction” … implement strategies and keep developing new ones.  Don’t stop the old ones, add to them! Layer your strategies. https://www.amazon.com/Traction-Startup-Achieve-Explosive-Customer-ebook/dp/B00TY3ZOMS/

Come up with your own unique ideas if you can – you can copy and see if that works for you, but originality stands out

The poppies in her painting – within the pod of one poppy there is an average of 10,000 – 60,000 seeds – they have the potential to create countless more poppies! All of us human beings are like that poppy flower, we have unlimited potential!!


Cool pick of the week

 


Show notes contributed by:

  • Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP93 – Unorthodox Marketing with Meg Delagrange appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Amish-born artist Meg Delagrange has always approached social media in an unorthodox way. She’s now in a venture of Design and Marketing at Urban Southern. This week on our show we’ll talk about taking an alternative approach to marketing can sometimes be the best play.

Bridget: “To me, the people that really stand out in marketing are the ones who do it a bit differently” (examples, Robert Nissenbaum, Rob Giles, Meg Delagrange)

Meg has a unique background that really stands out.  She’s helping to build a brand and can provide ‘unorthodox’ advice!  She puts a lot of her personality into her marketing.

How much of yourself should you put online?

  • Meg used to put almost everything online, but now that she knows herself better, she gives herself time to process first
  • There are guidelines … you may talk about dating, but best not to drop names – you have to know what is and isn’t okay to show …Ask yourself, “will this be valuable to someone else?”
  • You can share interesting/crazy stories that happen in your day, especially your mistakes – they can really resonate with people

Don’t be afraid to share benign / seemingly unrelated things about yourself (hobbies, etc) … they will give you more dimension

Started building her personal brand years ago (but wasn’t aware that she was at the time)

It takes time to learn … watch and learn what’s working and what isn’t and ask yourself why different posts work better than others

Shared a post on LinkedIn today about how to write your personal bio

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-write-memorable-bio-brand-statement-stands-out-meg-delagrange/

Who are you – Who is your audience – Who does your brand benefit >> Brand statement

If you are having trouble describing who you are – write out a bunch of things about yourself and then pick the ones that stand out to you

What’s the value in people knowing you, what’s your ‘thing’?

  • Meg was born Amish, she’s a single mom… she hopes she brings a bit of grittiness and honesty to her brand

There are so many facets of us as people, that spinning out a giant, generic ‘elevator pitch’ just comes off sounding unnatural

You’re bigger than your job and the tools you use to do your job – what makes you who you are?

Be careful of ‘elevator pitches’ – don’t use jargon that doesn’t resonate, use words that makes sense and that are true to who you are

How do you fight against the system and go against the tide? If everyone is doing something a certain way, and the same way – how do you break that mold?

It starts with the knowledge of who you are and then you start to build a culture around that. Pick something and start with it, you can change it up later and build on it – the truer you are to yourself, the more you are attracting the right kind of customers/people to you

You become so passionate about what it is that you’re doing that every part of you bleeds it

Everyday, you’re scrolling past the people you could be reaching and you’re trying to come up with smart, clever marketing to hook people… but it’s the real moments, the connection with people, that matter more than anything else

Urban Southern desperately needed a new website – they hired Alex Vasquez … they had many references, but they chose Alex because she met him at her 1st WordCamp and told her she was “a really intimidating but fascinating women” and it felt so cool and authentic and she remembered him – He had established a ‘moment’ with her

In the beginning Urban Southern had no engagement with their customers – they’ve worked on it a ton and now spend quite a bit of time connecting and replying and commenting

You need to make your social accounts & interactions something worth sticking around for

When she was with WannaPixel (??) they used a lot of clever social talk in the beginning but it wasn’t really connecting with people. On Colorado Gives Day – they would be really intentional about interacting with hashtags …. that day she went on their facebook and commented very specifically and intentionally on the people who were raising money – it made an impression and someone decided that day, they were going to use WannaPixel

If you’re starting and you have a young agency… plan to be in it for the long game, it takes work and it takes time to build a brand and to build up relationships – there is no “Growth Hack”

Being authentic vs. being rude

We all have challenging interactions with clients – if you can authentically but gracefully express the struggles you are dealing with (take time to process and calm yourself down first) – it can become a relatable lesson for your followers. Don’t make it super personal. Vent, but “vent with value!!”

Try to take the finger that you’re tempted to point at someone and turn it back to yourself and frame the issue around your response and what you learned from it – try to turn a negative experience positive

The painting on her wall (behind her on video) …if you look from afar, it’s interesting, but  if you go up close, there is still a whole world more to discover that’s interesting.  Think about that in your marketing

Did I do at least 2 things today to make an impact and move my business forward?

Everyone should have at least 3 ‘traction strategies’ going at a time (email newsletter, social media campaign, etc.)

45 sales in first year to over 3000 products sold this year… over 9000 people on email list

Read a book on Amazon called “Traction” … implement strategies and keep developing new ones.  Don’t stop the old ones, add to them! Layer your strategies. https://www.amazon.com/Traction-Startup-Achieve-Explosive-Customer-ebook/dp/B00TY3ZOMS/

Come up with your own unique ideas if you can – you can copy and see if that works for you, but originality stands out

The poppies in her painting – within the pod of one poppy there is an average of 10,000 – 60,000 seeds – they have the potential to create countless more poppies! All of us human beings are like that poppy flower, we have unlimited potential!!


Cool pick of the week

 


Show notes contributed by:

  • Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP93 – Unorthodox Marketing with Meg Delagrange appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP92 – Maintaining your personal brand while building another.]]> Fri, 26 Jan 2018 00:16:30 GMT 56:24 no

This week's guest Isaac Irvine, a personal branding expert, will talk to us about how we can balance the promotion of our employer's brand (or clients) without neglecting our own. Be sure to tune in for this show, which will be sure to have tweetable nuggets. Join the live chat for an opportunity to ask Issac your questions, too!

Isaac Irvine

@theisaac

https://isaacirvine.com/

Social and Community Manager at GoDaddy. I love talking about #PersonalBrand | #EmployeeAdvocacy | #StarWars. #Podcast host. Opinions are mine.

 

Bridget: Sometimes working for a brand is like a marriage – if you get divorced, then what becomes of your identity?

 

Shawn Pfunder told Isaac his personal brand is ‘cheerleader (for the company)… no one really knows what you’re about’ – he was devastated at the time, because he realized he didn’t have an identity outside of what his personal facebook friends saw

 

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/isaac-irvine-the-unexpected-personal-brand-coach_us_59371d69e4b04331b6694a4d

 

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dad-teaches-9-year-old-son-important-lesson-about-bullying/

 

Ask yourself “what do I really want to be known for” … talk about what you are passionate about! If it lines up with your brand, that’s great, but don’t hide who you are! Bridget: “Don’t be a paper doll.”

 

Sometimes we forget, as people, that it’s okay to talk about ourselves

 

A good place to start – Google yourself and see what comes up – ask if those are the things you want to be known for … if not, it might be time to start giving more attention to your personal brand

 

Think about a few things that you’re passionate about and make a list – then go from there, pick a few topics that float to the top and ask yourself “Can I come up with 10 articles/blog posts about this subject?”

For Isaac, the thing that stood out to him that he loved was ‘Star Wars’! He could come up with articles, videos, cosplay etc.. endlessly – it takes 0 effort for him to talk about it! If he is going to be authentic, he is going to talk about Star Wars and engage with others about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rB0wzy-xbwM

 

Naturally people will want to talk to you on social media about your job because they perceive you as an expert, but you need to remember to open up and be yourself too

 

If you run an agency/business, it’s a really good thing to have your employees active on social – if people are connected to your employees, then they are more likely to trust your business – because they trust their friends and their authenticity.

 

People can immediately tell if someone isn’t being authentic – you can’t fake that sort of thing. The more employees talk authentically about what they’re passionate about, the more it reflects positively on your brand.

 

If you want people to share your content… 1) make it good and worth sharing 2) be authentic

 

Don’t talk about your official job/roles too much on your social accounts, no more than 20% – talk about what makes you – YOU!  What are you interested in, what do you care about?  That’s what people need/want to see! Get comfortable sharing your stuff! Don’t self-censor so much that you’re no longer who you are.

 

His son started growing out his hair so he could donate it. He was having some trouble getting bullied at school.  Isaac asked him what was going on and asked him to talk about it – he only agreed when Isaac offered to record it and share it! (he loves the idea of becoming a popular YouTube video personality).  Isaac posted the video and didn’t think anyone would watch it, but the next morning, his phone was overflowing with notifications – the post went viral! Over 14,000 views in 8 hours!!! By that night, there were 2 news trucks outside to interview his son.  By the next day it was on CNN, Fox News and Yahoo! By the end of that week it was all over the globe.

 

A lot of people suggested he should start blogs / video series about bullying – there was the temptation to think “this is part of my brand now”.  But he’s not an expert on bullying – he’s not going to capitalize on that because it’s not authentic to his brand – it was a great parenting moment, but it’s not a passion of his.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dad-teaches-9-year-old-son-important-lesson-about-bullying/

 

When building your brand, ask yourself “is this something I can really carry forward – am I passionate enough about the subject to keep this going?”

 

A lot of people will give you advice about what you should share or how you should communicate – be sure to be true to your own brand – if it doesn’t feel right for you, don’t pursue it.

 

Isaac’s biggest advice is use what feels natural to you – don’t force it. Find the platform that works best for you. It doesn’t have to be Facebook or Twitter, etc…. If you’re comfortable with it and you’re engaging with your followers then stick with it.

 

Don’t be afraid to share who you are on LinkedIn too!  People may be following 100 other people in their industry and they are all posting/sharing the same things – if you post something different / unique – you stand out!

 

Jason’s dog instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lincydincydoo/

 

We live in a world where people change jobs on average every 2 years, so your personal brand matters more than ever!

 

Try asking yourself “If you could do anything – what is it that you’d really want to do?” Listen to that and pursue those passions, make that part of your personal brand

 

“Make your content so good that they want to share it!” – Isaac

 

“Find your tribe, hang out, and make yourself welcome!” – Isaac

 


Cool pick of the week

 

https://www.ILovePDF.com  – tools to help you do everything you need to do with your PDFs

https://Unsplash.com  – free stock photos for creative use / blogging, also have a wallpaper app

Instant Images plugin – One-click Unsplash images for your blog!

https://droplr.com/ – lets you capture and share instantly what’s on your screen

 

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP92 – Maintaining your personal brand while building another. appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week's guest Isaac Irvine, a personal branding expert, will talk to us about how we can balance the promotion of our employer's brand (or clients) without neglecting our own. Be sure to tune in for this show, which will be sure to have tweetable nuggets. Join the live chat for an opportunity to ask Issac your questions, too!

Isaac Irvine

@theisaac

https://isaacirvine.com/

Social and Community Manager at GoDaddy. I love talking about #PersonalBrand | #EmployeeAdvocacy | #StarWars. #Podcast host. Opinions are mine.

 

Bridget: Sometimes working for a brand is like a marriage – if you get divorced, then what becomes of your identity?

 

Shawn Pfunder told Isaac his personal brand is ‘cheerleader (for the company)… no one really knows what you’re about’ – he was devastated at the time, because he realized he didn’t have an identity outside of what his personal facebook friends saw

 

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/isaac-irvine-the-unexpected-personal-brand-coach_us_59371d69e4b04331b6694a4d

 

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dad-teaches-9-year-old-son-important-lesson-about-bullying/

 

Ask yourself “what do I really want to be known for” … talk about what you are passionate about! If it lines up with your brand, that’s great, but don’t hide who you are! Bridget: “Don’t be a paper doll.”

 

Sometimes we forget, as people, that it’s okay to talk about ourselves

 

A good place to start – Google yourself and see what comes up – ask if those are the things you want to be known for … if not, it might be time to start giving more attention to your personal brand

 

Think about a few things that you’re passionate about and make a list – then go from there, pick a few topics that float to the top and ask yourself “Can I come up with 10 articles/blog posts about this subject?”

For Isaac, the thing that stood out to him that he loved was ‘Star Wars’! He could come up with articles, videos, cosplay etc.. endlessly – it takes 0 effort for him to talk about it! If he is going to be authentic, he is going to talk about Star Wars and engage with others about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rB0wzy-xbwM

 

Naturally people will want to talk to you on social media about your job because they perceive you as an expert, but you need to remember to open up and be yourself too

 

If you run an agency/business, it’s a really good thing to have your employees active on social – if people are connected to your employees, then they are more likely to trust your business – because they trust their friends and their authenticity.

 

People can immediately tell if someone isn’t being authentic – you can’t fake that sort of thing. The more employees talk authentically about what they’re passionate about, the more it reflects positively on your brand.

 

If you want people to share your content… 1) make it good and worth sharing 2) be authentic

 

Don’t talk about your official job/roles too much on your social accounts, no more than 20% – talk about what makes you – YOU!  What are you interested in, what do you care about?  That’s what people need/want to see! Get comfortable sharing your stuff! Don’t self-censor so much that you’re no longer who you are.

 

His son started growing out his hair so he could donate it. He was having some trouble getting bullied at school.  Isaac asked him what was going on and asked him to talk about it – he only agreed when Isaac offered to record it and share it! (he loves the idea of becoming a popular YouTube video personality).  Isaac posted the video and didn’t think anyone would watch it, but the next morning, his phone was overflowing with notifications – the post went viral! Over 14,000 views in 8 hours!!! By that night, there were 2 news trucks outside to interview his son.  By the next day it was on CNN, Fox News and Yahoo! By the end of that week it was all over the globe.

 

A lot of people suggested he should start blogs / video series about bullying – there was the temptation to think “this is part of my brand now”.  But he’s not an expert on bullying – he’s not going to capitalize on that because it’s not authentic to his brand – it was a great parenting moment, but it’s not a passion of his.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dad-teaches-9-year-old-son-important-lesson-about-bullying/

 

When building your brand, ask yourself “is this something I can really carry forward – am I passionate enough about the subject to keep this going?”

 

A lot of people will give you advice about what you should share or how you should communicate – be sure to be true to your own brand – if it doesn’t feel right for you, don’t pursue it.

 

Isaac’s biggest advice is use what feels natural to you – don’t force it. Find the platform that works best for you. It doesn’t have to be Facebook or Twitter, etc…. If you’re comfortable with it and you’re engaging with your followers then stick with it.

 

Don’t be afraid to share who you are on LinkedIn too!  People may be following 100 other people in their industry and they are all posting/sharing the same things – if you post something different / unique – you stand out!

 

Jason’s dog instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lincydincydoo/

 

We live in a world where people change jobs on average every 2 years, so your personal brand matters more than ever!

 

Try asking yourself “If you could do anything – what is it that you’d really want to do?” Listen to that and pursue those passions, make that part of your personal brand

 

“Make your content so good that they want to share it!” – Isaac

 

“Find your tribe, hang out, and make yourself welcome!” – Isaac

 


Cool pick of the week

 

https://www.ILovePDF.com  – tools to help you do everything you need to do with your PDFs

https://Unsplash.com  – free stock photos for creative use / blogging, also have a wallpaper app

Instant Images plugin – One-click Unsplash images for your blog!

https://droplr.com/ – lets you capture and share instantly what’s on your screen

 

Show notes contributed by:

The post WPblab EP92 – Maintaining your personal brand while building another. appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP91 – Marketing Gutenberg: Awareness & Education]]> Thu, 18 Jan 2018 20:10:08 GMT 56:35 no

Iteration is exciting and Jason and Bridget are definitely stoked about the new way you’ll interact with WordPress with Gutenberg. Let’s chat about marketing to clients and the WordPress Community, managing change and budgets.

Gutenberg Tour by Bridget Willard

Tour of Gutenberg – Women Who WP – January 17, 2018

What is Gutenberg?
WordPress Plugins

“ Gutenberg is more than an editor. While the editor is the focus right now, the project will ultimately impact the entire publishing experience including customization (the next focus area).”

Discover more about the project.

State of the Word, 2017

Morten Rand-Hendriksen

Gutenberg Hangbook Reference FAQ

How can I send feedback or get help with a bug?

WordPress/gutenberg

A way to disable Gutenberg editor in code? #4409?

Issue #4409

How can I contribute?
gutenberg/CONTRIBUTING.md at master

Gutenberg Theme

Showcasing Gutenberg:a theme to show the potential

wordpress.org ^ the theme in use.

A minimum Gutenberg Theme – Theme Directory

When will it be out?
Slated to be part of core in WordPress 5.0 (Currently available as a plugin in the repo)

WordPress Plugins

Bridget’s Marketing Plan

Freeze Development, build an RC and give everyone a solid 2 months to update content. Make things compatible.

All lynda.com, WP Beginner and all that old 4.9 and before WP content will now be outdated.

Give the community 2-3 months to catch up before releasing it.

WordPress 5.0 Development Cycle – Make WordPress Core

Cool pick of the week

Set Up Persistence with DevTools Workspaces  |  Tools for Web Developers  |  Google Developers

 

Show notes contributed by:

Greg Shaw – @greg1usa

James Tryon – @JamesTryon

The post WPblab EP91 – Marketing Gutenberg: Awareness & Education appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Iteration is exciting and Jason and Bridget are definitely stoked about the new way you’ll interact with WordPress with Gutenberg. Let’s chat about marketing to clients and the WordPress Community, managing change and budgets.

Gutenberg Tour by Bridget Willard

Tour of Gutenberg – Women Who WP – January 17, 2018

What is Gutenberg?
WordPress Plugins

“ Gutenberg is more than an editor. While the editor is the focus right now, the project will ultimately impact the entire publishing experience including customization (the next focus area).”

Discover more about the project.

State of the Word, 2017

Morten Rand-Hendriksen

Gutenberg Hangbook Reference FAQ

How can I send feedback or get help with a bug?

WordPress/gutenberg

A way to disable Gutenberg editor in code? #4409?

Issue #4409

How can I contribute?
gutenberg/CONTRIBUTING.md at master

Gutenberg Theme

Showcasing Gutenberg:a theme to show the potential

wordpress.org ^ the theme in use.

A minimum Gutenberg Theme – Theme Directory

When will it be out?
Slated to be part of core in WordPress 5.0 (Currently available as a plugin in the repo)

WordPress Plugins

Bridget’s Marketing Plan

Freeze Development, build an RC and give everyone a solid 2 months to update content. Make things compatible.

All lynda.com, WP Beginner and all that old 4.9 and before WP content will now be outdated.

Give the community 2-3 months to catch up before releasing it.

WordPress 5.0 Development Cycle – Make WordPress Core

Cool pick of the week

Set Up Persistence with DevTools Workspaces  |  Tools for Web Developers  |  Google Developers

 

Show notes contributed by:

Greg Shaw – @greg1usa

James Tryon – @JamesTryon

The post WPblab EP91 – Marketing Gutenberg: Awareness & Education appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP90 – Just Create January – An Incubator and Accountability Group]]> Thu, 04 Jan 2018 05:37:44 GMT 1:00:51 no

New Year presents new goals and new opportunities to either make them or fail. It can go either way, so with our community, we thought we'd do what community does: support one another. This is why Jason created “Just Create January.” Every day of this month in our Facebook group, we have an opportunity to be accountable, share, and even brainstorm with one another. On this week's show, we'll chat about the motivation and results so far and what we'd like to see from all of us in 2018.

BridgetWillard.com | Gutenbridget.com

JasonTucker.blog

There are lots of accountability & challenge groups that start at the beginning of the year; Jason and Bridget thought it would be a great idea to create something like that for marketers/creators

Jason joined a blogging group – they would provide a prompt and members would write about it each day.

#JustCreateJanuary was started to help encourage ‘creation’ of all kinds – blogging, design, video, web, etc. They didn’t start it to build a community – the WPblab community already exists – they did it so we all can create and encourage each other.  It’s different from other challenges because we are already all connected.

Sometimes you just need another person to say that should be a blog post or that should be a video, etc.

Using Facebook to manage the challenge since everyone uses Facebook – one post per day in the group (at 5am) will encourage group members to participate

Submit your creations to the group each day and then others can comment and share and encourage you

https://www.facebook.com/ThingDotDo/

Talking with other people in a group and brainstorming together can help you realize that you have something to share.  The point is to ‘do something’!

Sometimes you just get in a rut, but as you share and talk it out with each other, it can make creation easier

https://lorennason.com/category/create/ – Loren Nason’s curation of the responses to the #JustCreateJanuary challenge

There’s a vulnerability involved with creating – it’s yours and it comes from who you are (very personal). It’s nice to have a place where you feel psychologically safe to share your content with before posting.

Ways of Sharing Content

  • Share a Draft Plugin – https://wordpress.org/plugins/shareadraft/ “share a draft with your friends or colleagues for either review or approval.” – you can also set it so the link expires after some time
  • www.Dribbble.com | www.Behance.net (Adobe) – designers share & get inspiration from each other
  • Better Click to Tweet – https://wordpress.org/plugins/better-click-to-tweet/ – allows you to easily create tweetable content for your readers. Using a shortcode, your selected text is highlighted and made tweetable.
  • https://codepen.io and https://github.com for sharing code (or just post it on your blog)
  • Make a private board on pinterest and only share it with people that you choose, and make public later. Or, if you don’t want to share on a public site like Dribbble, CodePen, GitHub – share it on your personal website

It can be intimidating to post on sites where other designers / developers can see your work, but it’s a great way to improve your skills and show how far you’ve come

Another option is to share on #JustCreateJanuary and get feedback from a smaller community or message one of the members for feedback/advice

It’s fun to experiment and remember why we’re creators and why we do what we do – we’re all makers!

Sharing with the group can help build confidence by seeing and commenting on each other’s work in a safe space, where you can get feedback and encouragement

At the end of the day, WPblab is about people who are trying to market themselves, market their customers – #JustCreateJanuary is an extension of that

Bridget’s first GitHub repo was about women’s shirt sizes (and inconsistency) at conventions – it’s not just for code.  Anyone can comment on repo’s – it’s like commenting on a blog.

#JustCreateJanuary can help keep you out of the ‘rut’!

Go ahead and write something on a piece of paper and share it to the group – all creation is encouraged! Choose whatever medium works best for you!  It can just be code .. it can just be the start of a blog post … or if it’s something private for a client, you can just say what you are working on, even if you can’t share it


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

  • Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂
  • Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂
  • James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP90 – Just Create January – An Incubator and Accountability Group appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

New Year presents new goals and new opportunities to either make them or fail. It can go either way, so with our community, we thought we'd do what community does: support one another. This is why Jason created “Just Create January.” Every day of this month in our Facebook group, we have an opportunity to be accountable, share, and even brainstorm with one another. On this week's show, we'll chat about the motivation and results so far and what we'd like to see from all of us in 2018.

BridgetWillard.com | Gutenbridget.com

JasonTucker.blog

There are lots of accountability & challenge groups that start at the beginning of the year; Jason and Bridget thought it would be a great idea to create something like that for marketers/creators

Jason joined a blogging group – they would provide a prompt and members would write about it each day.

#JustCreateJanuary was started to help encourage ‘creation’ of all kinds – blogging, design, video, web, etc. They didn’t start it to build a community – the WPblab community already exists – they did it so we all can create and encourage each other.  It’s different from other challenges because we are already all connected.

Sometimes you just need another person to say that should be a blog post or that should be a video, etc.

Using Facebook to manage the challenge since everyone uses Facebook – one post per day in the group (at 5am) will encourage group members to participate

Submit your creations to the group each day and then others can comment and share and encourage you

https://www.facebook.com/ThingDotDo/

Talking with other people in a group and brainstorming together can help you realize that you have something to share.  The point is to ‘do something’!

Sometimes you just get in a rut, but as you share and talk it out with each other, it can make creation easier

https://lorennason.com/category/create/ – Loren Nason’s curation of the responses to the #JustCreateJanuary challenge

There’s a vulnerability involved with creating – it’s yours and it comes from who you are (very personal). It’s nice to have a place where you feel psychologically safe to share your content with before posting.

Ways of Sharing Content

  • Share a Draft Plugin – https://wordpress.org/plugins/shareadraft/ “share a draft with your friends or colleagues for either review or approval.” – you can also set it so the link expires after some time
  • www.Dribbble.com | www.Behance.net (Adobe) – designers share & get inspiration from each other
  • Better Click to Tweet – https://wordpress.org/plugins/better-click-to-tweet/ – allows you to easily create tweetable content for your readers. Using a shortcode, your selected text is highlighted and made tweetable.
  • https://codepen.io and https://github.com for sharing code (or just post it on your blog)
  • Make a private board on pinterest and only share it with people that you choose, and make public later. Or, if you don’t want to share on a public site like Dribbble, CodePen, GitHub – share it on your personal website

It can be intimidating to post on sites where other designers / developers can see your work, but it’s a great way to improve your skills and show how far you’ve come

Another option is to share on #JustCreateJanuary and get feedback from a smaller community or message one of the members for feedback/advice

It’s fun to experiment and remember why we’re creators and why we do what we do – we’re all makers!

Sharing with the group can help build confidence by seeing and commenting on each other’s work in a safe space, where you can get feedback and encouragement

At the end of the day, WPblab is about people who are trying to market themselves, market their customers – #JustCreateJanuary is an extension of that

Bridget’s first GitHub repo was about women’s shirt sizes (and inconsistency) at conventions – it’s not just for code.  Anyone can comment on repo’s – it’s like commenting on a blog.

#JustCreateJanuary can help keep you out of the ‘rut’!

Go ahead and write something on a piece of paper and share it to the group – all creation is encouraged! Choose whatever medium works best for you!  It can just be code .. it can just be the start of a blog post … or if it’s something private for a client, you can just say what you are working on, even if you can’t share it


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

  • Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂
  • Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂
  • James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP90 – Just Create January – An Incubator and Accountability Group appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP89 – Marketing Around The Holidays: A Conversation]]> Wed, 20 Dec 2017 00:07:17 GMT 59:21 no

Some businesses take a break, others avoid celebrating any specific day. With our increasingly diverse and global economy, how do you handle marketing around the holidays?

BridgetWillard.com | Gutenbridget.com

JasonTucker.blog

Hashtags are your friend! Use as many as you can! There are many different holidays occurring this time of year.

Know who your clients are (or who your audience is) – it may be winter here in the Northern Hemisphere but it’s summer south of the Equator

Respect your unique culture – what makes sense for you/your business – your brand should be a reflection of your collective personality

Scheduling during the Holidays:

  • Be careful with automation … you may schedule something that posts at a really inappropriate time
  • Either schedule and respond, or don’t schedule and choose to ‘go dark’ instead (many businesses choose to close between Christmas and New Year’s), but communicate either way

 

Buffer example: https://twitter.com/joelgascoigne/status/943024640473030657

Oftentimes, social media is the last recourse for people looking for support – tweeting shows that you are available.  If you aren’t there to actually respond, you shouldn’t have automated tweets going out

The trick to scheduling is to make it look like your tweets aren’t scheduled

Make use of the social platforms that make sense for your demographic – if you know that your customers/users use Facebook far more than Twitter, focus heavy marketing efforts on that platform

Don’t miss out on using Facebook Events to help promote … if someone likes or shows interest in your event, it will show in their friend’s notifications and help promote it further.  Also, Facebook will show users events happening in their area and they are searchable!

When you tell your fans to like your event, make sure you also ask them to invite their friends to join them!

Another bonus – When people take photos at your event, Facebook will also ask them if they want to share their images to your page/event!

At the holidays, don’t worry about blasting out a lot of information – there is so much going on, it’s easy for people to miss things

https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

Holidays are all about love and belonging – if you can tap into that, and help your customer feel ‘that’ – your brand is winning

For email marketing, make sure to let your customers know early and often about shipping deadlines for the Holidays (standard mail, priority mail, express, etc.)

You can create your own holidays / events – but be sure to promote them properly, just as you would with any other event

Come up with creative ways to get people to buy – Old Navy: “don’t need it by Christmas, pick slower shipping and we’ll donate $1 to charity”

If you understand your audience and what matters to them, communicate those shared values to them through your marketing and it will have a much greater impact

Whatever your marketing is throughout the year, your marketing during the holidays should just be an amplification of that – you shouldn’t change your company’s message just to get attention

Instagram is no longer in chronological order so it’s not the best for promoting time-sensitive deals, it’s better for the soft sell … one good example: https://www.instagram.com/campbowwow/

Be careful with big cultural holidays that are ‘like’ standard holidays in size and scope, but more commercial (such as the SuperBowl) – many words and phrases are trademarked and can’t be used in your marketing – you may need to get creative with your phrasing!

Also, remember your culture and your brand – don’t advertise for a cultural/commercial holiday that doesn’t make sense for who you are.

Don’t forget to make use of Snapchat, and custom Snapchat filters – if your customers post images with your custom filter, it will give them the option to share to your company ‘story’ on Snapchat

A great way to get user-generated content/participation is to ask fans to submit their best photos/videos (using branded filters) etc. and offer something in return – a great example is ElfYourself from Office Depot which started as a marketing campaign and has become a cultural norm and tradition

“Merry Kiss Me” arch at Dana Point Holiday Lights – they created a contest to get people to take and share their photos taken there

Plan your marketing early (September at the latest) and build it up slowly as you approach the holidays – use a broad approach – everything in your social media arsenal. (maybe also remind your users to keep their accounts public .. private account content is locked down and unavailable for sharing)

You don’t want your ads to feel like ads – make them so good and so relatable – that people share them and retweet them just like they would a friends tweet!

Big Takeaway: User-generated content is the way to win at holiday marketing!


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂

James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP89 – Marketing Around The Holidays: A Conversation appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Some businesses take a break, others avoid celebrating any specific day. With our increasingly diverse and global economy, how do you handle marketing around the holidays?

BridgetWillard.com | Gutenbridget.com

JasonTucker.blog

Hashtags are your friend! Use as many as you can! There are many different holidays occurring this time of year.

Know who your clients are (or who your audience is) – it may be winter here in the Northern Hemisphere but it’s summer south of the Equator

Respect your unique culture – what makes sense for you/your business – your brand should be a reflection of your collective personality

Scheduling during the Holidays:

  • Be careful with automation … you may schedule something that posts at a really inappropriate time
  • Either schedule and respond, or don’t schedule and choose to ‘go dark’ instead (many businesses choose to close between Christmas and New Year’s), but communicate either way

 

Buffer example: https://twitter.com/joelgascoigne/status/943024640473030657

Oftentimes, social media is the last recourse for people looking for support – tweeting shows that you are available.  If you aren’t there to actually respond, you shouldn’t have automated tweets going out

The trick to scheduling is to make it look like your tweets aren’t scheduled

Make use of the social platforms that make sense for your demographic – if you know that your customers/users use Facebook far more than Twitter, focus heavy marketing efforts on that platform

Don’t miss out on using Facebook Events to help promote … if someone likes or shows interest in your event, it will show in their friend’s notifications and help promote it further.  Also, Facebook will show users events happening in their area and they are searchable!

When you tell your fans to like your event, make sure you also ask them to invite their friends to join them!

Another bonus – When people take photos at your event, Facebook will also ask them if they want to share their images to your page/event!

At the holidays, don’t worry about blasting out a lot of information – there is so much going on, it’s easy for people to miss things

https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

Holidays are all about love and belonging – if you can tap into that, and help your customer feel ‘that’ – your brand is winning

For email marketing, make sure to let your customers know early and often about shipping deadlines for the Holidays (standard mail, priority mail, express, etc.)

You can create your own holidays / events – but be sure to promote them properly, just as you would with any other event

Come up with creative ways to get people to buy – Old Navy: “don’t need it by Christmas, pick slower shipping and we’ll donate $1 to charity”

If you understand your audience and what matters to them, communicate those shared values to them through your marketing and it will have a much greater impact

Whatever your marketing is throughout the year, your marketing during the holidays should just be an amplification of that – you shouldn’t change your company’s message just to get attention

Instagram is no longer in chronological order so it’s not the best for promoting time-sensitive deals, it’s better for the soft sell … one good example: https://www.instagram.com/campbowwow/

Be careful with big cultural holidays that are ‘like’ standard holidays in size and scope, but more commercial (such as the SuperBowl) – many words and phrases are trademarked and can’t be used in your marketing – you may need to get creative with your phrasing!

Also, remember your culture and your brand – don’t advertise for a cultural/commercial holiday that doesn’t make sense for who you are.

Don’t forget to make use of Snapchat, and custom Snapchat filters – if your customers post images with your custom filter, it will give them the option to share to your company ‘story’ on Snapchat

A great way to get user-generated content/participation is to ask fans to submit their best photos/videos (using branded filters) etc. and offer something in return – a great example is ElfYourself from Office Depot which started as a marketing campaign and has become a cultural norm and tradition

“Merry Kiss Me” arch at Dana Point Holiday Lights – they created a contest to get people to take and share their photos taken there

Plan your marketing early (September at the latest) and build it up slowly as you approach the holidays – use a broad approach – everything in your social media arsenal. (maybe also remind your users to keep their accounts public .. private account content is locked down and unavailable for sharing)

You don’t want your ads to feel like ads – make them so good and so relatable – that people share them and retweet them just like they would a friends tweet!

Big Takeaway: User-generated content is the way to win at holiday marketing!


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂

James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP89 – Marketing Around The Holidays: A Conversation appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP88 – Content Marketing: How you share makes the difference]]> Tue, 14 Nov 2017 20:51:51 GMT 58:56 no

You wrote something. Now what? You can automate. You can schedule. What works best? How do you start? In this episode, Jason and Bridget will give their tips and tricks to help get you going.

Jason Tucker and his 12-yr-old daughter Jessalyn ( https://jessalyn.blog/) will be attending WCUS together for the first time! (https://jasontucker.blog/10107/wordcamp-us-2017-eyes-12-year-old)

WomenWhoWP will have a booth at the WCUS Community Bazaar! – Bridget will be there, say hi!

Sharing and content management go hand-in-hand – whatever info you put into that CMS you are going to need to share – to get your story out there!

Too many of us have a “shoeless joe” approach of “if we build it they will come” – it doesn’t work that way in real life – you need to be intentional

When blogging (and communicating on social) your voice and tonality need to match – that’s what makes you authentic.  Don’t use authenticity as an excuse to be a jerk though!  How you treat your audience matters.

Automation can be a problem – it can lack authenticity, you need to pay careful attention to what is being shared/posted – does it match your tone / your voice?  Example: a politician that has a search that auto-posts any tweets mentioning her name (with no oversight!) … even bad tweets got retweeted!  Or another example is if someone has automation and they’ve passed away.

Automating is not a bad thing if it’s authentic to who you are (i.e. if you’re a programmer/coder, etc.)

Only 2 things automated on BridgetWillard.com – Postmatic (for commenting) and Revive Old Posts (auto tweets her own articles in a specified time period). Bridget believes in a hybrid solution of automation and hand-edited posts.

Another option (though controversial!) is to take advantage of the bots that auto-retweet hashtags of interest to your audience! The risk is that many people won’t follow them because the account is obviously a bot!

If Bridget really likes an article, she’ll pull a sentence and share it on social media, and then choose another sentence and share it on a different platform, etc. (twitter, facebook, linkedin…)

Bridget would love if Revive Old Posts would make a meta box with alternate titles so it could reshare the same content with different text!

Scheduling posts can be helpful too – can also rearrange your info for repeat posts manually.

Better Click to Tweet plugin – helps you pull out quotes

Each social media platform has it’s own culture, you need to tailor your posts to that platform and not post the same thing on all of them

Setting automation is not a bad thing if it’s in a controlled environment – if you have it set to pull from your own content or from sites that are trusted.

MashShare https://wordpress.org/plugins/mashsharer/ – social media share buttons

There’s nothing wrong with clicking your own buttons/links!  Go ahead and click the share buttons on your blog posts – half of what Bridget built into her site was for her own use, to make it easier to share her content!

How you share means the “full context” or the “30,000 ft view”

When you’re sharing content, don’t forget to also share other people’s content – it shows that you care about more than just yourself, and encourages others to share your content (don’t live in a vacuum)

Pay attention to what people are saying about your brand and leverage it!  Rachel Cherry posted she had “tattoo-level” love for Slack HQ and they caught wind of it and created an ad around it!  Rachel Cherry https://twitter.com/ruder/status/676165067549900800

When you are sharing content multiple times, try reframing how you present it – say it in a different way to catch a new audience.

Gary Vaynerchuk makes content for Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, etc. that’s similar but different enough that it works best for each platform

Tailor your content for your audience!  When you are traveling to a different country or city, like Paris, you behave differently because of what the ‘natives’ expect.  Think the same way with your content.  If you sharing on twitter, post one way, on facebook, post another way. The same content presentation does not work for all audiences and you run the risk of fatiguing them!

Carol Stephen: http://yoursocialmediaworks.com/social-media-different-platform-different-language

Swipeable on the iOS App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/swipeable-instagram-panorama/id1209900326?mt=8

Instagram is not for memes – they’re really best on facebook!

Snapchat is a bit more casual/natural – don’t need to be as polished

Just start somewhere – start with one platform and use it for a few minutes each day.  When you get used to it, add another platform and go from there!

Don’t try to imitate the biggest person on social media that you can find – 9 times out of 10, they have a team behind their account and you’ll run yourself ragged trying to catch up

There is no crazy secret to getting a lot of followers – be kind, be polite, be conversational, be interested.  Reply to people! What would you say to people if you were having a conversation in person? Build relationships!  From relationships come referrals 😉 Win-win!

 


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl https://merrymintdesigns.com/

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP88 – Content Marketing: How you share makes the difference appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

You wrote something. Now what? You can automate. You can schedule. What works best? How do you start? In this episode, Jason and Bridget will give their tips and tricks to help get you going.

Jason Tucker and his 12-yr-old daughter Jessalyn ( https://jessalyn.blog/) will be attending WCUS together for the first time! (https://jasontucker.blog/10107/wordcamp-us-2017-eyes-12-year-old)

WomenWhoWP will have a booth at the WCUS Community Bazaar! – Bridget will be there, say hi!

Sharing and content management go hand-in-hand – whatever info you put into that CMS you are going to need to share – to get your story out there!

Too many of us have a “shoeless joe” approach of “if we build it they will come” – it doesn’t work that way in real life – you need to be intentional

When blogging (and communicating on social) your voice and tonality need to match – that’s what makes you authentic.  Don’t use authenticity as an excuse to be a jerk though!  How you treat your audience matters.

Automation can be a problem – it can lack authenticity, you need to pay careful attention to what is being shared/posted – does it match your tone / your voice?  Example: a politician that has a search that auto-posts any tweets mentioning her name (with no oversight!) … even bad tweets got retweeted!  Or another example is if someone has automation and they’ve passed away.

Automating is not a bad thing if it’s authentic to who you are (i.e. if you’re a programmer/coder, etc.)

Only 2 things automated on BridgetWillard.com – Postmatic (for commenting) and Revive Old Posts (auto tweets her own articles in a specified time period). Bridget believes in a hybrid solution of automation and hand-edited posts.

Another option (though controversial!) is to take advantage of the bots that auto-retweet hashtags of interest to your audience! The risk is that many people won’t follow them because the account is obviously a bot!

If Bridget really likes an article, she’ll pull a sentence and share it on social media, and then choose another sentence and share it on a different platform, etc. (twitter, facebook, linkedin…)

Bridget would love if Revive Old Posts would make a meta box with alternate titles so it could reshare the same content with different text!

Scheduling posts can be helpful too – can also rearrange your info for repeat posts manually.

Better Click to Tweet plugin – helps you pull out quotes

Each social media platform has it’s own culture, you need to tailor your posts to that platform and not post the same thing on all of them

Setting automation is not a bad thing if it’s in a controlled environment – if you have it set to pull from your own content or from sites that are trusted.

MashShare https://wordpress.org/plugins/mashsharer/ – social media share buttons

There’s nothing wrong with clicking your own buttons/links!  Go ahead and click the share buttons on your blog posts – half of what Bridget built into her site was for her own use, to make it easier to share her content!

How you share means the “full context” or the “30,000 ft view”

When you’re sharing content, don’t forget to also share other people’s content – it shows that you care about more than just yourself, and encourages others to share your content (don’t live in a vacuum)

Pay attention to what people are saying about your brand and leverage it!  Rachel Cherry posted she had “tattoo-level” love for Slack HQ and they caught wind of it and created an ad around it!  Rachel Cherry https://twitter.com/ruder/status/676165067549900800

When you are sharing content multiple times, try reframing how you present it – say it in a different way to catch a new audience.

Gary Vaynerchuk makes content for Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, etc. that’s similar but different enough that it works best for each platform

Tailor your content for your audience!  When you are traveling to a different country or city, like Paris, you behave differently because of what the ‘natives’ expect.  Think the same way with your content.  If you sharing on twitter, post one way, on facebook, post another way. The same content presentation does not work for all audiences and you run the risk of fatiguing them!

Carol Stephen: http://yoursocialmediaworks.com/social-media-different-platform-different-language

Swipeable on the iOS App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/swipeable-instagram-panorama/id1209900326?mt=8

Instagram is not for memes – they’re really best on facebook!

Snapchat is a bit more casual/natural – don’t need to be as polished

Just start somewhere – start with one platform and use it for a few minutes each day.  When you get used to it, add another platform and go from there!

Don’t try to imitate the biggest person on social media that you can find – 9 times out of 10, they have a team behind their account and you’ll run yourself ragged trying to catch up

There is no crazy secret to getting a lot of followers – be kind, be polite, be conversational, be interested.  Reply to people! What would you say to people if you were having a conversation in person? Build relationships!  From relationships come referrals 😉 Win-win!

 


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl https://merrymintdesigns.com/

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP88 – Content Marketing: How you share makes the difference appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP87 – A Look Backward in Time]]> Mon, 30 Oct 2017 20:44:36 GMT 59:35 no

In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard, along with you in the chat room, will reminisce on the show, the community, technology, and even their own careers. We'd love to have you join in.

Celebrating Two Years!!

Late September 2015 – Bridget was working as an office manager for a construction company.  Jason said there was a new video / chat platform called Blab.im and decided he wanted to give it a try and suggested Bridget join him!

Bridget said “I don’t know anything about WordPress” and Jason said “That’s why I want you to do the show!”

Started as a 90 minute show and has since been trimmed back to an hour

Blab.im allowed anyone to pop in as a random guest during the show and they had guests from countries all over

Was originally just a WordPress focused show, so any topic around WordPress was fair game, has since evolved to focus on WordPress marketing and social media

Just as Jason was starting to get tired of / annoyed with Blab.im … it went away! It was the perfect time to try a new platform – tried Firetalk and eventually landed on Google / YouTube

Jason has been using Google Hangouts for about 5 years, so decided to keep using the platform for WPBlab

Having a show whose content is totally dependant on people showing up and asking questions proved very challenging, so moving to have a set topic with guests just made sense

Originally almost felt like a virtual meetup, where the audience was heavily involved in the content of each show

Bridget will be appearing in the Women Who WordPress panel at WordCamp Seattle this weekend (as a freelancer). She will also appear at WordCamp Rochester and will be at WCUS for Contributor Day with the Marketing team.

Both Jason and Bridget have switched jobs since starting and Bridget is now freelancing.  Bridget has also now travelled to two different countries!

Started ‘Community Connections’ spin-off this year with Bridget Willard and Jen Miller – highlighting members of the WordPress community

Where do Jason & Bridget want to be in the next 2 years?

  • Bridget hopes her life is personally and professionally drastically different! She also hopes she’s seen Iceland and learned how to do something WordPressy, like make a plugin!  She hopes she finally understands DNS
  • Jason is looking forward to some big new projects at work

Where did you think you’d be now, 20 years ago? Are you there, did you surpass it, fail to meet it?

  • Bridget – I’ve exceeded my college education, but I don’t believe in 10, 20-year plans – when you meet people and experience things, your goals/dreams keep changing! “The more you experience in your life, the more your dreams change!”
  • Jason – knew he’d be married and have a couple kids and be doing the kind of nerdy stuff he does! He’s happy with where he’s ended up and enjoys doing the podcasts and keeping up with his friends without having to be in the same room

 

The coolest thing Bridget has learned is that she can do whatever she wants to do and succeed if she sets her mind to it, and her friends believe that she can


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP87 – A Look Backward in Time appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard, along with you in the chat room, will reminisce on the show, the community, technology, and even their own careers. We'd love to have you join in.

Celebrating Two Years!!

Late September 2015 – Bridget was working as an office manager for a construction company.  Jason said there was a new video / chat platform called Blab.im and decided he wanted to give it a try and suggested Bridget join him!

Bridget said “I don’t know anything about WordPress” and Jason said “That’s why I want you to do the show!”

Started as a 90 minute show and has since been trimmed back to an hour

Blab.im allowed anyone to pop in as a random guest during the show and they had guests from countries all over

Was originally just a WordPress focused show, so any topic around WordPress was fair game, has since evolved to focus on WordPress marketing and social media

Just as Jason was starting to get tired of / annoyed with Blab.im … it went away! It was the perfect time to try a new platform – tried Firetalk and eventually landed on Google / YouTube

Jason has been using Google Hangouts for about 5 years, so decided to keep using the platform for WPBlab

Having a show whose content is totally dependant on people showing up and asking questions proved very challenging, so moving to have a set topic with guests just made sense

Originally almost felt like a virtual meetup, where the audience was heavily involved in the content of each show

Bridget will be appearing in the Women Who WordPress panel at WordCamp Seattle this weekend (as a freelancer). She will also appear at WordCamp Rochester and will be at WCUS for Contributor Day with the Marketing team.

Both Jason and Bridget have switched jobs since starting and Bridget is now freelancing.  Bridget has also now travelled to two different countries!

Started ‘Community Connections’ spin-off this year with Bridget Willard and Jen Miller – highlighting members of the WordPress community

Where do Jason & Bridget want to be in the next 2 years?

  • Bridget hopes her life is personally and professionally drastically different! She also hopes she’s seen Iceland and learned how to do something WordPressy, like make a plugin!  She hopes she finally understands DNS
  • Jason is looking forward to some big new projects at work

Where did you think you’d be now, 20 years ago? Are you there, did you surpass it, fail to meet it?

  • Bridget – I’ve exceeded my college education, but I don’t believe in 10, 20-year plans – when you meet people and experience things, your goals/dreams keep changing! “The more you experience in your life, the more your dreams change!”
  • Jason – knew he’d be married and have a couple kids and be doing the kind of nerdy stuff he does! He’s happy with where he’s ended up and enjoys doing the podcasts and keeping up with his friends without having to be in the same room

 

The coolest thing Bridget has learned is that she can do whatever she wants to do and succeed if she sets her mind to it, and her friends believe that she can


Show notes contributed by:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP87 – A Look Backward in Time appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP86 – Creating Community at WordCamp w/ Adam Silver #WCLAX]]> Thu, 05 Oct 2017 16:26:09 GMT 1:03:25 no

This week Bridget Willard and Jen Miller speak with Adam Silver, Lead Organizer of #WCLAX on Creating Community at WordCamp

The post WPblab EP86 – Creating Community at WordCamp w/ Adam Silver #WCLAX appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week Bridget Willard and Jen Miller speak with Adam Silver, Lead Organizer of #WCLAX on Creating Community at WordCamp

The post WPblab EP86 – Creating Community at WordCamp w/ Adam Silver #WCLAX appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP85 – CoBranding Your WordPress Product]]> Thu, 28 Sep 2017 21:09:08 GMT 1:02:00 no

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Josh Pollock. We’ll discuss the pros and cons of co-branding your WordPress products.

Josh Pollock – Caldera Labs – Caldera Forms – Caldera

@Josh412, @calderaforms, @CalderaWP, or @CalderaLearn  #catdera

http://calderawp.com, http://calderalabs.org/, https://calderaforms.com/, & https://learn.calderalabs.org/

Co-branding is when you leverage the audience of two different brands by teaming up together to help elevate both brands or gain a new audience segment. (Like the Eddie Bauer Ford Explorer)

Caldera and Give did a co-branding with a tutorial on using Caldera Forms to submit a fundraising campaign
“Create a Peer-to-Peer Give Campaign with Caldera Forms” –  http://bit.ly/2vdvrxH

Caldera & Aspen Grove – DIVI landing page co-branding with Caldera

Prerequisite: Get involved in the community

At some point, you just sit down with someone and say “Hey, I need something” and then figure out what it is that you can offer them in return – how can you benefit each other?

The WordPress community is often resistant to a hard-sell, but you do at some point need to move a friendly conversation to a professional-friendly if you are interested in partnering with them – try not to be too aggressive though!

Go ahead and put your business contacts in a CRM, but make sure you keep the relationships natural – don’t always follow up on the 2nd Tuesday of the month!

One of the benefits of co-branding is you get to play off each other’s strengths

If one company does a post featuring the co-branding, it’s a good idea to do a follow-up post with your brand as well and link back

We’re ALL co-branding with WordPress – WordPress.com now allows users to install plugins and that’s a big deal for plugin authors

WordPress benefits from the volunteers that give back

Make partnerships even when you are just starting out – but start by GIVING, don’t worry so much about what you’ll get back – make yourself useful to other people, give of your time

If you know that you have a conflict with your plugin and another plugin – maybe reach out to the company on behalf of your customers instead of sending the customer to them with the problem – then you both benefit and your customers are all happier!

Great partnerships shouldn’t require a lot of effort from either side – they should be a natural give and take

Reminder – a logo is not a ‘brand’, it’s the relationships that you build with the people who use your product that makes the brand

Co-branding is to leverage the individual relationships that each brand has built with people

Whether it’s going to WordCamps, emailing, or talking on twitter, it’s all about building relationships w/ people

Brand / values matter – don’t co-brand with a company that violates your brand or what you stand for, you need to pay attention to their ‘voice’

The post WPblab EP85 – CoBranding Your WordPress Product appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined by Josh Pollock. We’ll discuss the pros and cons of co-branding your WordPress products.

Josh Pollock – Caldera Labs – Caldera Forms – Caldera

@Josh412, @calderaforms, @CalderaWP, or @CalderaLearn  #catdera

http://calderawp.com, http://calderalabs.org/, https://calderaforms.com/, & https://learn.calderalabs.org/

Co-branding is when you leverage the audience of two different brands by teaming up together to help elevate both brands or gain a new audience segment. (Like the Eddie Bauer Ford Explorer)

Caldera and Give did a co-branding with a tutorial on using Caldera Forms to submit a fundraising campaign
“Create a Peer-to-Peer Give Campaign with Caldera Forms” –  http://bit.ly/2vdvrxH

Caldera & Aspen Grove – DIVI landing page co-branding with Caldera

Prerequisite: Get involved in the community

At some point, you just sit down with someone and say “Hey, I need something” and then figure out what it is that you can offer them in return – how can you benefit each other?

The WordPress community is often resistant to a hard-sell, but you do at some point need to move a friendly conversation to a professional-friendly if you are interested in partnering with them – try not to be too aggressive though!

Go ahead and put your business contacts in a CRM, but make sure you keep the relationships natural – don’t always follow up on the 2nd Tuesday of the month!

One of the benefits of co-branding is you get to play off each other’s strengths

If one company does a post featuring the co-branding, it’s a good idea to do a follow-up post with your brand as well and link back

We’re ALL co-branding with WordPress – WordPress.com now allows users to install plugins and that’s a big deal for plugin authors

WordPress benefits from the volunteers that give back

Make partnerships even when you are just starting out – but start by GIVING, don’t worry so much about what you’ll get back – make yourself useful to other people, give of your time

If you know that you have a conflict with your plugin and another plugin – maybe reach out to the company on behalf of your customers instead of sending the customer to them with the problem – then you both benefit and your customers are all happier!

Great partnerships shouldn’t require a lot of effort from either side – they should be a natural give and take

Reminder – a logo is not a ‘brand’, it’s the relationships that you build with the people who use your product that makes the brand

Co-branding is to leverage the individual relationships that each brand has built with people

Whether it’s going to WordCamps, emailing, or talking on twitter, it’s all about building relationships w/ people

Brand / values matter – don’t co-brand with a company that violates your brand or what you stand for, you need to pay attention to their ‘voice’

The post WPblab EP85 – CoBranding Your WordPress Product appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab EP84 – Encouraging Speaking at Your Local Meetup w/ Jennifer Bourn]]> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 21:24:53 GMT 1:04:26 no

In this episode, Jennifer Bourn, lead organizer of WordCamp Sacramento (among other things), will discuss encouraging public speaking from the meetup to the camp and beyond.

The post WPblab EP84 – Encouraging Speaking at Your Local Meetup w/ Jennifer Bourn appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In this episode, Jennifer Bourn, lead organizer of WordCamp Sacramento (among other things), will discuss encouraging public speaking from the meetup to the camp and beyond.

The post WPblab EP84 – Encouraging Speaking at Your Local Meetup w/ Jennifer Bourn appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP83 – Starting an In-Person Community Online w/ Andy Lara]]> Thu, 07 Sep 2017 23:30:45 GMT 1:01:39 no

This week on WPblab we speak with Andy Lara on how he build an in-person community online for the Vox Podcast with Mike Erre

Andy Lara – Creative Director – VOX Community

Cohost of Vox Podcast – http://www.voxpodcast.com/

@andy_lara twitter

Mike wanted to create a place where he could talk about and say the kinds of things that aren’t as easy when you are bound by the rules of a church so he thought a podcast might be the way

 

Started out first online, but grew into an a community

Evangelism / Doctrine / Theology … conferences, meetups, retreats etc … there is a lot of commonality between how churches function and how the WordPress community functions

In marketing nowadays, people don’t want the hard sell – the way you evangelize a product or a community is much the same

Podcasts are one of the best things out there for transparency / reaching your customers & audience that a lot of small businesses aren’t doing. It’s a very low-budget way to create authenticity.

Mike and Andy started a podcast in Mike’s office where they were looking and talking to each other and not at the camera.  He moved away and they had to move to talking directly to the camera and it increased the audience exponentially!  People want to see faces, they want you to be talking to them!

Especially in the tech industry, a lot of people are isolated, working remotely or on their own and are missing out on the human connection which makes it even more important to reach them on a personal level

If you are just listening to a podcast and not doing something with it, you’re wasting it … you need to use the info, interact, give back

Started a church via the podcast … started with 80 church ‘planters’ and was able to launch with over 300 people because they were already engaged via the podcast. They knew the culture and the DNA before they ever showed up in person.

About 50,000 downloads per month for their podcast – people all across the nation tune in

The podcast is largely discussional, two guys hashing out the issues of the day

Their ability to sit down and do a podcast, helps them to take these big philosophical discussions and make them more accessible and conversational … it’s also a resource that they can point people to in the church

When we put our souls into our brands – that has meaning.  When we offer up who we are in our podcasts, that has meaning. It’s like when Matt Mullenweg sits down and does his talks at WCEU or WCUS. It puts a human face on what he does.

Giving integrity back to the audience – they believe their listeners are actually smart, they keep the podcast real and don’t try to hard to make it perfect and glossy

They built in a hefty feedback model where any member of the team can give feedback to Mike, even though he’s the pastor … everyone has something valuable to offer

In a community, it’s important to create a space where people can feel like they belong – you have to allow people to speak and be heard – when they feel safe and they have trust, they will speak up

Conversations and relationship are the things that transform us and make us into better and healthier people

Treat your community volunteers like real people, make them feel that their contribution is meaningful

Give your volunteers roles a real job title to make them feel important. Also limit trials to 6 months to show how people fit. Give them ownership in the process.

The post WPblab EP83 – Starting an In-Person Community Online w/ Andy Lara appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we speak with Andy Lara on how he build an in-person community online for the Vox Podcast with Mike Erre

Andy Lara – Creative Director – VOX Community

Cohost of Vox Podcast – http://www.voxpodcast.com/

@andy_lara twitter

Mike wanted to create a place where he could talk about and say the kinds of things that aren’t as easy when you are bound by the rules of a church so he thought a podcast might be the way

 

Started out first online, but grew into an a community

Evangelism / Doctrine / Theology … conferences, meetups, retreats etc … there is a lot of commonality between how churches function and how the WordPress community functions

In marketing nowadays, people don’t want the hard sell – the way you evangelize a product or a community is much the same

Podcasts are one of the best things out there for transparency / reaching your customers & audience that a lot of small businesses aren’t doing. It’s a very low-budget way to create authenticity.

Mike and Andy started a podcast in Mike’s office where they were looking and talking to each other and not at the camera.  He moved away and they had to move to talking directly to the camera and it increased the audience exponentially!  People want to see faces, they want you to be talking to them!

Especially in the tech industry, a lot of people are isolated, working remotely or on their own and are missing out on the human connection which makes it even more important to reach them on a personal level

If you are just listening to a podcast and not doing something with it, you’re wasting it … you need to use the info, interact, give back

Started a church via the podcast … started with 80 church ‘planters’ and was able to launch with over 300 people because they were already engaged via the podcast. They knew the culture and the DNA before they ever showed up in person.

About 50,000 downloads per month for their podcast – people all across the nation tune in

The podcast is largely discussional, two guys hashing out the issues of the day

Their ability to sit down and do a podcast, helps them to take these big philosophical discussions and make them more accessible and conversational … it’s also a resource that they can point people to in the church

When we put our souls into our brands – that has meaning.  When we offer up who we are in our podcasts, that has meaning. It’s like when Matt Mullenweg sits down and does his talks at WCEU or WCUS. It puts a human face on what he does.

Giving integrity back to the audience – they believe their listeners are actually smart, they keep the podcast real and don’t try to hard to make it perfect and glossy

They built in a hefty feedback model where any member of the team can give feedback to Mike, even though he’s the pastor … everyone has something valuable to offer

In a community, it’s important to create a space where people can feel like they belong – you have to allow people to speak and be heard – when they feel safe and they have trust, they will speak up

Conversations and relationship are the things that transform us and make us into better and healthier people

Treat your community volunteers like real people, make them feel that their contribution is meaningful

Give your volunteers roles a real job title to make them feel important. Also limit trials to 6 months to show how people fit. Give them ownership in the process.

The post WPblab EP83 – Starting an In-Person Community Online w/ Andy Lara appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP82 – Digging into Twitter Demographics for your WordPress Business]]> Thu, 24 Aug 2017 18:34:27 GMT 57:01 no

This week on WPblab Bridget and Jason explore Twitter demographics and how you can use them for your WordPress business.

Bridget got a new microphone 🙂 – YAY!

Twitter > Analytics (available via desktop twitter site)

Analytics.twitter.com

Audience – discover user interests and general statistics, such as marital status and education.  If you were a dating site, you would want most of your audience to show as “single”. If they were mostly married, you might reaching out to the wrong audience (or offering the wrong service!)

How long should your content be? What grade level is your writing aimed at?  Check your analytics and see what kind of education your followers have – what would be best for them?

Newspapers generally aim at a fifth grade reading level (WSJ – ninth grade). Most people, don’t read – they scan. You don’t want to make people feel stupid by speaking at a level beyond their reading/vocabulary skills.

Analytics shows stats on Audience, Demographics, Lifestyle, etc.

Go to Analytics > Tweets and choose to view “Top Tweets” – it will show you your top-performing tweets from the last 28 days — as long as the content is evergreen, you can recycle it and retweet it back out to your followers

Try viewing your Google Analytics and comparing to your Twitter Analytics – do the demographics align or not, and if not, why don’t they match?

There is a whole culture in your industry – find out what they say and how they say it – speak to them the way that they speak if you want to reach them. Social media marketing is like being a sociologist, you have to study the culture. Tweak your writing to reach them.

You can also use your demographics to determine how much to charge for your work and if/when you should raise your prices.

Ben Collins – http://www.benlcollins.com/spreadsheets/import-social-media-statistics

Why care about twitter?  Regardless of how you felt about the election, tweets and people reading them had an incredible impact on the election. Celebrities and thought leaders, writers, artists, musicians, all use twitter to reach their audience.

If you are looking to cross-promote a work-from-home writer job, you are going to want to look for people and accounts that have a larger number of homemakers as their audience

The post WPblab EP82 – Digging into Twitter Demographics for your WordPress Business appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Bridget and Jason explore Twitter demographics and how you can use them for your WordPress business.

Bridget got a new microphone 🙂 – YAY!

Twitter > Analytics (available via desktop twitter site)

Analytics.twitter.com

Audience – discover user interests and general statistics, such as marital status and education.  If you were a dating site, you would want most of your audience to show as “single”. If they were mostly married, you might reaching out to the wrong audience (or offering the wrong service!)

How long should your content be? What grade level is your writing aimed at?  Check your analytics and see what kind of education your followers have – what would be best for them?

Newspapers generally aim at a fifth grade reading level (WSJ – ninth grade). Most people, don’t read – they scan. You don’t want to make people feel stupid by speaking at a level beyond their reading/vocabulary skills.

Analytics shows stats on Audience, Demographics, Lifestyle, etc.

Go to Analytics > Tweets and choose to view “Top Tweets” – it will show you your top-performing tweets from the last 28 days — as long as the content is evergreen, you can recycle it and retweet it back out to your followers

Try viewing your Google Analytics and comparing to your Twitter Analytics – do the demographics align or not, and if not, why don’t they match?

There is a whole culture in your industry – find out what they say and how they say it – speak to them the way that they speak if you want to reach them. Social media marketing is like being a sociologist, you have to study the culture. Tweak your writing to reach them.

You can also use your demographics to determine how much to charge for your work and if/when you should raise your prices.

Ben Collins – http://www.benlcollins.com/spreadsheets/import-social-media-statistics

Why care about twitter?  Regardless of how you felt about the election, tweets and people reading them had an incredible impact on the election. Celebrities and thought leaders, writers, artists, musicians, all use twitter to reach their audience.

If you are looking to cross-promote a work-from-home writer job, you are going to want to look for people and accounts that have a larger number of homemakers as their audience

The post WPblab EP82 – Digging into Twitter Demographics for your WordPress Business appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP81 – Data-Centric Email Marketing for WordPress Businesses with Christie Chirinos]]> Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:24 GMT 59:10 no

Segmentation FTW.

Christie Chirinos email marketing as an intelligent combination of transactional emails & direct emails in part with a multi channel promotion strategy that exists as a part of a larger marketing strategy that also takes the other 3 P's into account… also FTW

Personal twitter – https://twitter.com/cicichirinos
Partner of Caldera Labs https://calderaforms.com/
https://twitter.com/CalderaWP

She started in the nonprofit sector learning by doing.

https://mailchimp.com/ (should tag with affiliate link)

They use convertkit on CalderaForms now. https://convertkit.com/

ConvertKit is a great tool from segments but not user friendly

ConvertKit = Photoshop

MailChimp = Canva

 

Segmented lists

Many lists can create problems with subscriptions. Consider consolidating your lists and segmenting them out.

 

Example of a segmented

Is this for you or your clients on checkout

 

Focus your copy

“Or this” or “if that” = Segment

 

Bridget loves old navy

Use case

Goals for creating one and done leads

1st a month

1 segments

 

Questions

  • Who is clicking
  • What are they clicking
  • What time of day are they opening the emails

Try for 3 months, Look what happened and change things after that

Don’t talk at people when writing content

Freelancer personal

  • Collect emails, Build your list

How to segment your list?

  • You can just ask in your next newsletter

I think bridget said a couple weeks ago to think about when you are sending out newsletters. In the morning things get purged. IF you send it later in the day, someone might spend the time to read it b/c no one wants to work after lunch.

The post WPblab EP81 – Data-Centric Email Marketing for WordPress Businesses with Christie Chirinos appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Segmentation FTW.

Christie Chirinos email marketing as an intelligent combination of transactional emails & direct emails in part with a multi channel promotion strategy that exists as a part of a larger marketing strategy that also takes the other 3 P's into account… also FTW

Personal twitter – https://twitter.com/cicichirinos
Partner of Caldera Labs https://calderaforms.com/
https://twitter.com/CalderaWP

She started in the nonprofit sector learning by doing.

https://mailchimp.com/ (should tag with affiliate link)

They use convertkit on CalderaForms now. https://convertkit.com/

ConvertKit is a great tool from segments but not user friendly

ConvertKit = Photoshop

MailChimp = Canva

 

Segmented lists

Many lists can create problems with subscriptions. Consider consolidating your lists and segmenting them out.

 

Example of a segmented

Is this for you or your clients on checkout

 

Focus your copy

“Or this” or “if that” = Segment

 

Bridget loves old navy

Use case

Goals for creating one and done leads

1st a month

1 segments

 

Questions

  • Who is clicking
  • What are they clicking
  • What time of day are they opening the emails

Try for 3 months, Look what happened and change things after that

Don’t talk at people when writing content

Freelancer personal

  • Collect emails, Build your list

How to segment your list?

  • You can just ask in your next newsletter

I think bridget said a couple weeks ago to think about when you are sending out newsletters. In the morning things get purged. IF you send it later in the day, someone might spend the time to read it b/c no one wants to work after lunch.

The post WPblab EP81 – Data-Centric Email Marketing for WordPress Businesses with Christie Chirinos appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP80 – Boosting eCommerce with Opt-Ins with Scott Bolinger]]> Thu, 03 Aug 2017 16:48:35 GMT 1:00:35 no

This week on WPwatercooler we'll be discussing what to look for in a good WordPress theme.

https://apppresser.com/ & Holler Box https://hollerwp.com/

Challenges of collecting email addresses

It’s much easier to get someones email when you already have a blog and can get them to provide emails to get updates and downloads/goodies, etc.

Generating great content is super important for any site, but even more so for an e-commerce site, makes it easier to get people to opt-in if you have content they need/want

Oh average, It takes 7-10 interactions before you win a customer.

If you have a small audience and low traffic to your site, getting people there and generating sales can be really difficult.  Doing content halfway won’t get you there.

Have a plan before you write your post – need a strategy about what you’re going to write and who you’re aiming to reach

  1. Writing for people that will share it(influencers)
  2. Thinking of them by name

Being intentional about what you write and who you write it for makes a huge difference

Holler box
https://wordpress.org/plugins/holler-box/

1 article – 10-20 hours writing per post(with research and planning)

Spending time up front will pay you back in spades!

Content is long-term and the internet lasts forever – it doesn’t matter so much if it takes a while to gain traction, it’s still going to be there

Include people in your posts by linking to them or mentioning them by name – they’re much more likely to share and interact with the post than your average reader

Be around and be active – people will notice and reach out to you

Write/share (videos too) with authenticity about your brand and who you are.

Create content that is not only good but is also based on your personal experience – it shows authenticity and builds trust between you and your audience / customer.

Live chat can cause your customers to become lazy.  If you take it away, they will spend a little more time looking around your site for the answers to their questions.

Great idea to include a feature on your site that let’s people know what others are buying – leads to a feeling of FOMO (fear of missing out) and encourages people to purchase  **feature of Holler Box

Bridget: “When customers talk to you, it’s good to get the insight.” You know where everything is on your site, but your customers don’t often know how to find it.

Write content about your core competencies and it will help you to attract the right kind of customer

If you want more shares and more traffic , don’t think as much about writing or creating content for your ideal customer – write content aimed at the people who you know will share it and who are influencers in your area. A lot of times the customer will consume what you sell but may not share it.

Don’t look for the biggest people but instead for the consistent users who post often and engage with their audience. Build on the relationships you already have.

 

Brian Dean backlinko
http://backlinko.com/blog

You can write a fantastic post that you’re really interested in, but that doesn’t mean anyone else will be. You need to be a resource to your audience and offer what they’re looking for.

7 Ways to Use Discounts Without Hurting Your Brand

https://hollerwp.com/discount-without-hurting-your-brand/

If you use discounts the wrong way, it’s bad for you and it’s bad for your business.  If you offer them to often, they will just wait for the next discount.   You need to space them out and make exclusive discounts available only to people who sign up for certain packages.

Don’t offer discounts to get people on your email list.  You are basically being Walmart.  You’re the low-price discount guy after that.   Or you can be more strategic. (and you should be)

What are you offering people with your opt-in? It needs to be something of value to your customers/visitors, or the message won't’ matter.

Evenings are often a good time to send emails because inboxes are not as full.

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂

James Tryon @jamestryon ;c )

The post WPblab EP80 – Boosting eCommerce with Opt-Ins with Scott Bolinger appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPwatercooler we'll be discussing what to look for in a good WordPress theme.

https://apppresser.com/ & Holler Box https://hollerwp.com/

Challenges of collecting email addresses

It’s much easier to get someones email when you already have a blog and can get them to provide emails to get updates and downloads/goodies, etc.

Generating great content is super important for any site, but even more so for an e-commerce site, makes it easier to get people to opt-in if you have content they need/want

Oh average, It takes 7-10 interactions before you win a customer.

If you have a small audience and low traffic to your site, getting people there and generating sales can be really difficult.  Doing content halfway won’t get you there.

Have a plan before you write your post – need a strategy about what you’re going to write and who you’re aiming to reach

  1. Writing for people that will share it(influencers)
  2. Thinking of them by name

Being intentional about what you write and who you write it for makes a huge difference

Holler box
https://wordpress.org/plugins/holler-box/

1 article – 10-20 hours writing per post(with research and planning)

Spending time up front will pay you back in spades!

Content is long-term and the internet lasts forever – it doesn’t matter so much if it takes a while to gain traction, it’s still going to be there

Include people in your posts by linking to them or mentioning them by name – they’re much more likely to share and interact with the post than your average reader

Be around and be active – people will notice and reach out to you

Write/share (videos too) with authenticity about your brand and who you are.

Create content that is not only good but is also based on your personal experience – it shows authenticity and builds trust between you and your audience / customer.

Live chat can cause your customers to become lazy.  If you take it away, they will spend a little more time looking around your site for the answers to their questions.

Great idea to include a feature on your site that let’s people know what others are buying – leads to a feeling of FOMO (fear of missing out) and encourages people to purchase  **feature of Holler Box

Bridget: “When customers talk to you, it’s good to get the insight.” You know where everything is on your site, but your customers don’t often know how to find it.

Write content about your core competencies and it will help you to attract the right kind of customer

If you want more shares and more traffic , don’t think as much about writing or creating content for your ideal customer – write content aimed at the people who you know will share it and who are influencers in your area. A lot of times the customer will consume what you sell but may not share it.

Don’t look for the biggest people but instead for the consistent users who post often and engage with their audience. Build on the relationships you already have.

 

Brian Dean backlinko
http://backlinko.com/blog

You can write a fantastic post that you’re really interested in, but that doesn’t mean anyone else will be. You need to be a resource to your audience and offer what they’re looking for.

7 Ways to Use Discounts Without Hurting Your Brand

https://hollerwp.com/discount-without-hurting-your-brand/

If you use discounts the wrong way, it’s bad for you and it’s bad for your business.  If you offer them to often, they will just wait for the next discount.   You need to space them out and make exclusive discounts available only to people who sign up for certain packages.

Don’t offer discounts to get people on your email list.  You are basically being Walmart.  You’re the low-price discount guy after that.   Or you can be more strategic. (and you should be)

What are you offering people with your opt-in? It needs to be something of value to your customers/visitors, or the message won't’ matter.

Evenings are often a good time to send emails because inboxes are not as full.

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl 🙂

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie  🙂

James Tryon @jamestryon ;c )

The post WPblab EP80 – Boosting eCommerce with Opt-Ins with Scott Bolinger appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP79 – The Psychology of Color in Design w/ Meagan Hanes]]> Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:21:21 GMT 59:41 no

In web design, brand creation, and even creative, the psychology of color matters. In this episode of WPblab, Designer and Developer Meagan Hanes will talk us through some of the considerations on how color affects us — as consumers.

Meagan Hanes

Designer/Developer since the 2000’s

Developers often struggle with design – color can be one of the most challenging aspects

Take a design magazine, rip it up and start making a pinboard in real life – it’s a great way to start training your eye

http://colourlovers.com

Communicating meaning in your brand’s colors

  • There is a lot of symbolism in color choices
  • Generally speaking, reds are passionate, greens and blues are soothing, nature colors
  • Happy and generous can be shown with warm yellow colors

McDonald’s chose red and yellow because they make you hungry but they are also bold, agitating colors that cause customers to leave quicker, which is desirable in fast food!

When communicating your branding, the colors you pick can make or break your message.  Best to pick a color or two and stick with them! Keep it simple!

Orange and Green have the highest click-thru rates

Contrasting color is important – you can get color fatigue when faced with a page or design that is based all on one color.  Your users may not notice a button if it’s in the same color as everything else on your page.

I use this a lot http://paletton.com/
WCAG is important too – Making sure there is enough contrast for visually impaired people can see it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Content_Accessibility_Guidelines

If you removed the color from your design, it should still work and communicate clearly in black and white

There are sites where you can test colors for accessibility to make sure people with different color blindness challenges can see it as intended

If you take off your glasses or squint at your page and can’t see what the page is doing because of color distraction, etc. you need to rethink your design

Everyone’s perception of color is ultimately different.

People are starting to understand warm and cool light and what that means.

Pinterest is a great tool for exploring branding and colors, use it for yourself and your clients

You can choose green for your eco-friendly company, but if you don’t back up your marketing with action, no one will believe you

Pick a main color and then maybe a secondary or tertiary color and stick to those – it gets especially hard to change colors as a company gets bigger

Supreme Red
http://www.colourlovers.com/color/D02120/Supreme_Red

Heineken Green
http://www.colourlovers.com/color/0A7A06/Heineken_Green

 

Brand Guidelines

“Like a reference guide to your company’s soul”

  • Standardized color definitions
  • Layout, sizing, fonts, etc.

Maybe go to art shows and listen to how people react to get a better idea of how people respond to art and color

Design should be somewhat rigid (color) but it should also be iterative – with feedback/time, sometimes your ideas/direction will change

Tiffany Blue
https://www.pantone.com/crazy-about-tiffanys-the-story-behind-an-iconic-brand-color

Colors also convey feeling and emotion – beachy colors can bring to mind memories of the smell of salty air or the feeling of sand between your toes and the sound of waves

 

Pinkest Pink
https://culturehustle.com/products/pink-50g-powdered-paint-by-stuart-semple

http://stuartsemple.com/

 

The Blackest Black Exclusive Rights
https://news.artnet.com/art-world/anish-kapoor-vantablack-exclusive-rights-436610

http://www.colourlovers.com/palette/2390263/WordPress_Rocks

 

https://wordpress.org/about/logos/

Orange

Pantone 1665

CMYK 6, 86, 100, 1

Hex #d54e21

RGB 213, 78, 33

Official Logos and Typeface

 

Your color palette on your website should follow what you’ve established in your brand guidelines. If you don’t have one yet, you need to develop one or get help creating it!  Fonts, logo usage, size, proportions, colors, accepted uses, etc.  Even if you don’t have the money to hire someone to create it, you could even just start a google doc and start documenting the colors, fonts, etc that you decide to use.

 

Document what you use and save a record of what you do for your clients.  If they come back for repeat business (which they should!), it will save you a lot of time!

The post WPblab EP79 – The Psychology of Color in Design w/ Meagan Hanes appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

In web design, brand creation, and even creative, the psychology of color matters. In this episode of WPblab, Designer and Developer Meagan Hanes will talk us through some of the considerations on how color affects us — as consumers.

Meagan Hanes

Designer/Developer since the 2000’s

Developers often struggle with design – color can be one of the most challenging aspects

Take a design magazine, rip it up and start making a pinboard in real life – it’s a great way to start training your eye

http://colourlovers.com

Communicating meaning in your brand’s colors

  • There is a lot of symbolism in color choices
  • Generally speaking, reds are passionate, greens and blues are soothing, nature colors
  • Happy and generous can be shown with warm yellow colors

McDonald’s chose red and yellow because they make you hungry but they are also bold, agitating colors that cause customers to leave quicker, which is desirable in fast food!

When communicating your branding, the colors you pick can make or break your message.  Best to pick a color or two and stick with them! Keep it simple!

Orange and Green have the highest click-thru rates

Contrasting color is important – you can get color fatigue when faced with a page or design that is based all on one color.  Your users may not notice a button if it’s in the same color as everything else on your page.

I use this a lot http://paletton.com/
WCAG is important too – Making sure there is enough contrast for visually impaired people can see it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Content_Accessibility_Guidelines

If you removed the color from your design, it should still work and communicate clearly in black and white

There are sites where you can test colors for accessibility to make sure people with different color blindness challenges can see it as intended

If you take off your glasses or squint at your page and can’t see what the page is doing because of color distraction, etc. you need to rethink your design

Everyone’s perception of color is ultimately different.

People are starting to understand warm and cool light and what that means.

Pinterest is a great tool for exploring branding and colors, use it for yourself and your clients

You can choose green for your eco-friendly company, but if you don’t back up your marketing with action, no one will believe you

Pick a main color and then maybe a secondary or tertiary color and stick to those – it gets especially hard to change colors as a company gets bigger

Supreme Red
http://www.colourlovers.com/color/D02120/Supreme_Red

Heineken Green
http://www.colourlovers.com/color/0A7A06/Heineken_Green

 

Brand Guidelines

“Like a reference guide to your company’s soul”

  • Standardized color definitions
  • Layout, sizing, fonts, etc.

Maybe go to art shows and listen to how people react to get a better idea of how people respond to art and color

Design should be somewhat rigid (color) but it should also be iterative – with feedback/time, sometimes your ideas/direction will change

Tiffany Blue
https://www.pantone.com/crazy-about-tiffanys-the-story-behind-an-iconic-brand-color

Colors also convey feeling and emotion – beachy colors can bring to mind memories of the smell of salty air or the feeling of sand between your toes and the sound of waves

 

Pinkest Pink
https://culturehustle.com/products/pink-50g-powdered-paint-by-stuart-semple

http://stuartsemple.com/

 

The Blackest Black Exclusive Rights
https://news.artnet.com/art-world/anish-kapoor-vantablack-exclusive-rights-436610

http://www.colourlovers.com/palette/2390263/WordPress_Rocks

 

https://wordpress.org/about/logos/

Orange

Pantone 1665

CMYK 6, 86, 100, 1

Hex #d54e21

RGB 213, 78, 33

Official Logos and Typeface

 

Your color palette on your website should follow what you’ve established in your brand guidelines. If you don’t have one yet, you need to develop one or get help creating it!  Fonts, logo usage, size, proportions, colors, accepted uses, etc.  Even if you don’t have the money to hire someone to create it, you could even just start a google doc and start documenting the colors, fonts, etc that you decide to use.

 

Document what you use and save a record of what you do for your clients.  If they come back for repeat business (which they should!), it will save you a lot of time!

The post WPblab EP79 – The Psychology of Color in Design w/ Meagan Hanes appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP78 – Marketing your Meetup using WordPress]]> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 21:38:05 GMT 1:00:16 no

This week Jason Tucker is joined by Verious Smith to discuss how you can market your Meetup.com group using WordPress.

Both Verious and Jason run WordPress meetups

Decided to try a Google Hangout and see who would show up – met Jason, Russell Aaron was there too (met Russell in Vegas before moving to California)

Meetups are how you build community – finding people who share a common interest. If you want to do something cool and need someone to do it with, check out Meetup!

Meetup is great, but communities aren’t built instantly. Make sure you have a website for your meetup!! There is only so much that you can include on meetup – a website gives you more control over the content you can share with your members and the appearance.

People that you meet and interact with each month in your meetup can quickly become your friends, coworkers, etc… great for if you are new to town!

You can offer learning/training resources on your WordPress site for your meetup members.

Example from Verious: https://philoveracity.com/wp-theme-setup-guide/

https://inlandempirewp.com/

https://wpnyc.org/

Organizing/running special events is a great way to market your meetup to the community – i.e: hackathons, do_action events, ‘Website Weekend’, etc.

https://doaction.org/about/

http://websiteweekend.la/

Verious will be promoting WordPress and his local community at “Startup Week”. It’s a good option if you want to promote your meetup to a wider, non-WordPress community

https://riverside.startupweek.co/

 

Plugins

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie

The post WPblab EP78 – Marketing your Meetup using WordPress appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week Jason Tucker is joined by Verious Smith to discuss how you can market your Meetup.com group using WordPress.

Both Verious and Jason run WordPress meetups

Decided to try a Google Hangout and see who would show up – met Jason, Russell Aaron was there too (met Russell in Vegas before moving to California)

Meetups are how you build community – finding people who share a common interest. If you want to do something cool and need someone to do it with, check out Meetup!

Meetup is great, but communities aren’t built instantly. Make sure you have a website for your meetup!! There is only so much that you can include on meetup – a website gives you more control over the content you can share with your members and the appearance.

People that you meet and interact with each month in your meetup can quickly become your friends, coworkers, etc… great for if you are new to town!

You can offer learning/training resources on your WordPress site for your meetup members.

Example from Verious: https://philoveracity.com/wp-theme-setup-guide/

https://inlandempirewp.com/

https://wpnyc.org/

Organizing/running special events is a great way to market your meetup to the community – i.e: hackathons, do_action events, ‘Website Weekend’, etc.

https://doaction.org/about/

http://websiteweekend.la/

Verious will be promoting WordPress and his local community at “Startup Week”. It’s a good option if you want to promote your meetup to a wider, non-WordPress community

https://riverside.startupweek.co/

 

Plugins

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl

Sherie LaPrade @heysherie

The post WPblab EP78 – Marketing your Meetup using WordPress appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPBlab EP77 – Building a Social Network on Your Existing WordPress Site]]> Wed, 05 Jul 2017 19:04:49 GMT 1:00:51 no

This week on WPblab we talk with Eric Tracz & Brad Bihun of PeepSo about how you can build a social network on your existing WordPress website.

Why do we need a social network on WordPress?

We all live in our own little niche communities – we can translate that into online communities – with very detailed content that is relative to a very specific group / niche

Facebook groups are great, but you don’t get the feeling of a small close-knit community that you would from a social network built on a niche site

There are a lot of people that prefer not to post/share on Facebook due to privacy

When you create your own community, you have more control and you can empower your users – they can help each other and answer questions or give advice to fellow community members

Private social communities can be especially useful for people who want to share sensitive and private information (such as communities built around a support group)

Building community takes time and effort regardless of the method you choose. No matter where you build community, you have to be welcoming.  You need to greet people; you need to genuinely care. People can tell if you aren’t authentic.

It’s important to keep in mind having proper security on your website if you’re going to implement a social network/community – https is a necessity

If you need to really lock things down and keep them private, you could take the approach where only members can invite new people to join, that way they are already known and they can vouch for them. You could also charge a nominal fee for membership to keep things more exclusive.

PeepSo Whitepaper free download “The Secrets of Successful Online Communities

When building a community, try to think ahead about what you will need and the next evolution of your site.  Will you need forums, will you need chat?  Try to think of the future and not just what you need right now.

You have a choice as the website owner whether or not you want to build a community around transparency with users sharing their real names or anonymity with users relying on screen names

For examples, check out the PeepSo website, which uses the technology – they will also be creating a Community Showcase in the next couple of weeks.  There are also demos available on the site.

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

The post WPBlab EP77 – Building a Social Network on Your Existing WordPress Site appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we talk with Eric Tracz & Brad Bihun of PeepSo about how you can build a social network on your existing WordPress website.

Why do we need a social network on WordPress?

We all live in our own little niche communities – we can translate that into online communities – with very detailed content that is relative to a very specific group / niche

Facebook groups are great, but you don’t get the feeling of a small close-knit community that you would from a social network built on a niche site

There are a lot of people that prefer not to post/share on Facebook due to privacy

When you create your own community, you have more control and you can empower your users – they can help each other and answer questions or give advice to fellow community members

Private social communities can be especially useful for people who want to share sensitive and private information (such as communities built around a support group)

Building community takes time and effort regardless of the method you choose. No matter where you build community, you have to be welcoming.  You need to greet people; you need to genuinely care. People can tell if you aren’t authentic.

It’s important to keep in mind having proper security on your website if you’re going to implement a social network/community – https is a necessity

If you need to really lock things down and keep them private, you could take the approach where only members can invite new people to join, that way they are already known and they can vouch for them. You could also charge a nominal fee for membership to keep things more exclusive.

PeepSo Whitepaper free download “The Secrets of Successful Online Communities

When building a community, try to think ahead about what you will need and the next evolution of your site.  Will you need forums, will you need chat?  Try to think of the future and not just what you need right now.

You have a choice as the website owner whether or not you want to build a community around transparency with users sharing their real names or anonymity with users relying on screen names

For examples, check out the PeepSo website, which uses the technology – they will also be creating a Community Showcase in the next couple of weeks.  There are also demos available on the site.

_________________________________________

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

The post WPBlab EP77 – Building a Social Network on Your Existing WordPress Site appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPBlab EP76 – WordPress & Nonprofits- Tips on Keeping Your Volunteer Webmaster]]> Thu, 29 Jun 2017 23:03:27 GMT 58:01 no

This week on WPblab Bridget and Jason discuss taking on volunteers for a nonprofit and how to keep them interested in working as a volunteer webmaster for your WordPress website.

Inspired by Should You Work with a Volunteer?

Jason works for a nonprofit and Bridget works with nonprofit businesses

With volunteers, you need to give them encouragement (“Yes, you can do this!”), but there are limitations

  • They need to know the software (WordPress)

Communication is important, even if you enable your volunteers, you need to communicate with other departments, employees, etc. that the volunteer has the authority and ability to get/share information

Volunteers should be empowered & equipped – make sure they have the right access to everything they need and the right tools to get the job done. (ie. don’t have a Hackathon without making sure your participants have laptops!)

Don’t require all of your volunteers to be in the office when they volunteer – they may be stay-at-home moms/dads or have other work-related obligations and their availability and schedule will vary

If you can trust a volunteer with your website, you should be able to trust them with borrowing a $200 chromebook!

If you aren’t sure if they can be trusted yet, WordPress is great in that you can control their level of access and perhaps only allow them to draft posts or pages but require approval before they are posted.

Editorial Calendar

In the WordPress project, everyone involved from WordCamp organizers, to Meetup organizers, to contributors to different teams … is a volunteer! We need to remember that volunteers are giving of their time because it’s a cause that is important to them and that their time is worth something.

Maybe someone who wants to volunteer doesn’t have all the skills – try pairing them up with people who can fill in the gaps and encourage them to do what they are able to do, rather than discourage them

Add or delete users from your Campaigns organization

Give them a “sandbox”  that they can just ‘play’ with and learn how things work and make mistakes, then give them enough access to be able to do what they need to do, but not so much that they can do damage

  • Be very careful with young interns to instruct on ‘behavior’ and ‘voice’ for social media

Social media is typically the primary way people will use to get in touch with you and your organization

  • Try not to answer/fix everything publicly, use DM and email as well, redirect to proper channels

Part of equipping people is giving them the information they need to know how to answer questions or who to contact to get them answered properly

The worst thing you can do on social media is ‘never respond’ to someone trying to contact your organization

Have a plan in place for after your “summer interns/volunteers” leave to go back to school. Don’t let those social accounts die.

If you’re relying on automated tech, make sure it’s working, especially if you’re using it during a crucial campaign – make sure that replies are getting to your audience

WordCamp Atlanta – WordPress TV – Mallie Hart – Automation vs. Scheduling – be intentional even with your automation, and be sure to respond to questions

If you need to, divide and conquer – set up a team where someone handles facebook, someone else takes care of instagram, etc.

Have volunteer work-days – gives you a chance to get them all together and observe how they work and what their unique skills are – they may think they fit in one area, but you might find they are really skilled in another area that you weren’t aware of

Don’t put your volunteers in a “silo” – make sure they are communicating – maybe once a month have a meetup or a hangout with coffee/snacks – they will feel more connected and more valued & excited to keep contributing

Referring and bringing your friends is a great way to grow the volunteer base


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

The post WPBlab EP76 – WordPress & Nonprofits- Tips on Keeping Your Volunteer Webmaster appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Bridget and Jason discuss taking on volunteers for a nonprofit and how to keep them interested in working as a volunteer webmaster for your WordPress website.

Inspired by Should You Work with a Volunteer?

Jason works for a nonprofit and Bridget works with nonprofit businesses

With volunteers, you need to give them encouragement (“Yes, you can do this!”), but there are limitations

  • They need to know the software (WordPress)

Communication is important, even if you enable your volunteers, you need to communicate with other departments, employees, etc. that the volunteer has the authority and ability to get/share information

Volunteers should be empowered & equipped – make sure they have the right access to everything they need and the right tools to get the job done. (ie. don’t have a Hackathon without making sure your participants have laptops!)

Don’t require all of your volunteers to be in the office when they volunteer – they may be stay-at-home moms/dads or have other work-related obligations and their availability and schedule will vary

If you can trust a volunteer with your website, you should be able to trust them with borrowing a $200 chromebook!

If you aren’t sure if they can be trusted yet, WordPress is great in that you can control their level of access and perhaps only allow them to draft posts or pages but require approval before they are posted.

Editorial Calendar

In the WordPress project, everyone involved from WordCamp organizers, to Meetup organizers, to contributors to different teams … is a volunteer! We need to remember that volunteers are giving of their time because it’s a cause that is important to them and that their time is worth something.

Maybe someone who wants to volunteer doesn’t have all the skills – try pairing them up with people who can fill in the gaps and encourage them to do what they are able to do, rather than discourage them

Add or delete users from your Campaigns organization

Give them a “sandbox”  that they can just ‘play’ with and learn how things work and make mistakes, then give them enough access to be able to do what they need to do, but not so much that they can do damage

  • Be very careful with young interns to instruct on ‘behavior’ and ‘voice’ for social media

Social media is typically the primary way people will use to get in touch with you and your organization

  • Try not to answer/fix everything publicly, use DM and email as well, redirect to proper channels

Part of equipping people is giving them the information they need to know how to answer questions or who to contact to get them answered properly

The worst thing you can do on social media is ‘never respond’ to someone trying to contact your organization

Have a plan in place for after your “summer interns/volunteers” leave to go back to school. Don’t let those social accounts die.

If you’re relying on automated tech, make sure it’s working, especially if you’re using it during a crucial campaign – make sure that replies are getting to your audience

WordCamp Atlanta – WordPress TV – Mallie Hart – Automation vs. Scheduling – be intentional even with your automation, and be sure to respond to questions

If you need to, divide and conquer – set up a team where someone handles facebook, someone else takes care of instagram, etc.

Have volunteer work-days – gives you a chance to get them all together and observe how they work and what their unique skills are – they may think they fit in one area, but you might find they are really skilled in another area that you weren’t aware of

Don’t put your volunteers in a “silo” – make sure they are communicating – maybe once a month have a meetup or a hangout with coffee/snacks – they will feel more connected and more valued & excited to keep contributing

Referring and bringing your friends is a great way to grow the volunteer base


Thanks for helping with our show notes!

The post WPBlab EP76 – WordPress & Nonprofits- Tips on Keeping Your Volunteer Webmaster appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPBlab EP75 – Marketing Your WordPress Niche with Twitter Chats]]> Fri, 02 Jun 2017 00:41:52 GMT 1:00:26 no

This week on WPblab we'll be discussing how to market your WordPress niche with Twitter Chats. It should be a fun episode learning how to interact with a twitter chat and how to run one yourself using your own hashtag.

Twitter Chats – using hashtags: (#) + ‘keyword’ to filter/track related posts on a specific topic

Back in the 90’s AOL had chatrooms with names where you could talk to people about a common topic. Anyone was welcome and it was public. Twitter chats are the modern day version of that.

Hashtags help you to filter and search twitter – Twitter chats are “LIVE” versions of that search where people are commenting and participating in real-time

You can register your chat on twubs.com but NO ONE can own a hashtag (since anyone can type and use them). It’s important for your hashtag to be unique. If you see a hashtag that was once used but is no longer, you can always ask the original parties who used it if it’s available, but better to select something no one is already using.

Twitter chats can take 3-4 hours a week to manage.
If you are starting one from scratch, ask some friends to join you when you launch!
You’ll need 6-10 questions – extra brownie points if you post them in advance to blog/social media for people to see and plan ahead!
Try to set a specific time for your chat every week & hold them regularly so people always know when to tune in – don’t forget that people need to be reminded, too
Also, do a recap / summary post after the chat for people who missed out.
You want to pick good questions that will produce good answers to help further the conversation! It’s like reverse engineering a blog post. Know what answers/discussions you are looking to have and work backwards to develop the questions that will get you there.
Consider adding a category to your blog for the twitter chats to keep an archive of the recaps
If you get stuck looking for a topic, ask your audience and give them credit for the idea
Be committed – it can take up to a year to develop a solid chat

A twitter chat is a lot like a talk show except everyone gets to answer at the same time – you need to keep things organized or a busy chat can easily get out of control. Use a format like Q1) … Q2)… and encourage your participants to use A1)…. A2) for their answers. Try to discourage hitting ‘reply’.

Twitter Chat tools
==================
Twubs.com
example: http://twubs.com/NPChat
Tweetchat.com
example: http://tweetchat.com/room/npchat
Tchat.io
example: http://www.tchat.io/rooms/npchat

TweetReach.com – get stats on last 100 tweets

When you attend a twitter chat and interact, you know you’re chatting with real people, not bots – you will usually pick up followers and not just random followers, but quality ones

Make a Twitter List based on your chats to help track people who are participating. Then you can engage with them during the week when the chat is not happening.

The main purpose (from a strategic viewpoint) of attending or running a twitter chat is to establish yourself as a leader or expert in that niche

Don’t be afraid to ask higher profile twitter users or users with a lot of influence who are related to your topic to join you in hosting one of your chats!

Oembed -allows you to embed tweets on your blog and/or website

Favorite your own tweets – it’s “bookmarking”! Then when people answer your questions, heart all of them. As soon as chat ends, take another 30-60 mins to go back to your profile “likes” and work backwards to find the answers to the questions. Right-click and select “copy link” and then unfavorite and then go to the next. Pick the 3-5 best answers!

Project on GitHub called ‘T’ sferik – twitter client for terminal: https://github.com/sferik/t

If you do host a chat, it’s highly recommended to add that information to your Twitter bio – when people click the hashtag, it will suggest people for them to follow

Promoting:
use the right social network to promote – think of your audience.
Best promotion is blog post. In your blog, try to include a feature/plugin that allows them to add the chat to their calendar.
Post about it in relevant groups, but ONLY if you are a giver / active participant. A little bit of generosity goes a long way.

Find out what your ‘niche’ is – what is that you do that makes you special! What is that you love, what kind of clients do you take on the most? Is there a theme or a pattern to how you spend your time or who you work with? Are there things that you are really good at?

Look at your twitter analytics – what do your followers / friends have in common? Is your account the right account to run this specific chat on? Make sure if you are going to run a chat – make sure it’s line with you, your areas of expertise, and your audience.

Repurpose content – look back at your old blog posts

_________________________________________
Thanks for helping with our show notes!
Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPBlab EP75 – Marketing Your WordPress Niche with Twitter Chats appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be discussing how to market your WordPress niche with Twitter Chats. It should be a fun episode learning how to interact with a twitter chat and how to run one yourself using your own hashtag.

Twitter Chats – using hashtags: (#) + ‘keyword’ to filter/track related posts on a specific topic

Back in the 90’s AOL had chatrooms with names where you could talk to people about a common topic. Anyone was welcome and it was public. Twitter chats are the modern day version of that.

Hashtags help you to filter and search twitter – Twitter chats are “LIVE” versions of that search where people are commenting and participating in real-time

You can register your chat on twubs.com but NO ONE can own a hashtag (since anyone can type and use them). It’s important for your hashtag to be unique. If you see a hashtag that was once used but is no longer, you can always ask the original parties who used it if it’s available, but better to select something no one is already using.

Twitter chats can take 3-4 hours a week to manage.
If you are starting one from scratch, ask some friends to join you when you launch!
You’ll need 6-10 questions – extra brownie points if you post them in advance to blog/social media for people to see and plan ahead!
Try to set a specific time for your chat every week & hold them regularly so people always know when to tune in – don’t forget that people need to be reminded, too
Also, do a recap / summary post after the chat for people who missed out.
You want to pick good questions that will produce good answers to help further the conversation! It’s like reverse engineering a blog post. Know what answers/discussions you are looking to have and work backwards to develop the questions that will get you there.
Consider adding a category to your blog for the twitter chats to keep an archive of the recaps
If you get stuck looking for a topic, ask your audience and give them credit for the idea
Be committed – it can take up to a year to develop a solid chat

A twitter chat is a lot like a talk show except everyone gets to answer at the same time – you need to keep things organized or a busy chat can easily get out of control. Use a format like Q1) … Q2)… and encourage your participants to use A1)…. A2) for their answers. Try to discourage hitting ‘reply’.

Twitter Chat tools
==================
Twubs.com
example: http://twubs.com/NPChat
Tweetchat.com
example: http://tweetchat.com/room/npchat
Tchat.io
example: http://www.tchat.io/rooms/npchat

TweetReach.com – get stats on last 100 tweets

When you attend a twitter chat and interact, you know you’re chatting with real people, not bots – you will usually pick up followers and not just random followers, but quality ones

Make a Twitter List based on your chats to help track people who are participating. Then you can engage with them during the week when the chat is not happening.

The main purpose (from a strategic viewpoint) of attending or running a twitter chat is to establish yourself as a leader or expert in that niche

Don’t be afraid to ask higher profile twitter users or users with a lot of influence who are related to your topic to join you in hosting one of your chats!

Oembed -allows you to embed tweets on your blog and/or website

Favorite your own tweets – it’s “bookmarking”! Then when people answer your questions, heart all of them. As soon as chat ends, take another 30-60 mins to go back to your profile “likes” and work backwards to find the answers to the questions. Right-click and select “copy link” and then unfavorite and then go to the next. Pick the 3-5 best answers!

Project on GitHub called ‘T’ sferik – twitter client for terminal: https://github.com/sferik/t

If you do host a chat, it’s highly recommended to add that information to your Twitter bio – when people click the hashtag, it will suggest people for them to follow

Promoting:
use the right social network to promote – think of your audience.
Best promotion is blog post. In your blog, try to include a feature/plugin that allows them to add the chat to their calendar.
Post about it in relevant groups, but ONLY if you are a giver / active participant. A little bit of generosity goes a long way.

Find out what your ‘niche’ is – what is that you do that makes you special! What is that you love, what kind of clients do you take on the most? Is there a theme or a pattern to how you spend your time or who you work with? Are there things that you are really good at?

Look at your twitter analytics – what do your followers / friends have in common? Is your account the right account to run this specific chat on? Make sure if you are going to run a chat – make sure it’s line with you, your areas of expertise, and your audience.

Repurpose content – look back at your old blog posts

_________________________________________
Thanks for helping with our show notes!
Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
James Tryon @jamestryon

The post WPBlab EP75 – Marketing Your WordPress Niche with Twitter Chats appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPBlab EP74 – Nonprofit Event Marketing On Social: Tips & Tricks]]> Wed, 24 May 2017 18:03:32 GMT 1:01:15 no

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker share some tips and tricks for effective social media campaigns for your nonprofit's events.

Nonprofits are often short on time, money and are reliant on volunteer assistance to help things run

Geocoding and hashtags are two great ways to curate your event’s photos/marketing, etc.

Things that make crowdsourcing photos really easy:

  • Smartphone
  • Selfie stick (possibly with tripod!)
  • Public-facing social media

Re-gramming on Instagram is against the TOS so Twitter is often a better choice for sharing and re-sharing of photos. You can however, share links to the Instagram posts (on FB, Twitter, etc). Here’s an example. https://www.facebook.com/SoCalHiker/posts/10155307306634344

Both Twitter and Instagram posts can be embedded into your blog posts, which is a great way to get the word out and continue to motivate your attendees/volunteers and/or thank them!

You can also create an event gallery on Flickr that everyone can contribute to. Dropbox or Google Drive that multiple people have access to is a great option as well.

Be sure to thank your volunteers/contributors!!

You want to provide good information on social media because people will be looking for updates about the event, answers to questions, and wanting to know who is attending and what the event will be like. Think of the things that you take for granted and that someone new would not necessarily know. Always think “hospitality”.

Make sure your social media avatar shows your real face. People love to see faces and helps people to relate – it humanizes an event. Remember the names of your frequent attenders or volunteers and mention them by name when they arrive at your event.

Use ‘urgency’ in your marketing and peer sharing / FOMO (fear of missing out) factor

Tell a story: all non-profits exist to help humanity in some way and storytelling is a powerful marketing tool that resonates with people

When attending an event, always have an external battery or 2 or 3.

When doing photography for your event, keep in mind that you don’t have to edit every single photo. Make a few quick edits as needed, but then just share what you have.

Also remember that volunteers may not always have the tools available that they need to help out. Ie. photographers – you can have disposable or affordable cameras / phones available to let your volunteers use to contribute.

Ask your volunteers what they are into and see how that intersects with what they enjoy and are good at

Invest in your volunteers and they will stick with you!

There are lots of social media managers who are willing to do pro bono work for non-profits, so reach out to your networks and ask people you know to find someone to help you.

TOOLS:

Media Release form

Nonprofit Chat #npchat

Sponsors

Thanks for helping with our show notes!
Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
Doug Knoyle @dougster123
James Tryon @jamestryon
Jeff Hester @jeffhester

The post WPBlab EP74 – Nonprofit Event Marketing On Social: Tips & Tricks appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker share some tips and tricks for effective social media campaigns for your nonprofit's events.

Nonprofits are often short on time, money and are reliant on volunteer assistance to help things run

Geocoding and hashtags are two great ways to curate your event’s photos/marketing, etc.

Things that make crowdsourcing photos really easy:

  • Smartphone
  • Selfie stick (possibly with tripod!)
  • Public-facing social media

Re-gramming on Instagram is against the TOS so Twitter is often a better choice for sharing and re-sharing of photos. You can however, share links to the Instagram posts (on FB, Twitter, etc). Here’s an example. https://www.facebook.com/SoCalHiker/posts/10155307306634344

Both Twitter and Instagram posts can be embedded into your blog posts, which is a great way to get the word out and continue to motivate your attendees/volunteers and/or thank them!

You can also create an event gallery on Flickr that everyone can contribute to. Dropbox or Google Drive that multiple people have access to is a great option as well.

Be sure to thank your volunteers/contributors!!

You want to provide good information on social media because people will be looking for updates about the event, answers to questions, and wanting to know who is attending and what the event will be like. Think of the things that you take for granted and that someone new would not necessarily know. Always think “hospitality”.

Make sure your social media avatar shows your real face. People love to see faces and helps people to relate – it humanizes an event. Remember the names of your frequent attenders or volunteers and mention them by name when they arrive at your event.

Use ‘urgency’ in your marketing and peer sharing / FOMO (fear of missing out) factor

Tell a story: all non-profits exist to help humanity in some way and storytelling is a powerful marketing tool that resonates with people

When attending an event, always have an external battery or 2 or 3.

When doing photography for your event, keep in mind that you don’t have to edit every single photo. Make a few quick edits as needed, but then just share what you have.

Also remember that volunteers may not always have the tools available that they need to help out. Ie. photographers – you can have disposable or affordable cameras / phones available to let your volunteers use to contribute.

Ask your volunteers what they are into and see how that intersects with what they enjoy and are good at

Invest in your volunteers and they will stick with you!

There are lots of social media managers who are willing to do pro bono work for non-profits, so reach out to your networks and ask people you know to find someone to help you.

TOOLS:

Media Release form

Nonprofit Chat #npchat

Sponsors

Thanks for helping with our show notes!
Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
Doug Knoyle @dougster123
James Tryon @jamestryon
Jeff Hester @jeffhester

The post WPBlab EP74 – Nonprofit Event Marketing On Social: Tips & Tricks appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP73 – WordPress Freelancers: Optimize Your Time With Social Tools]]> Thu, 18 May 2017 20:16:14 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be discussing the ways in which you can manage social media using 3rd party tools to help you the WordPress freelancer spend less time doing more.

  • Sharing buttons on your blog/site are super important – not everyone is going to have or install extensions to help them share your posts

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
Doug Knoyle @dougster123

The post WPblab EP73 – WordPress Freelancers: Optimize Your Time With Social Tools appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be discussing the ways in which you can manage social media using 3rd party tools to help you the WordPress freelancer spend less time doing more.

  • Sharing buttons on your blog/site are super important – not everyone is going to have or install extensions to help them share your posts

Thanks for helping with our show notes!

Cheryl LaPrade @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade @heysherie
Doug Knoyle @dougster123

The post WPblab EP73 – WordPress Freelancers: Optimize Your Time With Social Tools appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP72 – WordPress Plugins – If you build it, will they come?]]> Thu, 27 Apr 2017 04:08:54 GMT 0 no

WPblab EP72 – WordPress Plugins – If you build it, will they come? w/ Russell Aaron
Russell Aaron – Web Dev Studios

Bridget – Actions do things, Filters change things

What’s a plugin? – File inside directory. Adds or enhance website, or de-enhance, Simmer down down.

Finish plugin, ship it and call it a day!

Built & tested and released, people are installing and then white screen the site

First step in marketing, believe in product. Use it every day. Plugin solves his own problem.

His marketing – let me to take it to a competition at a WordCamp ( Plugin-a-Palooza ) and get an idea of who is my core demographic

How do you promote?

No good marketing thing on the repo… The repo has copy… Real people don’t know repo. Directory good compromise for users.

Have a good call to action. Make sense in your copy. Have someone else write the copy. Don’t use terms dev terms. Use words your audience will understand.

No one is looking for the product by your name.

Users look for Automatic scheduling twitter. “Revival posts” not the name you’re searching for.

Use descriptive copy in the repository listing… it may sound like an infomercial but you need to use words that the audience will easily understand.

Listen to people in meetup groups. People want to see a top level view of their site, top “query all the posts types” came up.
What are people saying about your plugins and how do you tap into that?

Get close to pain points essential to marketing. Finding the thing that people ask about over and over again is a good guide to what you should be talking / posting about.

Word of Mouth. People willing to try things. WordCamp people will experiment about things and new products.

Intro with “Hi my name is russ and you might like my plugin ‘query all the post types’”

Use your community to make your plugin better.

User feedback. Take it to meetup group. Discounts for early adopters

First step of marketing is help evolve the plugin

“I need something to do – how can I solve a problem?” Combine those things together and a plugin is born!

Don’t get too used car salesman. Somewhere between peace corps and something…..

If you make a plugin and put it in the repo, you’re going to get a lot of questions and suggestions for changes to make it better

For a tweet about styling gravity forms. Meghan said “shutup and take my money”. Had an idea and built a plugin to just enqueue a stylesheet.

Don’t wait tooo long to make premium version of plugin

You need a marketing brief – Set achievable, measureable goals. I want 10 downloads a month.

Goal 500 or 1000 active installs – figure out how to get that.

  • Get on twitter.
  • Tweet 3 times a day.
  • Make sure to hit ‘reply’.
  • Be a human being
  • Organic content marketing
  • Community advertising
  • Be on every front possible
  • 4 times a week posts on the blog

Have a strategy
Tell people you exist. You won't make a living for at least 3 years on only the plugin.

Russell: If you write something that solves a problem and you tweet it with the right hashtags and get it in front of the right people – it can almost promote itself! People are going to share it.

Bridget: Be a Human Being. Develop relationships. Then it will matter to people when you share projects you are working on.

James Law ( Ninja Forms ) charge what it is. Don’t do discounts.

Russell’s marketing strategy – I want to help people. If I can get on a show or got to a meetup and share something that helps, I’m doing my job

Show people that you are not one-dimensional – that you are more than just WordPress – that you have interests and other activities that people can connect to — people gravitate towards authenticity

A plugin should do one thing and one thing well.

We all need each other – no WordPress website has only one plugin.

Russ: Jetpack does many things, but it does them reliably. If people would stop bashing it and just give it a chance and see what it really can do – they’d see its worth.

Russ: you have to be willing to have conversations and be interested in what they're saying. Bridget need help, how can you help her?

Russ: Be a better role model. Write plugins, reach out to AWP group and answer valid questions. Success = Help someone out there that needs to help without being there.

Success in a nutshell – plugin solves a problem and the community is better off for it.

Bridget: Tooting horn is marketing

Marketing is a necessary part of any business model.

Plugins need to be seen as legitimate.

Everyone who participates elevates the brand!

Bridget: Leo Laporte. Follow him! TWiT|Netcasts you love from people you trustLeo Laporte – Broadcaster, podcaster, tech pundit. Founder, TWiT Netcast Network. The Tech Guy on the Premiere radio network MacBreak Weekly. This week in Tech

As you become a better role model you get a stamp of approval. Seen as trusted.

Bridget: Start blogging about events

Let people know that you’re involved in the space

Start talking about your plugin on your blog

Search Results for “brad parbs”
bradp (Brad Parbs) / Repositories

Marketing is kinda like SEO. target a group or someone well, then you can change it later.

Marketing is telling something instead of pitching
Let me tell you how this car is going to help your family down the road.

Wrote a plugin, enter it into a contest and the marketing solved itself.

Doing stuff in the community and WordCamp talks is allowing you to pimp your brand.

Do twitter for 5 minutes. Be successful.

Sing Papa Roch!

Thanks for helping with the show notes:

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP72 – WordPress Plugins – If you build it, will they come? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

WPblab EP72 – WordPress Plugins – If you build it, will they come? w/ Russell Aaron
Russell Aaron – Web Dev Studios

Bridget – Actions do things, Filters change things

What’s a plugin? – File inside directory. Adds or enhance website, or de-enhance, Simmer down down.

Finish plugin, ship it and call it a day!

Built & tested and released, people are installing and then white screen the site

First step in marketing, believe in product. Use it every day. Plugin solves his own problem.

His marketing – let me to take it to a competition at a WordCamp ( Plugin-a-Palooza ) and get an idea of who is my core demographic

How do you promote?

No good marketing thing on the repo… The repo has copy… Real people don’t know repo. Directory good compromise for users.

Have a good call to action. Make sense in your copy. Have someone else write the copy. Don’t use terms dev terms. Use words your audience will understand.

No one is looking for the product by your name.

Users look for Automatic scheduling twitter. “Revival posts” not the name you’re searching for.

Use descriptive copy in the repository listing… it may sound like an infomercial but you need to use words that the audience will easily understand.

Listen to people in meetup groups. People want to see a top level view of their site, top “query all the posts types” came up.
What are people saying about your plugins and how do you tap into that?

Get close to pain points essential to marketing. Finding the thing that people ask about over and over again is a good guide to what you should be talking / posting about.

Word of Mouth. People willing to try things. WordCamp people will experiment about things and new products.

Intro with “Hi my name is russ and you might like my plugin ‘query all the post types’”

Use your community to make your plugin better.

User feedback. Take it to meetup group. Discounts for early adopters

First step of marketing is help evolve the plugin

“I need something to do – how can I solve a problem?” Combine those things together and a plugin is born!

Don’t get too used car salesman. Somewhere between peace corps and something…..

If you make a plugin and put it in the repo, you’re going to get a lot of questions and suggestions for changes to make it better

For a tweet about styling gravity forms. Meghan said “shutup and take my money”. Had an idea and built a plugin to just enqueue a stylesheet.

Don’t wait tooo long to make premium version of plugin

You need a marketing brief – Set achievable, measureable goals. I want 10 downloads a month.

Goal 500 or 1000 active installs – figure out how to get that.

  • Get on twitter.
  • Tweet 3 times a day.
  • Make sure to hit ‘reply’.
  • Be a human being
  • Organic content marketing
  • Community advertising
  • Be on every front possible
  • 4 times a week posts on the blog

Have a strategy
Tell people you exist. You won't make a living for at least 3 years on only the plugin.

Russell: If you write something that solves a problem and you tweet it with the right hashtags and get it in front of the right people – it can almost promote itself! People are going to share it.

Bridget: Be a Human Being. Develop relationships. Then it will matter to people when you share projects you are working on.

James Law ( Ninja Forms ) charge what it is. Don’t do discounts.

Russell’s marketing strategy – I want to help people. If I can get on a show or got to a meetup and share something that helps, I’m doing my job

Show people that you are not one-dimensional – that you are more than just WordPress – that you have interests and other activities that people can connect to — people gravitate towards authenticity

A plugin should do one thing and one thing well.

We all need each other – no WordPress website has only one plugin.

Russ: Jetpack does many things, but it does them reliably. If people would stop bashing it and just give it a chance and see what it really can do – they’d see its worth.

Russ: you have to be willing to have conversations and be interested in what they're saying. Bridget need help, how can you help her?

Russ: Be a better role model. Write plugins, reach out to AWP group and answer valid questions. Success = Help someone out there that needs to help without being there.

Success in a nutshell – plugin solves a problem and the community is better off for it.

Bridget: Tooting horn is marketing

Marketing is a necessary part of any business model.

Plugins need to be seen as legitimate.

Everyone who participates elevates the brand!

Bridget: Leo Laporte. Follow him! TWiT|Netcasts you love from people you trustLeo Laporte – Broadcaster, podcaster, tech pundit. Founder, TWiT Netcast Network. The Tech Guy on the Premiere radio network MacBreak Weekly. This week in Tech

As you become a better role model you get a stamp of approval. Seen as trusted.

Bridget: Start blogging about events

Let people know that you’re involved in the space

Start talking about your plugin on your blog

Search Results for “brad parbs”
bradp (Brad Parbs) / Repositories

Marketing is kinda like SEO. target a group or someone well, then you can change it later.

Marketing is telling something instead of pitching
Let me tell you how this car is going to help your family down the road.

Wrote a plugin, enter it into a contest and the marketing solved itself.

Doing stuff in the community and WordCamp talks is allowing you to pimp your brand.

Do twitter for 5 minutes. Be successful.

Sing Papa Roch!

Thanks for helping with the show notes:

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP72 – WordPress Plugins – If you build it, will they come? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP69 – Using Twitter to market your WordPress side hustle]]> Thu, 06 Apr 2017 03:37:26 GMT 57:40 no

This week on WPblab we're talking with Sherie & Cheryl LaPrade about using Twitter to market your WordPress side hustle. If you run your own business and you are looking for ways to market it, this show will be perfect for you.

The post WPblab EP69 – Using Twitter to market your WordPress side hustle appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we're talking with Sherie & Cheryl LaPrade about using Twitter to market your WordPress side hustle. If you run your own business and you are looking for ways to market it, this show will be perfect for you.

The post WPblab EP69 – Using Twitter to market your WordPress side hustle appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[EP68 – Podcasting to build WordPress Community w/ David Blackmon]]> Thu, 30 Mar 2017 21:45:24 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab we're at a new time 7-8pm Pacific and will be talking with David Blackmon about his Divi Chat podcast and how he used his show to build community around Divi page builder and Elegant Themes.

David Blackmon – Divi Chat http://divi.chat/

How to start a WordPress podcast

Started in a Facebook group, many folks helping one another in there talking about WordPress and Divi

Decided to have a meetup and 15-20 people showed up from around the world!  Nick – founder of ElegantThemes – came down with his team and hung out as well.

David had a great love for podcasts and saw the potential in it – great medium, easily consumable, a great marketing vehicle to get a message out

Was originally going to start his own podcast, but when he met  up with a bunch of his online WordPress and Divi friends in person, he decided to start a show similar to WP Watercooler, but about the Divi platform  (Using YouTube Live – also uploads the audio to iTunes)

Google Spreadsheet with topics listed for upcoming episodes – 30 to 90 days out

Getting guests can be tricky, especially if you like to plan ahead – be prepared for cancellations

http://roadtreking.com/category/podcasts/ – Mike Wendland (great example of a well put together podcast)

His new show: wpthepodcast.com

Podcasts are a great way to meet and get connected with the larger community, make new friends and network – often get recognized by your voice in a crowd!

MacCast – Adam Christianson – has a very distinctive voice! Met many people because they recognized his voice from his podcast.

Soundcloud is another good site to upload your podcast audio to and get greater reach

Some very ‘Festive’ episodes with Google’s effects, ie. Party Hats etc. Had lots of laughs, but probably lost some of the audience in the audio version because they couldn’t see what was happening on screen – have to remember the audio audience when doing your podcast

YouTube is great because it shows you the exact viewcount of who saw the video when it aired.  You can also see comments, interactions, and how much they saw of each episode

If you aren’t doing closed captioning, you may miss out on some of the people trying to watch the podcast video  www.Rev.com – transcription, captions and translations

Facebook live is useful because it will alert people when something goes Live … people may not be looking for it, but it pops up and they go “Hey, I’m gonna watch this!”

Know where your ‘community’ watches you from … if most of your people find you and watch you via facebook, focus your efforts there …. If most follow you and interact via YouTube, focus there instead

Facebook – comments matter – make sure you are engaging.  Not just liking.  “You have to use words to build relationships” – Bridget  … Sharing is important and helpful too, but it’s still not engagement – you still need to comment to build those relationships.

If you genuinely want to build engagement on Facebook, you need to spend at least an hour a day commenting and replying to comments – furthering the conversation & relationship!

www.yt2fb.com “Make your YouTube Video look BIG and AWESOME on Facebook” -makes YouTube videos look semi-native when posted to Facebook

When you are starting a podcast, people are expecting perfection from the get-go … you should take some time to record “Episode Zero” – you know you are going to throw it away, but it gives you a chance to do a run through and feel out what works and what doesn’t and possibly shift direction if needed

http://wpmedia.pro/

http://wpmedia.pro/the-10-commandments-of-podcasting-that-work/

https://omnystudio.com/ On demand audio publishing platform –  podcast hosting and tools

Enhanced podcasts – post-production is about 30 minutes on average

David – cofounder Aspen Grove Studios http://www.aspengrovestudios.com

Thank you for helping us with the show notes this week:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl on Twitter

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie on Twitter

The post EP68 – Podcasting to build WordPress Community w/ David Blackmon appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we're at a new time 7-8pm Pacific and will be talking with David Blackmon about his Divi Chat podcast and how he used his show to build community around Divi page builder and Elegant Themes.

David Blackmon – Divi Chat http://divi.chat/

How to start a WordPress podcast

Started in a Facebook group, many folks helping one another in there talking about WordPress and Divi

Decided to have a meetup and 15-20 people showed up from around the world!  Nick – founder of ElegantThemes – came down with his team and hung out as well.

David had a great love for podcasts and saw the potential in it – great medium, easily consumable, a great marketing vehicle to get a message out

Was originally going to start his own podcast, but when he met  up with a bunch of his online WordPress and Divi friends in person, he decided to start a show similar to WP Watercooler, but about the Divi platform  (Using YouTube Live – also uploads the audio to iTunes)

Google Spreadsheet with topics listed for upcoming episodes – 30 to 90 days out

Getting guests can be tricky, especially if you like to plan ahead – be prepared for cancellations

http://roadtreking.com/category/podcasts/ – Mike Wendland (great example of a well put together podcast)

His new show: wpthepodcast.com

Podcasts are a great way to meet and get connected with the larger community, make new friends and network – often get recognized by your voice in a crowd!

MacCast – Adam Christianson – has a very distinctive voice! Met many people because they recognized his voice from his podcast.

Soundcloud is another good site to upload your podcast audio to and get greater reach

Some very ‘Festive’ episodes with Google’s effects, ie. Party Hats etc. Had lots of laughs, but probably lost some of the audience in the audio version because they couldn’t see what was happening on screen – have to remember the audio audience when doing your podcast

YouTube is great because it shows you the exact viewcount of who saw the video when it aired.  You can also see comments, interactions, and how much they saw of each episode

If you aren’t doing closed captioning, you may miss out on some of the people trying to watch the podcast video  www.Rev.com – transcription, captions and translations

Facebook live is useful because it will alert people when something goes Live … people may not be looking for it, but it pops up and they go “Hey, I’m gonna watch this!”

Know where your ‘community’ watches you from … if most of your people find you and watch you via facebook, focus your efforts there …. If most follow you and interact via YouTube, focus there instead

Facebook – comments matter – make sure you are engaging.  Not just liking.  “You have to use words to build relationships” – Bridget  … Sharing is important and helpful too, but it’s still not engagement – you still need to comment to build those relationships.

If you genuinely want to build engagement on Facebook, you need to spend at least an hour a day commenting and replying to comments – furthering the conversation & relationship!

www.yt2fb.com “Make your YouTube Video look BIG and AWESOME on Facebook” -makes YouTube videos look semi-native when posted to Facebook

When you are starting a podcast, people are expecting perfection from the get-go … you should take some time to record “Episode Zero” – you know you are going to throw it away, but it gives you a chance to do a run through and feel out what works and what doesn’t and possibly shift direction if needed

http://wpmedia.pro/

http://wpmedia.pro/the-10-commandments-of-podcasting-that-work/

https://omnystudio.com/ On demand audio publishing platform –  podcast hosting and tools

Enhanced podcasts – post-production is about 30 minutes on average

David – cofounder Aspen Grove Studios http://www.aspengrovestudios.com

Thank you for helping us with the show notes this week:

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl on Twitter

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie on Twitter

The post EP68 – Podcasting to build WordPress Community w/ David Blackmon appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP67 – Learning WordPress Development with WPShout]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 03:32:09 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with WPShout about learning to do WordPress development. If you are looking to be a WordPress developer this should be the perfect episode for you.

http://www.wpshout.com
David B Hayes and Fred Meyer – WordPress developers, contributors, and enthusiasts. Our goal is to make the world of WordPress accessible to everybody.

Alex Denning – started publishing about WordPress development on WPShout in 2009

One of their projects for meditation – http://medivate.com

WPShout – mostly writing for people who are learning or who already are developers – not aimed at beginners

David writes a quick guide every Thursday for simple tips and suggestions

Good starting place for someone wanting to get into development – Up and Running – step by step introduction to WordPress development
Up and Running  – Discount code: WPBLAB – 20% off any package!! If you purchase before end of 3/24, you’ll also be entered to win some cool prizes!

Up and Running starts with the core technical fundamentals (and terminology) and breaks it down into a factory analogy to make it easier to understand the process … (Up and Running synthesizes WordPress development into a cohesive package)

The goal is to go from knowing about the concepts (html, css, php, wordpress basics, etc.) to becoming proficient and knowing how to use all the pieces and parts, and why & how they work, by the end of the program

“Everyone should use CMS’s and WordPress is the best one, so use it!”

Recorded a number of interviews with well known WP devs about how they got to where they are – Pippin Williamson, Helen Hou-Sandi, etc.

Screenflow is used for their video screen capture

Even if you never do the coding stuff or that’s not your focus, the hope is that Up and Running helps make it easier to understand the concepts and why it works the way it does – great for Designers too looking to level up their understanding

David started using WordPress in 2007 – learned how to be a web developer by having a website and wanting to make little changes here and there and beating his head against the wall – it was something he cared about strongly so making it better was important to him

WordPress is a great way to break into the entire field of Web Development

Learn WordPress Plugin Development

Some of the best ways to learn are to use Google to search for answers and to really dig through the Codex or the Code Reference

People come to WordPress from so many different backgrounds – sometimes it’s a nurse or an educator or a business person who was the most tech savvy in their office and they ‘inherited’ the site and the responsibility to market it

One of the most under-valued skills that most people in the tech field have is that they know how to use Google just a little bit better than everyone else!! You might have the ability to get an answer in 2 minutes that may take a non-technical person an hour to find. That’s worth a whole lot!

One of the first and easier plugins you could tackle is a shortcode plugin – will teach you some of the basics of the hook system / registering a plugin, etc.

One of the greatest ways to start learning PHP is to start with creating a child theme – it’s pretty safe and pretty easy to get started

If you can safely “cowboy code” your website – it’s one of the best first steps to getting started with WordPress development… you get immediate feedback from the work you put in – a local development environment is great and you should use it as a professional, but for the beginner dev, it can be overkill

Local Development – DesktopServer

Text editing

Thanks for helping us with the show notes

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl on Twitter
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie on Twitter
✩ Twitter – http://twitter.com/wpwatercooler
✩ Blog/Website – https://www.wpwatercooler.com
✩ Facebook- http://www.facebook.com/wpwatercooler
✩ Podcast RSS Feed – https://www.wpwatercooler.com/feed
✩ iTunes – wpwatercooler.com/itunes
✩ Stitcher – http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/wpwatercooler
✩ Soundcloud – https://soundcloud.com/wpwatercooler
✩ Google+ – https://www.google.com/+WPwatercooler

The post WPblab EP67 – Learning WordPress Development with WPShout appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with WPShout about learning to do WordPress development. If you are looking to be a WordPress developer this should be the perfect episode for you.

http://www.wpshout.com
David B Hayes and Fred Meyer – WordPress developers, contributors, and enthusiasts. Our goal is to make the world of WordPress accessible to everybody.

Alex Denning – started publishing about WordPress development on WPShout in 2009

One of their projects for meditation – http://medivate.com

WPShout – mostly writing for people who are learning or who already are developers – not aimed at beginners

David writes a quick guide every Thursday for simple tips and suggestions

Good starting place for someone wanting to get into development – Up and Running – step by step introduction to WordPress development
Up and Running  – Discount code: WPBLAB – 20% off any package!! If you purchase before end of 3/24, you’ll also be entered to win some cool prizes!

Up and Running starts with the core technical fundamentals (and terminology) and breaks it down into a factory analogy to make it easier to understand the process … (Up and Running synthesizes WordPress development into a cohesive package)

The goal is to go from knowing about the concepts (html, css, php, wordpress basics, etc.) to becoming proficient and knowing how to use all the pieces and parts, and why & how they work, by the end of the program

“Everyone should use CMS’s and WordPress is the best one, so use it!”

Recorded a number of interviews with well known WP devs about how they got to where they are – Pippin Williamson, Helen Hou-Sandi, etc.

Screenflow is used for their video screen capture

Even if you never do the coding stuff or that’s not your focus, the hope is that Up and Running helps make it easier to understand the concepts and why it works the way it does – great for Designers too looking to level up their understanding

David started using WordPress in 2007 – learned how to be a web developer by having a website and wanting to make little changes here and there and beating his head against the wall – it was something he cared about strongly so making it better was important to him

WordPress is a great way to break into the entire field of Web Development

Learn WordPress Plugin Development

Some of the best ways to learn are to use Google to search for answers and to really dig through the Codex or the Code Reference

People come to WordPress from so many different backgrounds – sometimes it’s a nurse or an educator or a business person who was the most tech savvy in their office and they ‘inherited’ the site and the responsibility to market it

One of the most under-valued skills that most people in the tech field have is that they know how to use Google just a little bit better than everyone else!! You might have the ability to get an answer in 2 minutes that may take a non-technical person an hour to find. That’s worth a whole lot!

One of the first and easier plugins you could tackle is a shortcode plugin – will teach you some of the basics of the hook system / registering a plugin, etc.

One of the greatest ways to start learning PHP is to start with creating a child theme – it’s pretty safe and pretty easy to get started

If you can safely “cowboy code” your website – it’s one of the best first steps to getting started with WordPress development… you get immediate feedback from the work you put in – a local development environment is great and you should use it as a professional, but for the beginner dev, it can be overkill

Local Development – DesktopServer

Text editing

Thanks for helping us with the show notes

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl on Twitter
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie on Twitter
✩ Twitter – http://twitter.com/wpwatercooler
✩ Blog/Website – https://www.wpwatercooler.com
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✩ Google+ – https://www.google.com/+WPwatercooler

The post WPblab EP67 – Learning WordPress Development with WPShout appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP66 – Marketing Yourself by Live Tweeting at WordCamp]]> Thu, 09 Mar 2017 03:25:41 GMT 0 no

This week Bridget and Jen Miller discuss how you can market yourself by live tweeting a WordCamp

Live Tweeting at WordCamp

Bridget Willard

You Too Can Be A Guru

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u

Offering Lead Conversion Tools and Blogging

Need Someone To Blog? 100% Unique Website Content. Need Safe Blog Posts? Hire a Ghost Blogger…

Jen – been using twitter for 6 years
finally realized twitter is a relationship building medium
Jen wanted to be a Guru too

Bridget – in 2012 was helping with a political campaign
She would listen over the internet and tweet out quotes with relevant hashtags to help with exposure
When she finally made it to a WordCamp, it seemed so obvious that Live Tweeting would be a thing you should do

Bridget’s tips & tricks:

You Too Can Be A Guru

Find out the official hashtag for the conference you are at, and if there isn’t one, make up one that makes sense, but try to make sure it’s not already being used

Find out who speakers are and their Twitter handles
Some WordCamps have speaker twitter lists that you can follow

A good plan to have a document local on your device with your information / schedule – not all
WordCamps have wi-fi and not all wi-fi is dependable! Also bring a powerstrip – good for you and is the ultimate “friend-maker”! Take your own personal hotspot and name it well – brand it with your business name – may bring new contacts.

WHAT YOU DON’T DO – be careful not to mistype the twitter handles of the speakers

Copy the hashtag of the event and the twitter handle of the speaker and load it into the tweet box and wait for those “tweetable moments. Then when they come along, you can just add in the text and send!

These speakers are giving of their time and are unpaid – If you can amplify what the speaker is saying to that room and get it to more people – not only are you helping them, but you are helping yourself too!

Live-tweeting doesn’t make it harder for you to pay attention – if you are listening carefully for those tweetable moments, you are paying even closer attention than normal and potentially absorbing more than you would without live-tweeting

Live-tweeting is also really helpful for those “Armchair WordCampers” who weren’t able to make it to the event, but still try to follow along during the weekend

​Twubs Is good for following hashtags ​twubs.com Follow Hashtags. Discover Conversations.

If there is closed-captioning at the event, you can use it to double-check your tweets and make sure you’re not misquoting anyone

Make sure that you are using an accurate photo of yourself on twitter so that people will recognize you when you attend WordCamps! Also, start watching the hashtag for the camp as soon as it’s available so you can interact with other attendees and develop relationships!

Get to know your fellow attendees before the event, what your interests are, the work you do, and even just general chit-chat — helps to break the ice when you finally meet in person! Especially if you are from out of town and don’t know anyone.

Save a list of great quotes from the different sessions you attend, especially ones that are too long or just too good to use for only Twitter and use them as the base for a blog post/recap of the event

If you can get images of the person speaking as well as a quote, that’s very valuable. Lots of people will tweet quotes, but not everyone will get a good picture!

You can even help WordCamp organizers by tweeting out the WIFI name, and location of afterparties, etc.

Make your goals achievable – Try to find ONE thing you can quote – the one thing that resonates with you…. And tweet that out

If you’re not quick enough to get the exact quote from a speaker, it’s okay to rephrase or summarize it in your own words, and even add your thoughts

Make sure to give context to your tweets – if someone doesn’t know what you are talking about, then they can’t respond!

The Next Chapter-Blog

Bridget: My friends, my family, my career are all at WordPress. It all started in June 2013 at WordCamp Orange County. If that’s not convincing, I don’t know what could be!
“I found my tribe” via WordPress and live tweeting

___________________
Show Note Contributors

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Paul Oyler – @PappyOyler

The post WPblab EP66 – Marketing Yourself by Live Tweeting at WordCamp appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week Bridget and Jen Miller discuss how you can market yourself by live tweeting a WordCamp

Live Tweeting at WordCamp

Bridget Willard

You Too Can Be A Guru

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u

Offering Lead Conversion Tools and Blogging

Need Someone To Blog? 100% Unique Website Content. Need Safe Blog Posts? Hire a Ghost Blogger…

Jen – been using twitter for 6 years
finally realized twitter is a relationship building medium
Jen wanted to be a Guru too

Bridget – in 2012 was helping with a political campaign
She would listen over the internet and tweet out quotes with relevant hashtags to help with exposure
When she finally made it to a WordCamp, it seemed so obvious that Live Tweeting would be a thing you should do

Bridget’s tips & tricks:

You Too Can Be A Guru

Find out the official hashtag for the conference you are at, and if there isn’t one, make up one that makes sense, but try to make sure it’s not already being used

Find out who speakers are and their Twitter handles
Some WordCamps have speaker twitter lists that you can follow

A good plan to have a document local on your device with your information / schedule – not all
WordCamps have wi-fi and not all wi-fi is dependable! Also bring a powerstrip – good for you and is the ultimate “friend-maker”! Take your own personal hotspot and name it well – brand it with your business name – may bring new contacts.

WHAT YOU DON’T DO – be careful not to mistype the twitter handles of the speakers

Copy the hashtag of the event and the twitter handle of the speaker and load it into the tweet box and wait for those “tweetable moments. Then when they come along, you can just add in the text and send!

These speakers are giving of their time and are unpaid – If you can amplify what the speaker is saying to that room and get it to more people – not only are you helping them, but you are helping yourself too!

Live-tweeting doesn’t make it harder for you to pay attention – if you are listening carefully for those tweetable moments, you are paying even closer attention than normal and potentially absorbing more than you would without live-tweeting

Live-tweeting is also really helpful for those “Armchair WordCampers” who weren’t able to make it to the event, but still try to follow along during the weekend

​Twubs Is good for following hashtags ​twubs.com Follow Hashtags. Discover Conversations.

If there is closed-captioning at the event, you can use it to double-check your tweets and make sure you’re not misquoting anyone

Make sure that you are using an accurate photo of yourself on twitter so that people will recognize you when you attend WordCamps! Also, start watching the hashtag for the camp as soon as it’s available so you can interact with other attendees and develop relationships!

Get to know your fellow attendees before the event, what your interests are, the work you do, and even just general chit-chat — helps to break the ice when you finally meet in person! Especially if you are from out of town and don’t know anyone.

Save a list of great quotes from the different sessions you attend, especially ones that are too long or just too good to use for only Twitter and use them as the base for a blog post/recap of the event

If you can get images of the person speaking as well as a quote, that’s very valuable. Lots of people will tweet quotes, but not everyone will get a good picture!

You can even help WordCamp organizers by tweeting out the WIFI name, and location of afterparties, etc.

Make your goals achievable – Try to find ONE thing you can quote – the one thing that resonates with you…. And tweet that out

If you’re not quick enough to get the exact quote from a speaker, it’s okay to rephrase or summarize it in your own words, and even add your thoughts

Make sure to give context to your tweets – if someone doesn’t know what you are talking about, then they can’t respond!

The Next Chapter-Blog

Bridget: My friends, my family, my career are all at WordPress. It all started in June 2013 at WordCamp Orange County. If that’s not convincing, I don’t know what could be!
“I found my tribe” via WordPress and live tweeting

___________________
Show Note Contributors

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Paul Oyler – @PappyOyler

The post WPblab EP66 – Marketing Yourself by Live Tweeting at WordCamp appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP65 – Nonprofit Marketing With WordPress w/ Nathan Porter]]> Wed, 01 Mar 2017 23:44:45 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with Nathan Porter on how you can use WordPress effectively to market your nonprofit. Nathan is CEO wannapixel and cofounder of ukuupeople. Interact with him on his personal blog.

Components of a Nonprofit running WordPress

Intranet – their internal company site

Nonprofits are just like companies in that they have specific niches they are working with

Nonprofits have two separate spheres they have to operate in – one is fundraising – the other is their cause, can be difficult to balance

Marketing – “Who is it that we are trying to target online and what action is that we want them to take?”

GiveWP only runs with WordPress – it is difficult to market something that only works if you have something else – important to educate (how do you start a site, buying a domain name, setting up WordPress) https://givewp.com/

Build Infrastructure

CRM plugin for WordPress – help to keep your contacts updated. Everytime they interact with your WordPress website and provide more information, their contact info is updated. http://ukuupeople.com/

You need to have the infrastructure in place to be able to do good marketing for your nonprofit

Storytelling

When you are close to the organization, it can be harder to tell your story in a way that makes sense to outsiders, so….

Landing page content is important – needs to make sense.  What is it that you (or your company) does? It needs to be clear … not ambiguous.  Know who you are targeting.  If you are trying to talk to everyone, you are talking to no one.

Put your fundraising message front and center.  Tell your story effectively – have to figure out how to get someone from just discovering your organization, to understanding, to connecting and to wanting to be a part and to support it

Don’t just assume you know your audience – track your stats, check analytics, find out who your real demographic is and then you can figure out the best way to reach them

Kevin Hoffman: ​I think sometimes WP devs choose proprietary software because they need out-of-the-box solutions and don't have time for setup/integration.

So my question is, what can marketing do to make the benefits of a WordPress solution more appealing than the convenience of an alternative?

Screen recording QA solutions

Marketing with WordPress.org

Donations

The thing that can be hardest for nonprofits to understand is the investment in marketing and the return they will get for that investment (often a long term investment)

Don’t increase your donation levels to increase donations, it’s counter-productive.  Instead, lower the donation levels, make it so easy to do that people don’t even think about it and your donations will increase.  Also, think about offering subscription donations, so that people don’t have to remember to come back and donate.

CRM

Having a CRM allows you to keep track of who’s giving what, and who’s been in contact with who – very important to keep track of who’s given during a campaign so you don’t ask twice. Also helps you track personal details and help you to make a more personal (“Human!”) approach.

Website is the center of the spoke – focus on the core

Social is the outer edges

Google Grants

Social Media

Landing pages for non profits?

Think strategically about where you efforts are best placed, is a landing page the best idea for your organization?

Stay true to who you are as an organization, if it feels uncomfortable or awkward – don’t do it!

The way that you engage with an audience is much the same as the way you engage with your friends – don’t go for the “shiny new thing” – think of it on a personal level, how you would relate face to face

Marketing is a long term investment – you may not immediately see the payoff, but need to stick with it

Use Hootsuite for social media and do post approvals from your social media volunteers

Google Sheet for building out posts for social media

When developing your ‘voice’ for social media, it’s a good idea to do ‘peer reviews’ of the posts at the beginning to ensure consistency

Wendy’s Roast me

It’s hard to be trustworthy and snarky on social – better to avoid posts that would lead your trustworthiness to be questioned. Exception would be if you are an edgy company that deals in snark on a regular basis.

By 2030 You Will Lose Your Chance to Engage Millennial Donors

Millennials are largely interested in furthering their own personal cause – they are not interested in an organization that has been doing something for 100 years unless it fits with their own specific cause. They are not likely to be won over to another cause – it’s much easier to target them based on their specific (niche) interest

Special thanks to all these folks helping us with our show notes this episode

James Tryon – @jamestryon

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

Marisa Porter – @VirtuallyMarisa

 

The post WPblab EP65 – Nonprofit Marketing With WordPress w/ Nathan Porter appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with Nathan Porter on how you can use WordPress effectively to market your nonprofit. Nathan is CEO wannapixel and cofounder of ukuupeople. Interact with him on his personal blog.

Components of a Nonprofit running WordPress

Intranet – their internal company site

Nonprofits are just like companies in that they have specific niches they are working with

Nonprofits have two separate spheres they have to operate in – one is fundraising – the other is their cause, can be difficult to balance

Marketing – “Who is it that we are trying to target online and what action is that we want them to take?”

GiveWP only runs with WordPress – it is difficult to market something that only works if you have something else – important to educate (how do you start a site, buying a domain name, setting up WordPress) https://givewp.com/

Build Infrastructure

CRM plugin for WordPress – help to keep your contacts updated. Everytime they interact with your WordPress website and provide more information, their contact info is updated. http://ukuupeople.com/

You need to have the infrastructure in place to be able to do good marketing for your nonprofit

Storytelling

When you are close to the organization, it can be harder to tell your story in a way that makes sense to outsiders, so….

Landing page content is important – needs to make sense.  What is it that you (or your company) does? It needs to be clear … not ambiguous.  Know who you are targeting.  If you are trying to talk to everyone, you are talking to no one.

Put your fundraising message front and center.  Tell your story effectively – have to figure out how to get someone from just discovering your organization, to understanding, to connecting and to wanting to be a part and to support it

Don’t just assume you know your audience – track your stats, check analytics, find out who your real demographic is and then you can figure out the best way to reach them

Kevin Hoffman: ​I think sometimes WP devs choose proprietary software because they need out-of-the-box solutions and don't have time for setup/integration.

So my question is, what can marketing do to make the benefits of a WordPress solution more appealing than the convenience of an alternative?

Screen recording QA solutions

Marketing with WordPress.org

Donations

The thing that can be hardest for nonprofits to understand is the investment in marketing and the return they will get for that investment (often a long term investment)

Don’t increase your donation levels to increase donations, it’s counter-productive.  Instead, lower the donation levels, make it so easy to do that people don’t even think about it and your donations will increase.  Also, think about offering subscription donations, so that people don’t have to remember to come back and donate.

CRM

Having a CRM allows you to keep track of who’s giving what, and who’s been in contact with who – very important to keep track of who’s given during a campaign so you don’t ask twice. Also helps you track personal details and help you to make a more personal (“Human!”) approach.

Website is the center of the spoke – focus on the core

Social is the outer edges

Google Grants

Social Media

Landing pages for non profits?

Think strategically about where you efforts are best placed, is a landing page the best idea for your organization?

Stay true to who you are as an organization, if it feels uncomfortable or awkward – don’t do it!

The way that you engage with an audience is much the same as the way you engage with your friends – don’t go for the “shiny new thing” – think of it on a personal level, how you would relate face to face

Marketing is a long term investment – you may not immediately see the payoff, but need to stick with it

Use Hootsuite for social media and do post approvals from your social media volunteers

Google Sheet for building out posts for social media

When developing your ‘voice’ for social media, it’s a good idea to do ‘peer reviews’ of the posts at the beginning to ensure consistency

Wendy’s Roast me

It’s hard to be trustworthy and snarky on social – better to avoid posts that would lead your trustworthiness to be questioned. Exception would be if you are an edgy company that deals in snark on a regular basis.

By 2030 You Will Lose Your Chance to Engage Millennial Donors

Millennials are largely interested in furthering their own personal cause – they are not interested in an organization that has been doing something for 100 years unless it fits with their own specific cause. They are not likely to be won over to another cause – it’s much easier to target them based on their specific (niche) interest

Special thanks to all these folks helping us with our show notes this episode

James Tryon – @jamestryon

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

Marisa Porter – @VirtuallyMarisa

 

The post WPblab EP65 – Nonprofit Marketing With WordPress w/ Nathan Porter appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP64 – WordPress Community, the best thing to help you level up your career w/ Roy Sivan]]> Fri, 24 Feb 2017 02:32:14 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Roy Sivan about the best thing to help you level up your WordPress career.

Name Factoid:

Celtic Meaning: The name Roy is a Celtic baby name. In Celtic the meaning of the name Roy is: Red haired.

WP Crowd – WordPress community mastermind group / video show

Mastermind sundays at 6pm PST

WordPress community is very unique among tech communities because of the level of sharing … you can come in without knowing anything and level up from the ground up. Other communities can be judgy about beginner / entry-level questions.

Got a gig working for Disney because of a talk he gave at a WordCamp

Teaching other people in the WP community also helps you to level up because you get to know your subject matter better as you prepare to teach it

Church IT Roundtable http://citrt.com

Epoch – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time

Being open source makes WordPress and it’s community unique – people are more open and more generous with their knowledge and time. A great example: WordCamps – only $40 for a whole weekend (with lunches!) and you learn so much for so little

Having one code mentor is a great way to learn! But with the WordPress community you have hundreds of mentors!

MasterMinds:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chicceo/2013/10/21/7-reasons-to-join-a-mastermind-group/#535c4ddb5deb

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/featured/how-to-start-and-run-a-mastermind-group.html

Masterminds help you keep accountable – good way to level together in a smaller, more focused group

Try participating in local hackathons to push yourself a little further and learn more quickly

Get involved in your local meetup, they are always looking for speakers of all levels and you can learn so much from the other members.

Meetups can help you get out of shell – get used to speaking to a smaller group. It’s a good place to work on a new topic that you might want to one day present at a WordCamp in front of a larger audience.

Spend sometime outside of the WordPress spectrum – expose yourself to authors, podcasts, books, experts, etc. in adjacent interest areas that can help broaden your understanding (Get out of the bubble!)

Folks that helped us with our show notes

  • James Tryon – @jamestryon
  • Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
  • Adam Silver @heyadamsilver

 

The post WPblab EP64 – WordPress Community, the best thing to help you level up your career w/ Roy Sivan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Roy Sivan about the best thing to help you level up your WordPress career.

Name Factoid:

Celtic Meaning: The name Roy is a Celtic baby name. In Celtic the meaning of the name Roy is: Red haired.

WP Crowd – WordPress community mastermind group / video show

Mastermind sundays at 6pm PST

WordPress community is very unique among tech communities because of the level of sharing … you can come in without knowing anything and level up from the ground up. Other communities can be judgy about beginner / entry-level questions.

Got a gig working for Disney because of a talk he gave at a WordCamp

Teaching other people in the WP community also helps you to level up because you get to know your subject matter better as you prepare to teach it

Church IT Roundtable http://citrt.com

Epoch – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_time

Being open source makes WordPress and it’s community unique – people are more open and more generous with their knowledge and time. A great example: WordCamps – only $40 for a whole weekend (with lunches!) and you learn so much for so little

Having one code mentor is a great way to learn! But with the WordPress community you have hundreds of mentors!

MasterMinds:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chicceo/2013/10/21/7-reasons-to-join-a-mastermind-group/#535c4ddb5deb

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/featured/how-to-start-and-run-a-mastermind-group.html

Masterminds help you keep accountable – good way to level together in a smaller, more focused group

Try participating in local hackathons to push yourself a little further and learn more quickly

Get involved in your local meetup, they are always looking for speakers of all levels and you can learn so much from the other members.

Meetups can help you get out of shell – get used to speaking to a smaller group. It’s a good place to work on a new topic that you might want to one day present at a WordCamp in front of a larger audience.

Spend sometime outside of the WordPress spectrum – expose yourself to authors, podcasts, books, experts, etc. in adjacent interest areas that can help broaden your understanding (Get out of the bubble!)

Folks that helped us with our show notes

  • James Tryon – @jamestryon
  • Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
  • Adam Silver @heyadamsilver

 

The post WPblab EP64 – WordPress Community, the best thing to help you level up your career w/ Roy Sivan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP63 – Building WordPress plugins as a hobby w/ Andy Fragen]]> Thu, 16 Feb 2017 05:55:12 GMT 0 no

This week on WPblab we’ll be talking with surgeon Dr Andy Fragen about how he builds WordPress plugins as a hobby.

Andy Fragen
Geek Surgeon / Plugin Developer

Andy doesn't do WordPress during the day, he does it as a hobby

Scratching your own itch has lead to making some plugins for favorite things

Some people go home from a crazy day at work and do puzzles to unwind…
Coding is a puzzle – figuring out how to accomplish something or meet a need with a plugin

Started using Git/GitHub mainly for version control for his own purposes … not primarily seeking help/input to start

Rachelle Wise: I've written a bunch of plugins, but they've been mostly specific to client sites and haven't submitted anything yet, but I've been thinking about it. Any tips for submitting to the WP directory?
Andy Fragen: Use some batch script to make it easier – but definitely go for it! What’s the worse that could happen? You’ll have to support it 🙂

Use hooks, use filters, use the WordPress API

Try to test plugins in both single site and multi-site environments

Bridget: How do you handle support when it’s just a hobby / side job?
James Tryon: Brian Hogg had great advice about saying in the warranty “you only support the plugin on base WordPress with no other plugins installed and a default theme”… so you are not stuck with all the support

WordPress – Profiles – Andy Fragen

Great plugin:
Local Development

No meetups in Palm Springs?
There are some people who livestream their meetups – good alternative for people without a local meetup

Bridget: How do you start contributing?
Andy: Hang out in support forums and answer questions – if you have a product you really like, start there … more than one person has gotten hired by volunteering their time in support!

Use the proper tools – PHPstorm is a good one

 

Thanks to these people for helping us with these show notes!
Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
James Tryon – @jamestryon
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP63 – Building WordPress plugins as a hobby w/ Andy Fragen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we’ll be talking with surgeon Dr Andy Fragen about how he builds WordPress plugins as a hobby.

Andy Fragen
Geek Surgeon / Plugin Developer

Andy doesn't do WordPress during the day, he does it as a hobby

Scratching your own itch has lead to making some plugins for favorite things

Some people go home from a crazy day at work and do puzzles to unwind…
Coding is a puzzle – figuring out how to accomplish something or meet a need with a plugin

Started using Git/GitHub mainly for version control for his own purposes … not primarily seeking help/input to start

Rachelle Wise: I've written a bunch of plugins, but they've been mostly specific to client sites and haven't submitted anything yet, but I've been thinking about it. Any tips for submitting to the WP directory?
Andy Fragen: Use some batch script to make it easier – but definitely go for it! What’s the worse that could happen? You’ll have to support it 🙂

Use hooks, use filters, use the WordPress API

Try to test plugins in both single site and multi-site environments

Bridget: How do you handle support when it’s just a hobby / side job?
James Tryon: Brian Hogg had great advice about saying in the warranty “you only support the plugin on base WordPress with no other plugins installed and a default theme”… so you are not stuck with all the support

WordPress – Profiles – Andy Fragen

Great plugin:
Local Development

No meetups in Palm Springs?
There are some people who livestream their meetups – good alternative for people without a local meetup

Bridget: How do you start contributing?
Andy: Hang out in support forums and answer questions – if you have a product you really like, start there … more than one person has gotten hired by volunteering their time in support!

Use the proper tools – PHPstorm is a good one

 

Thanks to these people for helping us with these show notes!
Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
James Tryon – @jamestryon
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie

The post WPblab EP63 – Building WordPress plugins as a hobby w/ Andy Fragen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP62 – WordPress Social Media Marketing for Seniors w/ Cemal Tashan]]> Thu, 09 Feb 2017 03:21:07 GMT 1:22:15 no

EP62 – WordPress Social Media Marketing for Seniors

On this episode of WPblab we speak with Cemal Tashan about Social Media Marketing for Seniors.

Cemal Tashan: Designing for Seniors WordCamp OC Talk

Thanks for helping out with the show notes!
Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP62 – WordPress Social Media Marketing for Seniors w/ Cemal Tashan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

EP62 – WordPress Social Media Marketing for Seniors

On this episode of WPblab we speak with Cemal Tashan about Social Media Marketing for Seniors.

Cemal Tashan: Designing for Seniors WordCamp OC Talk

Thanks for helping out with the show notes!
Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP62 – WordPress Social Media Marketing for Seniors w/ Cemal Tashan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP61 – Building Your WordPress Freelancing by Speaking (or Teaching) w/Adam Silver]]> Thu, 02 Feb 2017 03:23:38 GMT 1:22:50 no

This week on WPblab we'll be joined by Adam Silver to how you can use public speaking to build your WordPress Freelancing business.

Adam Silver – Relax. We Got This|ConciergeWP.com
Podcasts

Adam Silver came to WordPress as a photographer because he needed to convert his own html site. Found he had a gift as a teacher – podcaster – speaker and started sharing his knowledge. One of his keys in warming up a room is sending softball questions to get conversation going.

Speaking to a live audience can be a benefit due to the immediate feedback you are able to get but scaling comes with online courses. Adam chose to get his own space and charge per student versus going through Adult Ed. The benefits of teaching a course are that people join his Meetup, take the class or hire him. People generally find him on the Meetup, on meetup.com and through his podcasts. He started using Ad Espresso to run Google adwords. Doing 25 miles within his location.

Bridget reminds that images without text perform better in Facebook advertising and says Twitter ads may be less expensive.

1st step if you want to talk at a WordCamp – Pitch it at a Meetup – reach out and ask if you can give your talk. Adam has adamislive.com and uses it anytime he speaks.

BTW WordPress has Speaker Training
Make WordPress Training

Adam’s “It’s Not a Hobby” Podcast coming soon – It's Not A Hobby
– sign up to be notified!

Class coming up in 20 days.

Self-advertising: Once a month Adam sponsors his own show – wouldn’t allow ads for the first 100 shows – wanted his audience to trust him

Adam loves to travel & loves to share and speak – he and his wife decided the best way to honor those two passions was to travel to more WordCamps – an investment but also a sacrifice (time away from family)

Your Website Engineer – Dustin Hartzler
“Helping you create a high quality WordPress website, by teaching you the skills to master WordPress.”
WordPress Resource:Your Website Engineer with Dustin Hartzler

The specific episode Adam was on: WordPress Resource

Show Note Contributors

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
James Tryon – @jamestryon
Verious Smith – @verioussmith
Robey Lawrence – @robeylawrence

The post WPblab EP61 – Building Your WordPress Freelancing by Speaking (or Teaching) w/Adam Silver appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be joined by Adam Silver to how you can use public speaking to build your WordPress Freelancing business.

Adam Silver – Relax. We Got This|ConciergeWP.com
Podcasts

Adam Silver came to WordPress as a photographer because he needed to convert his own html site. Found he had a gift as a teacher – podcaster – speaker and started sharing his knowledge. One of his keys in warming up a room is sending softball questions to get conversation going.

Speaking to a live audience can be a benefit due to the immediate feedback you are able to get but scaling comes with online courses. Adam chose to get his own space and charge per student versus going through Adult Ed. The benefits of teaching a course are that people join his Meetup, take the class or hire him. People generally find him on the Meetup, on meetup.com and through his podcasts. He started using Ad Espresso to run Google adwords. Doing 25 miles within his location.

Bridget reminds that images without text perform better in Facebook advertising and says Twitter ads may be less expensive.

1st step if you want to talk at a WordCamp – Pitch it at a Meetup – reach out and ask if you can give your talk. Adam has adamislive.com and uses it anytime he speaks.

BTW WordPress has Speaker Training
Make WordPress Training

Adam’s “It’s Not a Hobby” Podcast coming soon – It's Not A Hobby
– sign up to be notified!

Class coming up in 20 days.

Self-advertising: Once a month Adam sponsors his own show – wouldn’t allow ads for the first 100 shows – wanted his audience to trust him

Adam loves to travel & loves to share and speak – he and his wife decided the best way to honor those two passions was to travel to more WordCamps – an investment but also a sacrifice (time away from family)

Your Website Engineer – Dustin Hartzler
“Helping you create a high quality WordPress website, by teaching you the skills to master WordPress.”
WordPress Resource:Your Website Engineer with Dustin Hartzler

The specific episode Adam was on: WordPress Resource

Show Note Contributors

Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
James Tryon – @jamestryon
Verious Smith – @verioussmith
Robey Lawrence – @robeylawrence

The post WPblab EP61 – Building Your WordPress Freelancing by Speaking (or Teaching) w/Adam Silver appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP60 – Marketing Your WordPress Business on Instagram w/ Verious Smith III]]> Fri, 27 Jan 2017 00:15:35 GMT 1:27:05 no

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Verious Smith III who is Creative Director of Philoveracity Design out of Riverside California. On this episode, we will be speaking with him about marketing your WordPress business using Instagram.

Verious and Bridget met talking abouteyelashes and instagram waiting for a food truck at a WordCamp

Helped an elderly couple get out of a sticky situation where employees more knowledgeable about the web tried to steal the company out from under them by taking over domains, etc.  – the couple (70 & 80 years old) remembered him down the road and approached him to help with the Marketing for their business and give him a percentage.  Verious decided to learn how to grow an Instagram account for their business – grew it from 22,000 – 34,000 followers

Instagram Tips

  • Instagram is a unique platform that lets you interact more casually and naturally with your followers
  • “Be a bit of a voyeur,” per Jason Tucker. Take a peek at how others are using instagram. See what people look at in the grocery store line. What engages?
  • InstaLikes https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/instalikes-for-instagram/id906899349?mt=8
  • Look for hashtags within your niche market and push out posts on that subject, using the tag
  • Influencer Marketing – look for influencers on Instagram – people with 60,000-90,000 followers (those with much larger fan bases won’t usually interact). Send them products you are trying to sell and in exchange, suggest that if they like it, they share it with their followers
  • Learn to develop your ‘voice’ – get comfortable with talking as your brand and making connections
  • Formed Oh My Lash Beauty Council – Created a group and spoke directly to them using terms of endearment and had fun with it.
  • Think about sharing your Instagram photos on your website to show a personal side – so clients can see more about your personality and who you are
  • Social media is a ‘small talk’ medium – don’t be afraid to talk about non-business topics, get to know people’s personalities
  • If you want to grow your account and get extra followers, connect with people who like what you like and help promote each other
  • Take time to develop your own style for your instagram account, some people post alternating text and images, some do all black and white, consistency can be visually appealing and build trust.
  • Marketing is really staying at the top of someone’s mind. You can post 12x a day, as much as you have time for.
  • Jab Jab Jab Right Hook – Gary Vaynerchuk – How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World https://www.amazon.com/Jab-Right-Hook-Story-Social/dp/006227306X
  • The 10X Rule – Grant Cardone – mentioned by Verious
    https://www.amazon.com/10X-Rule-Difference-Between-Success/dp/0470627603/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1485491425&sr=8-1&keywords=10x+rule
  • Follow that model – “ Share, share, share, share, ask!”- Bridget Willard

Instagram accounts to check out:

Tweet your Instagrams as native photos on Twitter – Instagram photos will show up in your Twitter feed as a full image rather than a link. https://ifttt.com/applets/103249p-tweet-your-instagrams-as-native-photos-on-twitter

Looking for WP pickup, lines? Watch the show or contact Bridget Willard.

Did you help us with our notes? Leave your name below

  • Jason Tucker – WPwatercooler @jasontucker http://www.jasontucker.blog
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
  • Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
  • Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
  • James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP60 – Marketing Your WordPress Business on Instagram w/ Verious Smith III appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Verious Smith III who is Creative Director of Philoveracity Design out of Riverside California. On this episode, we will be speaking with him about marketing your WordPress business using Instagram.

Verious and Bridget met talking abouteyelashes and instagram waiting for a food truck at a WordCamp

Helped an elderly couple get out of a sticky situation where employees more knowledgeable about the web tried to steal the company out from under them by taking over domains, etc.  – the couple (70 & 80 years old) remembered him down the road and approached him to help with the Marketing for their business and give him a percentage.  Verious decided to learn how to grow an Instagram account for their business – grew it from 22,000 – 34,000 followers

Instagram Tips

  • Instagram is a unique platform that lets you interact more casually and naturally with your followers
  • “Be a bit of a voyeur,” per Jason Tucker. Take a peek at how others are using instagram. See what people look at in the grocery store line. What engages?
  • InstaLikes https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/instalikes-for-instagram/id906899349?mt=8
  • Look for hashtags within your niche market and push out posts on that subject, using the tag
  • Influencer Marketing – look for influencers on Instagram – people with 60,000-90,000 followers (those with much larger fan bases won’t usually interact). Send them products you are trying to sell and in exchange, suggest that if they like it, they share it with their followers
  • Learn to develop your ‘voice’ – get comfortable with talking as your brand and making connections
  • Formed Oh My Lash Beauty Council – Created a group and spoke directly to them using terms of endearment and had fun with it.
  • Think about sharing your Instagram photos on your website to show a personal side – so clients can see more about your personality and who you are
  • Social media is a ‘small talk’ medium – don’t be afraid to talk about non-business topics, get to know people’s personalities
  • If you want to grow your account and get extra followers, connect with people who like what you like and help promote each other
  • Take time to develop your own style for your instagram account, some people post alternating text and images, some do all black and white, consistency can be visually appealing and build trust.
  • Marketing is really staying at the top of someone’s mind. You can post 12x a day, as much as you have time for.
  • Jab Jab Jab Right Hook – Gary Vaynerchuk – How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World https://www.amazon.com/Jab-Right-Hook-Story-Social/dp/006227306X
  • The 10X Rule – Grant Cardone – mentioned by Verious
    https://www.amazon.com/10X-Rule-Difference-Between-Success/dp/0470627603/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1485491425&sr=8-1&keywords=10x+rule
  • Follow that model – “ Share, share, share, share, ask!”- Bridget Willard

Instagram accounts to check out:

Tweet your Instagrams as native photos on Twitter – Instagram photos will show up in your Twitter feed as a full image rather than a link. https://ifttt.com/applets/103249p-tweet-your-instagrams-as-native-photos-on-twitter

Looking for WP pickup, lines? Watch the show or contact Bridget Willard.

Did you help us with our notes? Leave your name below

  • Jason Tucker – WPwatercooler @jasontucker http://www.jasontucker.blog
  • Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
  • Jen Miller @jenblogs4u
  • Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
  • James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP60 – Marketing Your WordPress Business on Instagram w/ Verious Smith III appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP59 – Podcasting with WordPress w/ Roy Sivan]]> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 01:15:42 GMT 1:28:05 no

This week on WPblab we’ll be speaking with fellow podcaster Roy Sivan of The WP Crowd & WPLife.

 

Check out The WP Crowd

Watch WPLife

Twitter

Notes

Formats

  • Audio only
  • Video only
  • iTunes

Misc Notes & Terms

“Doubleender” – two people record their own voices and one person puts it all together
“Evergreen” – Timeless and how topics never die out. A 3 year old episode still relevant
Name the show before or name the show after
Record live with google hangouts on air
Create topic before you get the people
Roy does: Pre-recorded shows and iMovie to edit and launch to youtube from iMovie
Jason does: Youtube-dl, and then bash script
Jeffrey Bradbury: go with the guest … not the script

Seriously simple podcasting – Seriously Simple Podcasting
Pull video and put it on Facebook

Tasks: Marketing, Tagging, Sharing

Adventures in Angular – Adventures in Angular Episodes
102 AiA Angular and WordPress with Ryan Sullivan and Roy Sivan

 

Microphones

 

Recording with Zooom.us, basic package

  • Hangouts but better
  • Stores recording, mp4

Show Notes

  • Speakers throwing in things into internal chat in google hangouts
  • Titler …. BrettTerpstra.com
  • No one click annotations of the show

Traffic

Hosting

Editing the video

  • Youtube vid in draft
  • Download and edit
  • Youtube video editor not good
  • Add an outro with subscribe messages

Camera

Backdrops

  • Coffee cup hooks
  • Wool fabric with eyelets

Sponsorships

WordPress podcasting has potential but don’t expect much

More Misc

Carlboard! #carlboard hashtag on Twitter

WP Watercooler image from Phoenix
We’re streaming live here at #WCPHX at the WPwatercooler table. Check out the stream at WPwatercooler-30 min weekly live WordPress talk show
https://scontent-yyz1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/23719_10151237768822807_1454478604_n.jpg?oh=d1807f1ff2cba11674b6781386f7bb0a&oe=58DA2411

WordCamp US elevator people
Hallway Track – Hallway Track

The #hiroy origin story

Level Up as a Developer, Building for pure joy

Hi Roy!

What’s next?

Even more Misc

Thank you for helping with the show notes

The post WPblab EP59 – Podcasting with WordPress w/ Roy Sivan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we’ll be speaking with fellow podcaster Roy Sivan of The WP Crowd & WPLife.

 

Check out The WP Crowd

Watch WPLife

Twitter

Notes

Formats

  • Audio only
  • Video only
  • iTunes

Misc Notes & Terms

“Doubleender” – two people record their own voices and one person puts it all together
“Evergreen” – Timeless and how topics never die out. A 3 year old episode still relevant
Name the show before or name the show after
Record live with google hangouts on air
Create topic before you get the people
Roy does: Pre-recorded shows and iMovie to edit and launch to youtube from iMovie
Jason does: Youtube-dl, and then bash script
Jeffrey Bradbury: go with the guest … not the script

Seriously simple podcasting – Seriously Simple Podcasting
Pull video and put it on Facebook

Tasks: Marketing, Tagging, Sharing

Adventures in Angular – Adventures in Angular Episodes
102 AiA Angular and WordPress with Ryan Sullivan and Roy Sivan

 

Microphones

 

Recording with Zooom.us, basic package

  • Hangouts but better
  • Stores recording, mp4

Show Notes

  • Speakers throwing in things into internal chat in google hangouts
  • Titler …. BrettTerpstra.com
  • No one click annotations of the show

Traffic

Hosting

Editing the video

  • Youtube vid in draft
  • Download and edit
  • Youtube video editor not good
  • Add an outro with subscribe messages

Camera

Backdrops

  • Coffee cup hooks
  • Wool fabric with eyelets

Sponsorships

WordPress podcasting has potential but don’t expect much

More Misc

Carlboard! #carlboard hashtag on Twitter

WP Watercooler image from Phoenix
We’re streaming live here at #WCPHX at the WPwatercooler table. Check out the stream at WPwatercooler-30 min weekly live WordPress talk show
https://scontent-yyz1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/23719_10151237768822807_1454478604_n.jpg?oh=d1807f1ff2cba11674b6781386f7bb0a&oe=58DA2411

WordCamp US elevator people
Hallway Track – Hallway Track

The #hiroy origin story

Level Up as a Developer, Building for pure joy

Hi Roy!

What’s next?

Even more Misc

Thank you for helping with the show notes

The post WPblab EP59 – Podcasting with WordPress w/ Roy Sivan appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP58 – Building Your WordPress Business Relationships Locally w/ Ross Gile – DigiCal]]> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 22:31:30 GMT 1:19:50 no

Building Your WordPress Business Relationships Locally – Ross Gile. Ross is owner of DigiCal a web development company in Whittier California. Ross is very involved in his City Council and Chamber of Commerce, we want to explore what the benefits are with connecting with local groups and how it as helped his business.

http://twitter.com/jasontucker
http://twitter.com/youtoocanbeguru
http://twitter.com/rossgile

Notes

  • Ross' Website DigiCal – http://www.digical.com
  • Join the chamber of commerce
  • Our local Chamber of Commerce https://www.whittierchamber.com/
  • Attend the events at your local chamber – get to shake hands and network with the right people
  • Chambers are for networking, meeting local businesses and talking with great local people.
  • Membership often includes free services such as monthly newsletters and promotions
  • The meetings can be a lot like a ‘meetup’ in style/atmosphere
  • There are side benefits too – making new friends, people remembering you when special events and opportunities come up – building relationships
  • Whittier Chamber of Commerce Business Expo
  • BNI – business networking international – forced leads needed to participate
  • DigiCal on Facebook
  • Make Notecards and HANDwrite thank yous to send to people.
  • Try to send out at least 5 notecards a week
  • Ross Dancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pWit6WWVRQ
  • Offer to teach a class at the local ‘adult learning’ center or college
  • Give yourself and your services away from time to time – great exposure
  • Don’t just ‘build business’ – build friendships too, networking is not the same as selling
  • Give back to your local community
  • Build a local events website like Ross did http://www.whittierevents.com/
    • Time.ly calendar plugin for WordPress
  • Leveraging your time – try investing 10 hours in your community/networking and you’ll get that much + more in return, can start with only 1 or 2 hours per week
  • Start small – don’t say yes to everything (work/life balance)
  • Outsource when you feel overwhelmed or underskilled – you don’t have to do everything yourself

Thanks to these fine folks to helping us with our crowd sourced show notes

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman
Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP58 – Building Your WordPress Business Relationships Locally w/ Ross Gile – DigiCal appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Building Your WordPress Business Relationships Locally – Ross Gile. Ross is owner of DigiCal a web development company in Whittier California. Ross is very involved in his City Council and Chamber of Commerce, we want to explore what the benefits are with connecting with local groups and how it as helped his business.

http://twitter.com/jasontucker
http://twitter.com/youtoocanbeguru
http://twitter.com/rossgile

Notes

  • Ross' Website DigiCal – http://www.digical.com
  • Join the chamber of commerce
  • Our local Chamber of Commerce https://www.whittierchamber.com/
  • Attend the events at your local chamber – get to shake hands and network with the right people
  • Chambers are for networking, meeting local businesses and talking with great local people.
  • Membership often includes free services such as monthly newsletters and promotions
  • The meetings can be a lot like a ‘meetup’ in style/atmosphere
  • There are side benefits too – making new friends, people remembering you when special events and opportunities come up – building relationships
  • Whittier Chamber of Commerce Business Expo
  • BNI – business networking international – forced leads needed to participate
  • DigiCal on Facebook
  • Make Notecards and HANDwrite thank yous to send to people.
  • Try to send out at least 5 notecards a week
  • Ross Dancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pWit6WWVRQ
  • Offer to teach a class at the local ‘adult learning’ center or college
  • Give yourself and your services away from time to time – great exposure
  • Don’t just ‘build business’ – build friendships too, networking is not the same as selling
  • Give back to your local community
  • Build a local events website like Ross did http://www.whittierevents.com/
    • Time.ly calendar plugin for WordPress
  • Leveraging your time – try investing 10 hours in your community/networking and you’ll get that much + more in return, can start with only 1 or 2 hours per week
  • Start small – don’t say yes to everything (work/life balance)
  • Outsource when you feel overwhelmed or underskilled – you don’t have to do everything yourself

Thanks to these fine folks to helping us with our crowd sourced show notes

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman
Cheryl LaPrade – @yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @heysherie
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP58 – Building Your WordPress Business Relationships Locally w/ Ross Gile – DigiCal appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP57 – The Nuts & Bolts of Effective WordPress Business Blogging w/ Jen Miller]]> Fri, 06 Jan 2017 01:26:07 GMT 1:23:05 no

This week on WPblab Jen Miller of needsomeonetoblog.com will be discussing how to get started with effectively starting a blog for your business.

Notes

  • GiveWP Channel
  • Jen Miller – Need Someone To Blog?
  • Be Seen Blogging
  • Need Someone To…
  • Women in WP
  • How can people find you as a business that blogs for others? Jen uses SEO, has a solid website name and people find her based on the type of work she does for others.
  • How much should you share on the blog of yourself? Who you are and what you stand for, let people know who are you and what you do. Let yourself stand out. If you are a better fit than the client will go with you.
  • Should there be a theme in your blog? Definitely. Bring a common element into the story. Dogs, volunteering. Build common ground with potential clients.
  • Hobbies and work can be tied together and can be talked about on the blog
  • How do you find themes for clients? Their hobbies and activities they do.
  • Not being in front of the computer means brain chills out and idle and have a great idea.
  • Do you recommend you follow / stalk clients before helping. No, they won’t have social in place.
  • Interviews and judging characters really helps to get ideas for the blog
  • How does the small business person sell the one t-shirt? You need a platform. Blogger,
  • WordPress, medium. Ideally starting with Facebook Page.
  • Own that space
  • Custom domain, memorable, keyword filled
  • Keywords tools:
  • Tell the backstory on the about page, tell the juicy tips. Tell the story behind the story
  • Tell the backstory of Rachel Carden setting it up…
  • Show how your clients are using your product in unique ways with case studies.
  • Some give out the secret sauce on the blog. Clients won’t go through it all
    http://noahelias.net/
  • Sells the product by telling a story through the blog
    http://noahfineart.com/blog/life-it-requires-some-assembly/
  • How do you get a story? Write a post it note and write up of why the product started, how it started.
  • Do website first. Then do twitter, then do facebook then do blog. Build in layers. Need copy!
  • The blog needs to match the supporting content that must have been been in a book 40 years ago.
  • Update website and revise all copy with keywords
  • Analyse support tickets, write about what people have issue with. Write about what people are searching for https://givewp.com/blog/
  • Write the blog post in google docs or a shareable medium. Not in WordPress
  • Looking for grammatical errors
  • More eyes on the words
  • Distraction free writing and revisions not really used in WordPress.
  • Blog posts need to be shared on social media platforms. Social proof gains value
  • Gravity form takes in user-generated content and saves it to draft
  • Google Docs are good for collaboration on blog posts
  • Google Alerts will keep yourself current
  • Podcasts are fuel for blog posts
  • How to find if you’ve got original content? Copy paste paragraph into google
  • If your content was stolen and the original site is down, then you have the original.
  • How long should the post be? As long as it should be to get the point across.
  • How often should you publish? Once a week. Posting on friday is actually okay
  • Don’t steal content. 70% original for ranking well. Google might hurt you for it.

Plugins, Themes and Software

Our show notes were prepared by:

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman

The post WPblab EP57 – The Nuts & Bolts of Effective WordPress Business Blogging w/ Jen Miller appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Jen Miller of needsomeonetoblog.com will be discussing how to get started with effectively starting a blog for your business.

Notes

  • GiveWP Channel
  • Jen Miller – Need Someone To Blog?
  • Be Seen Blogging
  • Need Someone To…
  • Women in WP
  • How can people find you as a business that blogs for others? Jen uses SEO, has a solid website name and people find her based on the type of work she does for others.
  • How much should you share on the blog of yourself? Who you are and what you stand for, let people know who are you and what you do. Let yourself stand out. If you are a better fit than the client will go with you.
  • Should there be a theme in your blog? Definitely. Bring a common element into the story. Dogs, volunteering. Build common ground with potential clients.
  • Hobbies and work can be tied together and can be talked about on the blog
  • How do you find themes for clients? Their hobbies and activities they do.
  • Not being in front of the computer means brain chills out and idle and have a great idea.
  • Do you recommend you follow / stalk clients before helping. No, they won’t have social in place.
  • Interviews and judging characters really helps to get ideas for the blog
  • How does the small business person sell the one t-shirt? You need a platform. Blogger,
  • WordPress, medium. Ideally starting with Facebook Page.
  • Own that space
  • Custom domain, memorable, keyword filled
  • Keywords tools:
  • Tell the backstory on the about page, tell the juicy tips. Tell the story behind the story
  • Tell the backstory of Rachel Carden setting it up…
  • Show how your clients are using your product in unique ways with case studies.
  • Some give out the secret sauce on the blog. Clients won’t go through it all
    http://noahelias.net/
  • Sells the product by telling a story through the blog
    http://noahfineart.com/blog/life-it-requires-some-assembly/
  • How do you get a story? Write a post it note and write up of why the product started, how it started.
  • Do website first. Then do twitter, then do facebook then do blog. Build in layers. Need copy!
  • The blog needs to match the supporting content that must have been been in a book 40 years ago.
  • Update website and revise all copy with keywords
  • Analyse support tickets, write about what people have issue with. Write about what people are searching for https://givewp.com/blog/
  • Write the blog post in google docs or a shareable medium. Not in WordPress
  • Looking for grammatical errors
  • More eyes on the words
  • Distraction free writing and revisions not really used in WordPress.
  • Blog posts need to be shared on social media platforms. Social proof gains value
  • Gravity form takes in user-generated content and saves it to draft
  • Google Docs are good for collaboration on blog posts
  • Google Alerts will keep yourself current
  • Podcasts are fuel for blog posts
  • How to find if you’ve got original content? Copy paste paragraph into google
  • If your content was stolen and the original site is down, then you have the original.
  • How long should the post be? As long as it should be to get the point across.
  • How often should you publish? Once a week. Posting on friday is actually okay
  • Don’t steal content. 70% original for ranking well. Google might hurt you for it.

Plugins, Themes and Software

Our show notes were prepared by:

Jonathan Perlman – @jpurpleman

The post WPblab EP57 – The Nuts & Bolts of Effective WordPress Business Blogging w/ Jen Miller appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[WPblab EP56 – Expanding Your WordPress Business on Pinterest w/ Carol Stephen]]> Thu, 29 Dec 2016 17:18:58 GMT 1:24:05 no

This week on WPblab Carol Stephen will be joining us to discuss how you can expand your WordPress business on Pinterest.

You can find Carol Stephen on Pinterest and her company Your Social Media Works she also runs the #DigiBlogChat on Tuesdays at 1pm PST.

  • Pinterest is a visual discovery “search engine”
  • Best to keep most popular boards at the top of your account since most people access via mobile
  • People on Pinterest are often there to buy or plan future purchases
  • Pinterest is ‘very sticky’ which means people tend to spend a lot of time on the site
  • Make sure you use very well-written descriptions, utilizing keywords
  • Using meta descriptions on images for your website ensures that when photos are pinned to pinterest they have the correct information
  • Very important to sign up for a ‘business account’ to get access to analytics
  • Pinterest is especially important to focus on if a majority of your audience is women
  • Timing is important; 6-7pm is when most people are active – there are apps to help you determine the best time to pin / keywords
  • Group boards can be helpful to create or join because they get a lot more traffic/interest
  • People want long skinny pins – got it
  • You can use a pinterest account to curate work you’ve done as a portfolio
  • Very important to click on the pin to follow the link and make sure you find the source – it may not link to what you think it is linking to!
  • Make sure if you are commenting on pins, you tag the Pinner … many accounts have thousands of pins and will miss your comment if you don’t tag them
  • Use your secret board as a draft or backlog.
  • Put the board with your blog posts or where you want to direct your traffic right next to your most popular board.  People may come to look at one and click through to the other!
  • Also use some of your Pinterest boards to share your personality and hobbies

Links

 

These folks helped us with the show notes this episode

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Jason Tucker – WPwatercooler @jasontucker
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP56 – Expanding Your WordPress Business on Pinterest w/ Carol Stephen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab Carol Stephen will be joining us to discuss how you can expand your WordPress business on Pinterest.

You can find Carol Stephen on Pinterest and her company Your Social Media Works she also runs the #DigiBlogChat on Tuesdays at 1pm PST.

  • Pinterest is a visual discovery “search engine”
  • Best to keep most popular boards at the top of your account since most people access via mobile
  • People on Pinterest are often there to buy or plan future purchases
  • Pinterest is ‘very sticky’ which means people tend to spend a lot of time on the site
  • Make sure you use very well-written descriptions, utilizing keywords
  • Using meta descriptions on images for your website ensures that when photos are pinned to pinterest they have the correct information
  • Very important to sign up for a ‘business account’ to get access to analytics
  • Pinterest is especially important to focus on if a majority of your audience is women
  • Timing is important; 6-7pm is when most people are active – there are apps to help you determine the best time to pin / keywords
  • Group boards can be helpful to create or join because they get a lot more traffic/interest
  • People want long skinny pins – got it
  • You can use a pinterest account to curate work you’ve done as a portfolio
  • Very important to click on the pin to follow the link and make sure you find the source – it may not link to what you think it is linking to!
  • Make sure if you are commenting on pins, you tag the Pinner … many accounts have thousands of pins and will miss your comment if you don’t tag them
  • Use your secret board as a draft or backlog.
  • Put the board with your blog posts or where you want to direct your traffic right next to your most popular board.  People may come to look at one and click through to the other!
  • Also use some of your Pinterest boards to share your personality and hobbies

Links

 

These folks helped us with the show notes this episode

Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Jason Tucker – WPwatercooler @jasontucker
James Tryon – @jamestryon

The post WPblab EP56 – Expanding Your WordPress Business on Pinterest w/ Carol Stephen appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab EP55 – Creating visibility and authority through social media]]> Thu, 15 Dec 2016 22:22:13 GMT 1:32:06 no

This week on WPblab we're joined by Robert Nissenbaum consultant & speaker at Tactical Social Media to discuss how you can create visibility and authority through social media.

Our crowd sourced show notes

  • New Give Blog layout – https://givewp.com/blog/
  • Remember you are writing for “people” not for search bots – over time your keywords will recur naturally when you are writing what you know
  • Authority – an indication of your site’s level of expertise in a given subject, based on quality content
  • The primary purposes of using social media are to drive traffic to your website and build relationships with your target audience
  • Content is not just what you post on your blog – content is your comments on facebook, others posts, etc – it creates visibility, shows your authority, develops relationships
  • If you have 2 hours to go and drive to a networking meeting, you have time in the week to take 10-15 minutes here and there to network online through social media
  • You still need to be/act like a human on social media, don’t just schedule messages, interact with people – start conversations, include some personal content
  • Relationships trump price and convenience, breeds loyalty
  • As much time as you have available you should be spending on social media marketing, building relationships take time
  • Utilize twitter lists! Excellent curation tool
  • http://nuzzel.com/ News from friends and influencers
  • Put on a timer for 15 minutes (you can do anything for 15 mins)! Focus on your social media interactions until the timer is up and then stop, the more you do it, the easier it will get.
  • https://www.rescuetime.com/ – big brother that cares
  • It’s really important to have a social media presence for your business on every major platform
    • Especially for tracking conversations about your business & to reply to customers
    • Start on the platform where you’re most comfortable and work up from there

These folks helped us out with the show notes

The post WPblab EP55 – Creating visibility and authority through social media appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we're joined by Robert Nissenbaum consultant & speaker at Tactical Social Media to discuss how you can create visibility and authority through social media.

Our crowd sourced show notes

  • New Give Blog layout – https://givewp.com/blog/
  • Remember you are writing for “people” not for search bots – over time your keywords will recur naturally when you are writing what you know
  • Authority – an indication of your site’s level of expertise in a given subject, based on quality content
  • The primary purposes of using social media are to drive traffic to your website and build relationships with your target audience
  • Content is not just what you post on your blog – content is your comments on facebook, others posts, etc – it creates visibility, shows your authority, develops relationships
  • If you have 2 hours to go and drive to a networking meeting, you have time in the week to take 10-15 minutes here and there to network online through social media
  • You still need to be/act like a human on social media, don’t just schedule messages, interact with people – start conversations, include some personal content
  • Relationships trump price and convenience, breeds loyalty
  • As much time as you have available you should be spending on social media marketing, building relationships take time
  • Utilize twitter lists! Excellent curation tool
  • http://nuzzel.com/ News from friends and influencers
  • Put on a timer for 15 minutes (you can do anything for 15 mins)! Focus on your social media interactions until the timer is up and then stop, the more you do it, the easier it will get.
  • https://www.rescuetime.com/ – big brother that cares
  • It’s really important to have a social media presence for your business on every major platform
    • Especially for tracking conversations about your business & to reply to customers
    • Start on the platform where you’re most comfortable and work up from there

These folks helped us out with the show notes

The post WPblab EP55 – Creating visibility and authority through social media appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[EP54 – WordCamp US Recap Show – WPblab]]> Thu, 08 Dec 2016 15:36:05 GMT 1:26:51 no

This week on the WPblab we're going to have our community on the show to talk about and recap the events that occurred at WordCamp US.

Joining us on the show: Sherie LaPrade, Cheryl LaPrade, Jonathan Perlman, Josh Pollock, James Tryon, Paul Oyler, Justine Pretorious, Jen Miller, Jon Brown, and your hosts Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker

The post EP54 – WordCamp US Recap Show – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on the WPblab we're going to have our community on the show to talk about and recap the events that occurred at WordCamp US.

Joining us on the show: Sherie LaPrade, Cheryl LaPrade, Jonathan Perlman, Josh Pollock, James Tryon, Paul Oyler, Justine Pretorious, Jen Miller, Jon Brown, and your hosts Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker

The post EP54 – WordCamp US Recap Show – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab EP053 – Google Built My WordPress Website]]> Wed, 16 Nov 2016 18:22:34 GMT 1:28:20 no

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Russell Aaron about the good and bad of building your WordPress website using only info you find from google searches.

https://russellenvy.com/google-built-my-website/

  • How to google for answers for WordPress questions
  • Googling will get you a lot of different answers, but the benefit is that you’ll learn many ways to accomplish a WordPress task or to answer a WP question
  • WordPress.tv – great resource for answers / tutorials
  • https://codex.wordpress.org/
  • Google Search Operators (for advanced searching)
  • Russell – “Most everything on my blog, I learned from Googling, so Google built my website.”
  • Oftentimes when you Google search a WordPress feature, the Codex will be your first result
  • WordPress TV YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpJf6LGZ0a4n9Lj4aVt9spg
  • As developers, we sometimes forget that not everything is as easy as we think it is
  • When Google using error messages remove your domain and file directories from the error message for better results.
  • Bridget – “part of our problem is we can be impatient with the learning process”… sometimes we are tempted to think we can go to a single meetup and have all our problems solved
  • Russell – the reason I know about “changelogs” is because I googled it … because of all my google searching I’ve learned a lot about how to build my WordPress sites … I didn’t go to college for what I know
  • https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/getting-started/
  • Russell – if you want to learn, read!  Start with 1 new article a day, then 2, then 3 … never stop learning – by the end of a month you’ll know a whole lot more than what you started with
  • Searching for things and learning how to search for things is a necessary skill
  • Russell – good developers know how to ask (and Google!)
    • Being specific with your searches can help shorten the time it takes to solve your problem

 

We crowd sounce our show notes, thank you all for helping us!

The post WPblab EP053 – Google Built My WordPress Website appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Russell Aaron about the good and bad of building your WordPress website using only info you find from google searches.

https://russellenvy.com/google-built-my-website/

  • How to google for answers for WordPress questions
  • Googling will get you a lot of different answers, but the benefit is that you’ll learn many ways to accomplish a WordPress task or to answer a WP question
  • WordPress.tv – great resource for answers / tutorials
  • https://codex.wordpress.org/
  • Google Search Operators (for advanced searching)
  • Russell – “Most everything on my blog, I learned from Googling, so Google built my website.”
  • Oftentimes when you Google search a WordPress feature, the Codex will be your first result
  • WordPress TV YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpJf6LGZ0a4n9Lj4aVt9spg
  • As developers, we sometimes forget that not everything is as easy as we think it is
  • When Google using error messages remove your domain and file directories from the error message for better results.
  • Bridget – “part of our problem is we can be impatient with the learning process”… sometimes we are tempted to think we can go to a single meetup and have all our problems solved
  • Russell – the reason I know about “changelogs” is because I googled it … because of all my google searching I’ve learned a lot about how to build my WordPress sites … I didn’t go to college for what I know
  • https://developer.wordpress.org/themes/getting-started/
  • Russell – if you want to learn, read!  Start with 1 new article a day, then 2, then 3 … never stop learning – by the end of a month you’ll know a whole lot more than what you started with
  • Searching for things and learning how to search for things is a necessary skill
  • Russell – good developers know how to ask (and Google!)
    • Being specific with your searches can help shorten the time it takes to solve your problem

 

We crowd sounce our show notes, thank you all for helping us!

The post WPblab EP053 – Google Built My WordPress Website appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[Building the WAPUUS Field Guide and Trading Post w/ James Tryon]]> Thu, 10 Nov 2016 22:56:27 GMT 1:22:20 no

This week on WPblab we're talking with James Tryon of Wapuus who provides a Field Guide and Trading Post for Wapuus which can be found at http://wapu.us. We'll be talking with James on how he came up with the idea of indexing all things Wapuu and what tools he used to make his website.

Thank you all!

Show notes contributors:

The post Building the WAPUUS Field Guide and Trading Post w/ James Tryon appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab we're talking with James Tryon of Wapuus who provides a Field Guide and Trading Post for Wapuus which can be found at http://wapu.us. We'll be talking with James on how he came up with the idea of indexing all things Wapuu and what tools he used to make his website.

Thank you all!

Show notes contributors:

The post Building the WAPUUS Field Guide and Trading Post w/ James Tryon appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab 051 – Why develop locally with WordPress?]]> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 23:44:41 GMT 1:22:25 no

This week we speak with Marc Benzakein and Gregg Franklin of ServerPress the makers of DesktopServer about why you should develop your WordPress powered website locally using DesktopServer.

Show airs November 3 at 7:30pm PT / 10:30 ET / 2am UTC

 

The post WPblab 051 – Why develop locally with WordPress? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week we speak with Marc Benzakein and Gregg Franklin of ServerPress the makers of DesktopServer about why you should develop your WordPress powered website locally using DesktopServer.

Show airs November 3 at 7:30pm PT / 10:30 ET / 2am UTC

 

The post WPblab 051 – Why develop locally with WordPress? appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab 050 – Customizing the WordPress Media Library]]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 14:44:28 GMT 1:30:16 no

This week on WPblab we'll be discussing how you can customize the WordPress Media Library to work better for you and for your clients. We'll be talking with Rachelle Wise on how she's going to be customizing the WordPress Media Library to make it easier for her clients to use and manage their media files. The show starts at 7:30pm Pacific.

The post WPblab 050 – Customizing the WordPress Media Library appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab we'll be discussing how you can customize the WordPress Media Library to work better for you and for your clients. We'll be talking with Rachelle Wise on how she's going to be customizing the WordPress Media Library to make it easier for her clients to use and manage their media files. The show starts at 7:30pm Pacific.

The post WPblab 050 – Customizing the WordPress Media Library appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab 049 – How to sell products using WordPress ecommerce]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2016 06:27:44 GMT 1:23:50 no

Shownotes prepared by:

Jason Tucker – @jasontuckerhttp://www.jasontucker.us
Emanuel “Manny” Costa – @emanweb https://blog.emanuelcosta.com
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

The post WPblab 049 – How to sell products using WordPress ecommerce appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

Shownotes prepared by:

Jason Tucker – @jasontuckerhttp://www.jasontucker.us
Emanuel “Manny” Costa – @emanweb https://blog.emanuelcosta.com
Sherie LaPrade – @HeySherie
Cheryl LaPrade – @YayCheryl

The post WPblab 049 – How to sell products using WordPress ecommerce appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab 048 – WordPress Community: Giving Back at a Nonprofit Hackathon – WPblab]]> Thu, 13 Oct 2016 20:53:19 GMT 1:28:01 no

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Natalie MacLees and Alex Vasquez of Website Weekend.LA a non-profit hackathon that pairs digital creatives with local non-profits.

Training and Empowering the client to do their own updates
Projects get a project manager and prep work happens before the event
Teams include volunteers with a range of skills (writers, content creators, UX, etc)
Non-profits provide content as well to save time
Issue is often lack of storytelling – people connect with stories (content is important)
Some clients want whole new sites, others want refresh
Dreamhost offers free hosting for 5013C organizations
GiveWP offered licenses
Sponsors help (food, etc.)
Important to take momentum from these events and do something positive with it
Find a local non-profit that you can partner with and can benefit from funds raised
It helps to be a prolific networker – knowing what organizations / people to connect with
Need to convince non-profits that a quality site can be built well, in just a weekend
Everyone can contribute, it’s not just about coding – need writers, designers, developers, etc.

Show notes generated in part by:
Jason Tucker – http://www.jasontucker.us
Tara Claeys – http://designtlc.com
Cheryl LaPrade – http://twitter.com/yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – http://twitter.com/heysherie

The post WPblab 048 – WordPress Community: Giving Back at a Nonprofit Hackathon – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This week on WPblab we'll be talking with Natalie MacLees and Alex Vasquez of Website Weekend.LA a non-profit hackathon that pairs digital creatives with local non-profits.

Training and Empowering the client to do their own updates
Projects get a project manager and prep work happens before the event
Teams include volunteers with a range of skills (writers, content creators, UX, etc)
Non-profits provide content as well to save time
Issue is often lack of storytelling – people connect with stories (content is important)
Some clients want whole new sites, others want refresh
Dreamhost offers free hosting for 5013C organizations
GiveWP offered licenses
Sponsors help (food, etc.)
Important to take momentum from these events and do something positive with it
Find a local non-profit that you can partner with and can benefit from funds raised
It helps to be a prolific networker – knowing what organizations / people to connect with
Need to convince non-profits that a quality site can be built well, in just a weekend
Everyone can contribute, it’s not just about coding – need writers, designers, developers, etc.

Show notes generated in part by:
Jason Tucker – http://www.jasontucker.us
Tara Claeys – http://designtlc.com
Cheryl LaPrade – http://twitter.com/yaycheryl
Sherie LaPrade – http://twitter.com/heysherie

The post WPblab 048 – WordPress Community: Giving Back at a Nonprofit Hackathon – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab 047 – Blogging for your Target Demographic with WordPress – Kitty Lusby – WPblab]]> Thu, 06 Oct 2016 19:38:04 GMT 1:29:46 no

This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with Kitty Lusby about blogging for your target demographic with WordPress.

The post WPblab 047 – Blogging for your Target Demographic with WordPress – Kitty Lusby – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab we'll be speaking with Kitty Lusby about blogging for your target demographic with WordPress.

The post WPblab 047 – Blogging for your Target Demographic with WordPress – Kitty Lusby – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab EP046 – Leveling up your WordPress content with podcasting]]> Thu, 29 Sep 2016 23:46:06 GMT 1:31:49 no

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be discussing how you can level up your content with podcasting.

The post WPblab EP046 – Leveling up your WordPress content with podcasting appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be discussing how you can level up your content with podcasting.

The post WPblab EP046 – Leveling up your WordPress content with podcasting appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WPblab EP045 – Securing your #WordPress site w/ Krystle Herbrandson of Sucuri Security]]> Wed, 21 Sep 2016 04:38:25 GMT 1:06:26 no

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be speaking with Krystle Herbrandson of Sucuri Security. If you are dealing with hackers, hacking or securing your WordPress website you should watch this episode.

4:30pm HST, 7:30pm PDT, 8:30pm MDT, 9:30pm CDT, 10:30pm EDT, 2:30am UTC 8:00am IST, 10:30am GST, 11:30am JST, 12:30pm AEST, 2:30pm NZST

The post WPblab EP045 – Securing your #WordPress site w/ Krystle Herbrandson of Sucuri Security appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker will be speaking with Krystle Herbrandson of Sucuri Security. If you are dealing with hackers, hacking or securing your WordPress website you should watch this episode.

4:30pm HST, 7:30pm PDT, 8:30pm MDT, 9:30pm CDT, 10:30pm EDT, 2:30am UTC 8:00am IST, 10:30am GST, 11:30am JST, 12:30pm AEST, 2:30pm NZST

The post WPblab EP045 – Securing your #WordPress site w/ Krystle Herbrandson of Sucuri Security appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[WordCamp: Beyond An Attendee – WPblab]]> Fri, 16 Sep 2016 02:07:02 GMT 1:26:06 no

This week on WPblab we'll be discussing attending a WordCamp as a sponsor, speaker or an organizer. Join us!

The post WordCamp: Beyond An Attendee – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab we'll be discussing attending a WordCamp as a sponsor, speaker or an organizer. Join us!

The post WordCamp: Beyond An Attendee – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP42 – #A11y, WordPress and Your Website w/Rachel Carden @bamadesigner – WPblab]]> Wed, 31 Aug 2016 05:14:35 GMT 1:27:23 no

On this episode we'll be joined by @bamadesigner Rachel Carden. She's Senior Software Engineer for Disney Interactive, Founder/Organizer of WP Campus and wA11y  which is a new initiative to contribute to web accessibility by providing information, education, resources, and tools. we'll be talking with her about accessibility concerns you should have about your website and how you can make your website more a11y friendly.

The post EP42 – #A11y, WordPress and Your Website w/Rachel Carden @bamadesigner – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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On this episode we'll be joined by @bamadesigner Rachel Carden. She's Senior Software Engineer for Disney Interactive, Founder/Organizer of WP Campus and wA11y  which is a new initiative to contribute to web accessibility by providing information, education, resources, and tools. we'll be talking with her about accessibility concerns you should have about your website and how you can make your website more a11y friendly.

The post EP42 – #A11y, WordPress and Your Website w/Rachel Carden @bamadesigner – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP41 – Your #WordPress Site Why Mobile Responsive Is Important – WPblab]]> Thu, 18 Aug 2016 18:03:28 GMT 1:16:44 no

The post EP41 – Your #WordPress Site Why Mobile Responsive Is Important – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.]]>

The post EP41 – Your #WordPress Site Why Mobile Responsive Is Important – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.]]> <![CDATA[EP39 – WordPress 101: Blogging to find your voice – WPblab]]> Thu, 04 Aug 2016 21:21:18 GMT 1:24:22 no

On this week's live broadcast Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker discussed how to find your voice for blogging. Chris Lema, and Kyle Maurer join the discussion providing insights into what they do as WordPress users, bloggers and public speakers.

WPwatercooler records live Mondays at 11am PT and WPblab record 7:30pm PT Thursdays and archives on YouTube, SoundCloud and our website https://www.wpwatercooler.com

The post EP39 – WordPress 101: Blogging to find your voice – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

On this week's live broadcast Bridget Willard and Jason Tucker discussed how to find your voice for blogging. Chris Lema, and Kyle Maurer join the discussion providing insights into what they do as WordPress users, bloggers and public speakers.

WPwatercooler records live Mondays at 11am PT and WPblab record 7:30pm PT Thursdays and archives on YouTube, SoundCloud and our website https://www.wpwatercooler.com

The post EP39 – WordPress 101: Blogging to find your voice – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP38 – #SocialMedia tips for a #WordPress Website Owner – WPblab]]> Thu, 28 Jul 2016 21:23:59 GMT 1:45:54 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, and James Tryon

Links mentioned on this episode

The post EP38 – #SocialMedia tips for a #WordPress Website Owner – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, and James Tryon

Links mentioned on this episode

The post EP38 – #SocialMedia tips for a #WordPress Website Owner – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[EP37 – Building #WordPress Community Through #Meetups]]> Thu, 21 Jul 2016 22:05:53 GMT 1:25:24 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Russell Aaron, Bridget Willard, and alex vasquez

The post EP37 – Building #WordPress Community Through #Meetups appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Russell Aaron, Bridget Willard, and alex vasquez

The post EP37 – Building #WordPress Community Through #Meetups appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP36 – Securing your #WordPress website with #SSL – WPblab]]> Thu, 14 Jul 2016 21:11:34 GMT 1:26:41 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Kevin Hoffman, Verious Smith III, and Adam Thomson

The post EP36 – Securing your #WordPress website with #SSL – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Kevin Hoffman, Verious Smith III, and Adam Thomson

The post EP36 – Securing your #WordPress website with #SSL – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP35 – Your 1st #WordCamp talk – What to know to share your Passion of #WordPress – WPblab]]> Thu, 07 Jul 2016 21:17:46 GMT 1:29:30 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Adam Silver, David Margowsky, and Made Better Studio

The post EP35 – Your 1st #WordCamp talk – What to know to share your Passion of #WordPress – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Adam Silver, David Margowsky, and Made Better Studio

The post EP35 – Your 1st #WordCamp talk – What to know to share your Passion of #WordPress – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

]]>
<![CDATA[EP34 – Freedom of Remote WordPress Work with Jon Brown – WPblab]]> Thu, 30 Jun 2016 21:21:58 GMT 1:28:07 no

This week on WPblab, Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker speak with Jon Brown about his life as a nomad, being the remote boss and working with remote workers. We also get into travel, dealing with slow wifi, having redundant internet access when abroad and his collection of cellular phone sim cards.

Later in the show, we are joined by Russell Aaron and Made Better Studio to ask some questions live on the air.

The post EP34 – Freedom of Remote WordPress Work with Jon Brown – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab, Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker speak with Jon Brown about his life as a nomad, being the remote boss and working with remote workers. We also get into travel, dealing with slow wifi, having redundant internet access when abroad and his collection of cellular phone sim cards.

Later in the show, we are joined by Russell Aaron and Made Better Studio to ask some questions live on the air.

The post EP34 – Freedom of Remote WordPress Work with Jon Brown – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP33 – Where to start with #WordPress #SEO – WPblab]]> Thu, 23 Jun 2016 21:26:23 GMT 1:25:04 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, John Locke, Bridget Willard, and William Bay

The post EP33 – Where to start with #WordPress #SEO – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, John Locke, Bridget Willard, and William Bay

The post EP33 – Where to start with #WordPress #SEO – WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP32 – How to get the most out of WordCamp? #WordPress – #WPblab]]> Thu, 16 Jun 2016 21:53:55 GMT 1:29:16 no

This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Robert Dall, and Russell Aaron

The post EP32 – How to get the most out of WordCamp? #WordPress – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This is a replay of the live broadcast with Jason Tucker, Bridget Willard, Robert Dall, and Russell Aaron

The post EP32 – How to get the most out of WordCamp? #WordPress – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP31 – What are the best #WordPress backup solutions? – #WPblab]]> Thu, 09 Jun 2016 22:50:38 GMT 1:27:33 no

This week on WPblab we're going to be talking about WordPress backup solutions. From hosted ones to plugins we'll be discussing them all. Come by and learn something or if you know of a solution join our discussion.

The post EP31 – What are the best #WordPress backup solutions? – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab we're going to be talking about WordPress backup solutions. From hosted ones to plugins we'll be discussing them all. Come by and learn something or if you know of a solution join our discussion.

The post EP31 – What are the best #WordPress backup solutions? – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP030 – Using #WordPress for Your #SmallBiz /w @sereedmedia – #WPblab]]> Thu, 26 May 2016 21:32:52 GMT 1:44:52 no

This week on WPblab Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker speak with Sé Reed of Sé Reed Media about how small businesses can use WordPress. There is much ranting and raving about the difficulties of getting small businesses to choose WordPress over companies like Wix and Squarespace. Sé shares her perspective on educating new users to WordPress and her quest for making the entry level of self hosted WordPress easier for small businesses.

The post EP030 – Using #WordPress for Your #SmallBiz /w @sereedmedia – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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This week on WPblab Bridget Willard & Jason Tucker speak with Sé Reed of Sé Reed Media about how small businesses can use WordPress. There is much ranting and raving about the difficulties of getting small businesses to choose WordPress over companies like Wix and Squarespace. Sé shares her perspective on educating new users to WordPress and her quest for making the entry level of self hosted WordPress easier for small businesses.

The post EP030 – Using #WordPress for Your #SmallBiz /w @sereedmedia – #WPblab appeared first on WPwatercooler.

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<![CDATA[EP029 – Using WordPress in Education – Talking w/ TeacherCast – #WPblab]]> Thu, 19 May 2016 21:38:09 GMT 1:59:29 no

This week on WPblab we're going to be doing a collaborative show with Jeffrey Bradbury of TeacherCast discussing WordPress in the education space.

On this episode:Jeffrey Bradbury of TeacherCast join Bridget Willard and  Jason Tucker.